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Full text of "Bulletin of Wake Forest University"

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^Bulletin of the, 

^ake Forest Univef 

Graduate School 

Including 

S^p^fftan Gray Serial 
' ^^of Medicine 5> ,;• 







.:■' 



"■"4. , 




*are mR? 



ew Series 



April 1980 



Volume 75, Number 3 







Bulletin of 

Wake Forest 
College 

The Undergraduate School 
of Wake Forest University 

Announcements for 

1980-1981 



he Bulletin of Wake Forest University is published seven times annually bv the University at Winston-Salem. North Carolina 

Second class postage paid at Winston-Salem, North Carolina. 

UPS 078-320 

Printed bv Winston Printing Company, Winston-Salem. North Carolina 27105 



The Calendar 



Fall Semester 1980 



August 




28 


Thursday 


August 




30 


Saturday 


August 


29- 


-31 


Friday- 
Sun dav 


September 




. 2 


Monday, 
Tuesday 


September 




3 


Wednesday 


September 




9 


Tuesday 


September 




16 


Tuesday 


October 




3 


Friday 


October 




17 


Friday 


October 




20 


Monday 


October 




24 


Friday 


November 


27- 


-30 


Thursday- 
Sunday 


December 




1 


Monday 


December 




10 


Wednesday 


December 


12, 


13 


Friday, 

Saturday 


December 


15- 


-is 


Monday— 
Thursday 


December 




19 


Friday 


December ' 


20- 




Saturday- 


January 


11 


Sunday 



Residence balls open at noon for first year student 
Residence halls open at noon for transfer student! 

Orientation lor new students 

Registration for all courses 

Classes begin 
( )pening Convocation 
Last day to add courses 
Last dav to drop courses 
Fall holiday 
Classes resume 
Mid-term grades clue 
Thanksgiving recess 

(Masses resume 
Classes end 
Examinations 

Examinations 

Examinations end 
Christmas recess 







JAN 








M 


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MAY 








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<■■' 


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F S 




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1980 







FEB 






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MAR 








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NOV 



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AUG 








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DEC 




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auary 
muary 
-auary 
bruary 
bruarv 
bruary 
bruary 
bruary 
: irch 
arch 
arch 

arch 

Mil 

}ril 

ay 

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ay 
ay 
ay 



12, 13 



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19 
27 

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10 
1 1 
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2 
20 
29 



21- 



Spring Semester 1981 

Monday, Registration for all courses 

Tuesday 

Wednesday Classes begin for 4- and 15-week courses 

Monday Last day to drop or add 4-week courses 

Tuesday Last day to add 15-week courses 

Thursday Founders' Day Convocation 

Tuesday Classes end for 4-week courses 

Wednesday Classes begin for 11 -week courses 

Friday Last day to drop 15-week courses 

Friday Last day to add 11 -week courses 

Mondav Last day to drop 1 1-week courses 

Midterm grades due 

Spring recess 



30 

20 

21 

1 

4-6 

7 
8, 9 

11 
12 
17 

18 



JAN 



1 2 3 
4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
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25 26 27 28 29 30 31 



Friday 
Saturday- 
Sunday 
Monday 
Monday 
Tuesday 
Friday 
Monday- 



Classes resume 
Faster Monday holiday 
Classes resume 
Classes end 
Examinations 



Wednesday 
Thursday Reading Day 



Friday, 

Saturday 
Monday 
Tuesday 
Sunday 
Monday 



Examinations 

Examinations 
Examinations end 
Baccalaureate 
Commencement 



1981 







FEB 








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MAY 








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2? 


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JUNE 








M 
1 


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3 4 


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10 11 


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17 18 


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JULY 










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SEPT 

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M 


OCT 

T W I 


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2 

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13 14 15 


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23 


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NOV 






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22 


23 


24 25 26 


27 


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APR 

T W ! 

1 2 


F 

3 


s 

4 


5 6 


7 8 9 


10 


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12 13 


14 15 16 


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18 


19 20 


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28 29 30 









M 


AUG 

I W T 


F 


s 


2 


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4 5 6 


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1 
8 


9 


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25 26 27 


?8 


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DEC 










u 


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5 


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15 16 


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22 23 


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31 







The Bulletin 



The Calendar ' 

The University j 

Libraries j 

Recognition and Accreditation |( 

The College M 

Purpose II 

History and Development 11 

Administration 1 <• 

Buildings and Grounds 1! 

Student Life 2( 

Student Government 2( 

College Union 21 

Men's and Women's Residence Councils 2! 

Interfraternity and Intersociety Councils 2S 

Honor Societies and Professional Fraternities 21 

Academic Awards 2I ; 

Intramural Athletics 2! 

Intercollegiate Athletics 2! 

Religious Activities 24 

Cultural Activities 24 

Educational Planning and Placement 2E 

Health, Psychological Services 2! 

Procedures 2f 

Admission 2( 

Application 2f 

Early Decision 21 

Admission of Handicapped Students 21 

Advanced Placement and CLEP 21 

Transfer Credit 2> 

Expenses 2h 

Tuition 28 

Room Charges 2t 

Food Services 2t 

Other Charges 29 

Refunds 30 

Housing 30 

Academic Calendar 31 

Orientation and Advising 31 

Registration 31 

Classification 32 

Class Attendance 32 

Auditing Classes 33 

Dropping a Course 3 5 



Withdrawal from the College 33 

Examinations 34 

Grading 34 

Grade Reports and Transcripts 35 

Dean's List 35 

Graduation Distinctions 35 

Repetition of Courses 35 

Probation 35 

Requirements for Continuation 36 

Requirements for Readmission 37 

Senior Conditions 37 

cholarships and Loans 38 

Scholarships 38 

Exchange Scholarships 42 

Loans 43 

Concessions 44 

Other Financial Aid 45 

pecial Programs 47 

Honors Study 47 

Open Curriculum 47 

Residential Language Centers 47 

Study at Salem College 47 

Summer Study 48 

January Study 48 

Opportunities for Study Abroad 48 

London 48 

Venice 48 

; France 48 

Spain 49 

>j India 49 

Independent Study 49 

Requirements for Degrees 50 

Degrees Offered 50 

• General Requirements 50 

; Basic Requirements 51 

Divisional Requirements 51 

Requirement in Physical Education 52 

Proficiency in the Use of English 52 

Completion of Lower Division Requirements 52 

Admission to the Upper Division 53 

Fields of Study in the Upper Division 53 

Maximum Number of Courses in a Department 54 

Double Majors and Joint Majors 54 

Senior Testing 54 

Combined Degrees in the School of Law 54 

Combined Degrees in Medical Sciences 55 



Combined Degrees in Medical Technology 5: 

Degrees in the Physician Assistant Program 5( 

Degrees in Microbiology 5( 

Degrees in Dentistry 51 

Degrees in Engineering 5 

Degrees in Forestry and Environmental Studies 5j 

Courses of Instruction 5 

Anthropology 5 

Art 6! 

Asian Studies 6| 

Biology 6 

Business and Accountancy 7 

Chemistry 74 

Classical Languages 76 

Economics 79 

Education 82 

English 87 

German 92 

History 91 

Humanities 98 

Interdisciplinary Honors 100 

Mathematics 102 

Military Science 105 

Music 1 ()() 

Philosophy Ill 

Physical Education Ill 

Physics 117 

Politics 11!) 

Psychology 124 

Religion 128 

Romance Languages 133 

Sociology 142 

Speech Communication and Theatre Arts 144 

Degrees Conferred 150 

Honorary Societies 161 

Enrollment 163 

The Board of Trustees 166 

The Board of Visitors 167 

The Administration 169 

The College Faculty 1 75 

Emeriti 190 

The Committees of the Faculty 192 

Index 196 




Reynolda Hall 



The University 



Wake Forest University is characterized by its devotion to liberal arts learning and 
professional preparation for men and women, its strong sense of community and' 
fellowship, and its encouragement of free inquiry and expression. 

Founded in 1834 by the Baptist State Convention of North Carolina, the school 
opened its doors to students on February 3 as Wake Forest Institute, with Samuel 
Wait as principal. It was located in the Forest of Wake County, North Carolina, on the 
plantation of Dr. Calvin Jones, near which the Village of Wake Forest later de- 
veloped. 

Rechartered in 1838 as Wake Forest College, it is one of the oldest institutions of 
higher learning in the state. It was exclusively a college of liberal arts for men until 
1894, when the School of Law was established. The School of Medicine, founded in 
1902, offered a two-year medical program until 1941. In that year the School was 
moved from the Town of Wake Forest to Winston-Salem, became associated with the 
North Carolina Baptist Hospital, and was renamed the Bowman Gray School of 
Medicine in honor of the benefactor who made possible the move and expansion to a 
full four-year program. In 1942 Wake Forest admitted women as regular undergrad- 
uate students. 

A School of Business Administration was established in 1948 and for over two 
decades offered an undergraduate program of study in business. In 1969 the under- 
graduate school was succeeded by the Department of Business and Accountancy and 
the Department of Economics in Wake Forest College; at the same time the Babcock. 
Graduate School of Management was established. The Division of Graduate Studies 
was established in 1 96 1 . It is now organized as the Graduate School and encompasses 
advanced work in the arts and sciences on both the Reynolda and Hawthorne 
Campuses in Winston-Salem. The summer session was inaugurated in 1921. 

In 1946 the Trustees of Wake Forest College and the Baptist State Convention of 
North Carolina accepted a proposal by the Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation to relocate 
the non-medical divisions of the College in Winston-Salem, where the School of 
Medicine was already established. The late Charles H. Babcock and his wife, the late 
Mary Reynolds Babcock, contributed a campus site, and building funds were re- 
ceived from many sources. Between 1952 and 1956 the first fourteen buildings were 
erected in Georgian style on the new Winston-Salem campus. In 1956 the College 
moved all operations, leaving the 122-year-old campus in the Town of Wake Forest to 
the Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary. 

The decade that followed was the College's most expansive, and in 1967 its 
augmented character was recognized by the change in name to Wake Forest Universi- 
ty. Today enrollment in all schools of the University stands at over 4,500. Governance 
remains in the hands of the Board of Trustees, and development for each of the five 
schools of the University is augmented by Boards of Visitors for the undergraduate 
College and Graduate School, the School of Law, the Graduate School of Manage- 
ment, and the School of Medicine. A joint board of University 4 rustees and Trustees 
of the North Carolina Baptist Hospital is responsible for the Medical Center, which 
includes the hospital and the School of Medicine. Alumni and parents' organizations 
are also active at Wake Forest, and support by the Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation and 
other foundations and corporations is strong and continuing. 



Wake Forest's relationship with the Baptist State Convention is an important part 
'the school's heritage. Wake Forest's founders proposed to establish an institution 
,iat would provide education under Christian influences. The basis for the con- 
. luing relationship between the University and the Convention is a mutually agreed- 
oon covenant which grows out of a commitment to God and to each other. The 
wenant expresses the Convention's deep interest in Christian higher education and 
ie University's desire to serve the denomination as one of its constituencies. Wake 
;)rest receives significant financial and intangible support from the Convention and 
onvention-aff iliated churches. 

The College, Graduate School, School of Law, and Graduate School of Manage- 
ment are located on the Reynolda Campus in northwest Winston-Salem. The Bow- 
man Gray School of Medicine is about four miles away, near the city's downtown on 
I hat is known as the Hawthorne Campus. The University also offers instruction 
egularly at Casa Artom in Venice, at Worrell House in London, and in other places 
round the world. 

The College offers courses of study leading to the baccalaureate in thirty depart- 
lents and interdisciplinary areas. The School of Law offers the Juris Doctor and the 
iraduate School of Management the Master of Business Administration degree. In 
ddition to the Doctor of Medicine degree, the School of Medicine offers through the 
Graduate School programs leading to the Master of Science and Doctor of Philoso- 
phy degrees in the basic medical sciences. The Graduate School confers the Master of 
Arts, Master of Arts in Education, and Master of Science decrees in the arts and 
ciences and the Doctor of Philosophy degree in biology and chemistry. 

Libraries 

, The libraries of Wake Forest University support research in undergraduate educa- 
ion and in each of the disciplines in which a graduate degree is offered. An 
! endowment provided by a substantial gift from the Mary Reynolds Babcock Founda- 
j ion and another from Nancy Reynolds has been assigned to the sustained expansion 
7 ind development of library resources, especially to support the graduate program. 
f( The libraries of the University hold membership in the Association of Southeastern 
^Research Libraries. 

The library collections total 745,992 volumes. Of these, 5(58,429 constitute the 
.general collection in the Z. Smith Reynolds Library, 74, 507 are housed in the School 
tlof Law, 92,148 in the library of the Bowman Gray School of Medicine, and 10,908 in a 
relatively new library in the Babcock Graduate School of Management. Subscriptions 
Lto 9,312 periodicals and serials, largely of scholarly content, are maintained by the 
: four libraries of the University. 4 he holdings of the Z. Smith Reynolds Library also 
I, include 20,228 reels of microfilm, 237,005 pieces of microcards, microprint, and 
L microfiche, and 67,750 volumes of United States government publications. 

Special collections cover the works of selected late nineteenth and early twentieth 
, century English and American writers, with pertinent critical material, a Mark Twain 
Collection, a Gertrude Stein Collection, and the Ethel Taylor Crittenden Collection 
in Baptist History. The recent acquisition of the Charles H. Babcock Collection of 
Rare and Fine Books represents an important addition to the resources of the Z. 
Smith Reynolds Library. 



10 



The library instructional program includes an orientation workshop in research 

methods, assistance in independent and directed studies, and bibliographic presenta-" 
tions as requested by faculty. 

Recognition and Accreditation 

Wake Forest University is a member ol the Southern Association of ( iolleges and! 
Schools, the Southern Universities Conference, the Association of American Col- 
leges, the Conference of Southern Craduate Schools, and the Council of Craduate 
Schools in the United States. The University has chapters of the principal national 
social fraternities, professional fraternities, and honor societies, including Phi Beta 
Kappa and Sigma Xi. The Bowman Cray School of Medicine is a member of the 
Association of American Medical Colleges and is on the approved list of the Council 
on Medical Education of the American Medical Association. The program in counsel- 
ing leading to the Master of Arts in Education degree is accredited by the National 
Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education. 

Wake Forest College was accredited bv the Southern Association of Colleges and 
Schools in 1921. The reaccreditation of 1965 included the master's and doctoral 
degree programs in the Division of Craduate Studies. Accreditation was reaffirmed 
in December 1975. 



■;?.« 




The Old Campus 



The College 



, Wake Forest College is the undergraduate school of arts and sciences of Wake 
orest University. It is the center of the University's academic life; through it the 
niversity carries on the tradition of preparing men and women for personal 
irichment, enlightened citizenship, and professional life. 

Wake Forest College is a place of meeting. Its teachers and students are of diverse 

ackgrounds and interests, and that diversity is crucial to the distinctive character of 

le College. Wake Forest continually examines its educational purpose and evaluates 

. s success in fulfilling it. A formal statement of purpose was prepared as part of the 

:hool's decennial reaccreditation process and was adopted by the Board of Trustees. 

1 Purpose 

The people who wrote the Statement of Purpose were guided by the history of 
Vake Forest, particularly the history of its expressed and implied objectives. Their 
oal was to articulate the attributes which make Wake Forest distinctive. 

"We believe," they said, "that Wake Forest should be as good an academy as 
>ossible. We believe that diversity should exist in the faculty, staff, and student body 
nd that such diversity is necessary as Wake Forest seeks to meet its educational 
esponsibilities, and as a guide to those who must make the decisions which will 
letermine the school's character in the future." 

Following is the official statement of purpose of Wake Forest College. 

Statement of Purpose 

Wake Forest is a university entrusted with a vital religious heritage and an 
equally vital tradition of academic freedom. Recognizing the special charac- 
ter of its obligation as an educational institution, Wake Forest assumes the 
responsibility of insuring that the Christian faith will be an integral part of 
the University's common life. The University maintains its historic religious 
perspective through an association with the Baptist churches of North 
Carolina, the visible symbol and ministry of the campus church, the chap- 
laincy, and the Christian commitment of individuals within the faculty and 
administration. At Wake Forest, those who represent this perspective en- 
gage in a continuing dialogue with those of other views who join with them 
in dedication to teaching and learning. Together they assume responsibility 
for the integrity of the institution and for its commitment to academic 
excellence. 

In keeping with its belief in the value of community, Wake Forest also 
recognizes an obligation to preserve its atmosphere of mutual respect and of 
openness to diverse interests and concerns. Its religious heritage, which 
continues to find expression in tradition, ritual, and convocation, provides 
unifying and sustaining values beneficial to the whole community. Because 
of its heritage, Wake Forest fosters honesty and good will, and it encourages 
the various academic disciplines to relate their particular subjects to the 
fundamental questions which pertain to all human endeavor. 



12 

Along with the value of community, Wake Forest respects the value of the 
individual, which it expresses through its concern for the education of the 
whole person. In view of this concern, a basic curriculum composed of the 
liberal arts and sciences is essential to the objectives of the College. This 
means that though the usefulness of professional and technical courses is 
acknowledged, it is necessary that such courses be related to a comprehen- 
sive program of humanistic and scientific studies. In particular, this objec- 
tive requires an acceptable level of proficiencv in those linguistic and mathe- 
matical skills which are basic to other pursuits. It also calls for a study of the 
major contributions from one or more representative areas within the 
natural sciences, the social sciences, and the humanities, including an exami- 
nation of integrating disciplines such as religion, philosophy, and history. 
Such a course of study, when made an essential part of the total offering, 
prevents the premature specialization which threatens effective communi- 
cation among the disciplines, and it addresses the fundamental as well as the 
vocational needs of the student. Wake Forest expects that all of the courses 
in its curriculum will make significant demands upon the talents of the 
student and will encourage the development of a humane disposition and an 
inquiring spirit. 

History and Development 

Since 1834 Wake Forest College has persevered, sometimes barely, through wars 
economic crises, and controversy. In spite of these difficulties — perhaps because ol 
them — the College has developed its distinctive pattern of characteristics; tenacity 
independence, a fierce defense of free inquiry and expression, and a concern thai 
knowledge be used responsiblv and compassionately. 

That these qualities have often been passed along to Wake Forest's students is 
evident in the lives many have led. That these characteristics have served the school 
well is displayed by its growth from a small sectarian school to one of the nation's 
significant small private universities. 

A brief historv of Wake Forest is useful in understanding the Universitv as it is 
today and appreciating the process through which it developed. 

The founding of Wake Forest College in 1834 was one manifestation of the 
intellectual and humanitarian reform movement in North Carolina and the nation 
during the 1830s. The beginnings of the College and the formation of the Baptist 
State Convention of North Carolina were closely interwoven: a leading motive for the 
organization of the Convention was that it serve as an agency for establishing an 
institution that would provide education under Christian influences. 

The leaders in the movement for Convention and College were ministers and 
lavmen from diverse backgrounds. Martin Ross, a North Carolinian; Thomas Mere- 
dith, a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania; and Samuel Wait, a graduate of 
Columbian College in Washington, D. C. The inspiration of Ross, the scholarship of 
Meredith, and the leadership of Wait combined to lead the Baptists of North Carolina 
into the formation of the Baptist State Convention on March 26, 1830. Wait was 
appointed as the Convention's agent to explain to churches, associations, and others 



13 

le need for a college to provide "an education in the liberal arts in fields requisite for 
entlemen." 

For nearly three years Wait traveled over the state in his wagon, speaking to a large 
umber of the approximately 15,000 Baptists who lived in the Piedmont and coastal 
ounties. Perhaps as many as one-half opposed missions, education, and other 
enevolences, but after two years of educational canvassing Wait reported enough 
entiment in favor of the program of the Convention to proceed. 

A 600-acre plantation, located sixteen miles north of Raleigh, was purchased from 
)r. Calvin Jones in 1832 for $2,000, and the North Carolina Legislature was asked to 
;rant a charter for a literary institution based on the manual labor principle. The 
obbying of opponents, both Baptist and non-Baptist, was effective; only the tie- 
leaking vote of William D. Moseley, speaker of the Senate and a graduate of the 
Jniversity of North Carolina, secured passage of the charter-granting bill. It was a 
neager charter, subject to various restrictions and limited to a period of twenty years, 
nit the birth of Wake Forest had been achieved. Its subsequent growth would be the 
"esult of creative adjustments and successful responses to a series of other challenges. 
After his successful three-year canvass of the state, Samuel Wait was elected 
principal of the new institution. Sixteen students registered on February 3, 1834; 
oefore the end of the year seventy-two had enrolled. The manual labor principle, 
adopted as a partial means of financing the institution, was abandoned after five 
years, and the school was rechartered in 1838 as Wake Forest College. 

The economic crisis of 1837 had such an adverse effect that support for the College 
and student enrollment steadily declined; only a loan of $10,000 from the State 
Literary Fund in 1 84 1 prevented bankruptcy. During these years of arduous struggle 
to keep the College alive, President Wait exhausted his physical strength and con- 
tracted an illness which forced him to resign the presidency in 1845. 

William Hooper succeeded Wait, and the prospects of the College became bright- 
er. Hooper, a grandson of one of North Carolina's three signers of the Declaration of 
Independence, had received his education at the University of North Carolina. As a 
native North Carolinian with family connections extending over several generations, 
he was able to mobilize public opinion in support of the College. 

After Hooper's resignation the Trustees elected to the presidency Professor of 
Mathematics John B. White, a graduate of Brown University. Since the mortgages on 
the physical facilities had been paid during Hooper's tenure, fund raising efforts 
i during President White's administration could be concentrated on increasing the 
College endowment. The Trustees authorized a capital campaign and selected as its 
leader Washington Manly Wingate, an 1849 graduate who within a year and a half 
raised approximately $33,000. 
■ But the temper of the times was unsuited to leadership by a Northerner, and 
President White resigned in 1854. The Trustees chose as his successor Wingate, then 
twenty-six years old and the first alumnus of the College to serve as president. Under 
his vigorous leadership, which spanned nearly three decades, the quality of students 
improved and new faculty members were added. During the first eight years of 
Wingate's administration, sixty-six students graduated — more than half of the total 
graduated during the first twenty-three years in the life of the College. In 1857 
President Wingate launched a campaign to produce an additional endowment of 



14 

$50,000, over one-half of which was raised in a single evening during the 18 j 
meeting of the Convention. 

This period of growth and expansion was cut short by the division of the nation 
1861. The Conscription Act of 1863 did not exempt students, and for three years ' 
the Civil War the College suspended operations. The buildings were used briefly l<| 
a girls' school; after 1863 the Confederate government used College facilities as] 
military hospital. 

Following Sherman's march through the South and Lee's surrender at Appoml 
tox, a peace of desolation pervaded the region. Supporters of Wake Forest survevtl 
what remained: College buildings, now leaky and in poor repair; approximate] 
$1 1,700 from a pre-war endowment of $100,000; the former president and facult) 
loyal group of trustees. There was also something else; an indomitable spirit 
determination that Wake Forest should emerge from the wreck of war and fulfill i 
mission. 

The needs of the College were great and financial prospects poor, but in Novemf « 
1865, barely six months after the end of the war, nine members of the Board < 
Trustees, acting with unwarranted courage, authorized the resumption of classe 
Wingate was persuaded to resume the presidency, and on January 15, 1866, fifty-on 
students enrolled. The number increased as the South and its economy slow 
recovered. 

President Wingate realized that the people of North Carolina had to be awakene 
to the need for education in the renascent south, and that they must be persuadei 
that Wake Forest could help serve that need. To launch this campaign, a Baptist 
sponsored, statewide educational convention was held in Raleigh, but before fund 
could be collected, the financial crisis of 1873 ended all immediate hope for endow, 
merit. The failure of the 1873—74 fund raising campaign placed the College in 
precarious position. The triple encumbrances of war, reconstruction, and financia 
panic made it evident that little money could be raised in North Carolina. Th 
Committee on Endowment of the Board of Trustees appointed James S. Purefoy, ; 
local merchant and Baptist minister, as agent to solicit funds in the Northern state; 
for continued operation of the College. While serving as treasurer of the Board 
before the war, he had salvaged $1 1,700 from the pre-war endowment of $100,00' 
by persuading the Trustees to invest half of the endowment in state bonds. After two 
years of unrelenting and often discouraging labor, without remuneration, he placed 
in the hands of the Trustees the sum of $9,200. 

It was also in the bleak days of Financial uncertainty that a Wake Forest student, 
James W. Denmark, proposed and founded the First college student loan fund in the 
United States. A Confederate veteran, Denmark had worked six years to accumulate 
enough money for his own college expenses. Soon after entering Wake Forest in 1 87 I 
he realized that many students had the same great financial need. From his meager 
funds he spent five dollars for post cards and wrote to college presidents across the 
country asking how their loan funds were organized. When he found that the colleges 
had none, he enlisted the support of faculty and students at Wake Forest and in 1877 
persuaded the Legislature to charter the North Carolina Baptist Student Loan Fund. 
Now known as the James W. Denmark Loan Fund, it is the oldest college student loan 



15 

ie| i;ind in the United States and has assets of $325,000 to serve the needs of students 
xording to the purposes of its founder. 

By the close of President Wingate's second administration in 1 879, the College had 
een successfully revived. The endowment had been increased and new construction 
ad begun. Perhaps the greatest service President Wingate rendered was bringing to 
le College a faculty of highly qualified scholars who served the College with distinc- 
on and dedication over many years. Among them were Professors William G. 
immons (1855-88), William Royall (1859-70; 1880-92), William Bailey Royall 
,1866-1928), Luther Rice Mills (1867-1907), and Charles Elisha Taylor (1870- 
915), who served as president from 1884 to 1905. Two other scholars who became 
ators or adjunct professors in the last year of President Wingate's administration 
/ere also destined to play important roles in the life of the College: Needham Y. 
pulley, who established the School of Law in 1894 and served as its first dean for 
hirty-six years, and biologist William Louis Poteat, who served the College for fifty 
ears, twenty-two of them as president. 
The administration of President Thomas Henderson Pritchard, which followed 
hat of President Wingate, was brief and served principally to further Wingate's 
Ifforts to persuade Baptists and other North Carolinians to improve the deplorable 
ondition of education in the state. The second alumnus of the College to serve as 
^resident, Pritchard was an eloquent speaker whose prominent leadership among 
baptists increased the patronage of the College and improved its image among its 
Constituency. 

Charles Elisha Taylor, whom President Wingate had brought to the faculty in 
'1880, was elected in 1884 to serve as the sixth president. 

1 Taylor's administration from 1884 to 1905 brought enrichment of the academic 
'orogram in a variety of ways. Academic departments were increased from eight to 
thirteen, and the size of the faculty more than doubled. Two new schools were added: 
:he School of Law in 1894 and the School of Medicine in 1902. Progress in other areas 
'(included the addition of buildings and the landscaping of the campus. Over 400 trees 
were planted, making Magnolia grandiflora almost synomymous with the Wake Forest 
campus. 

President Taylor was succeeded by William Louis Poteat. Affectionately known as 

f'Doctor Billy" to students during and after his twenty-two year administration, he 

'continued to promote the general growth of all areas of College life. Special emphasis 

! : was placed on development in the sciences, reflecting in part the interests of the 

president and in part the need to enrich the pre-medical training required by the new 

School of Medicine. 

As student enrollment increased from 313 in 1905 to 742 in 1927, there was a 
corresponding increase in the size of the faculty. Registration in religion, English, 
education, and the social sciences required more administrative direction, and a dean 
: and a registrar were employed along with a library staff. Propelled by the trend of the 
! other colleges in the state, Wake Forest gave more attention to sports and achieved an 
envied reputation in baseball and football. Also notable during President Poteat's 
administration was the continued growth of the endowment. 

Beyond these significant material advances, President Poteat brought distinction in 
the form of state and national recognition. A devout Christian, an eloquent speaker, 



16 

and an accomplished scholar, he hecame a national leader in education and probabl 
the foremost Baptist layman in the state. As a distinguished scientist he was anion 
the first to introduce the theory of evolution to his biology classes. The Christia 
commitment in his personal and public life enabled him to defend successfully hi 
views on evolution before the Baptist State Convention in 1922, in a major victory fo 
academic freedom that attracted nationwide attention. Through his influence ant 
that of Wake Forest alumni who supported his view, the North Carolina Legislator 
refused to follow other Southern states in the passage of anti-evolution laws in th 
1920s. 

During the administration of Poteat's successor, Francis Pendleton Gaines ( 1927- 
1930), the academic program continued to improve. In 1930 the Trustees selectee 
Thurman D. Kitchin, dean of the medical school, to fill the presidency. Kitchin was 
member of a family prominent in state and national affairs: one brother, William W 
Kitchin, had served as governor of North Carolina; another, Claude Kitchin, hat 
served as majority leader in the United States House of Representatives. Kitchin s 
twenty-year administration was one of progress in the face of many obstacles- 
Depression, destructive campus fires (one of which destroyed venerable Wait Hall 
the disruption caused by World War II, and a depleted student body. 

Notable accomplishments during this period were the approval in 1936 of the 
School of Law by the American Bar Association and in 1 94 1 the removal of the Schoo 
of Medicine to Winston-Salem, where it undertook full four-year operation in asso 
ciation with the North Carolina Baptist Hospital as the Bowman Gray School o: 
Medicine, named after the benefactor whose bequest made expansion possible. 

World War II brought other changes. Although the College was able to remain 
open, enrollment dropped in 1942 to 474. The College met this crisis by modifying its 
century-old admissions policy and becoming a coeducational institution that year. In 
the post-war period, enrollment mushroomed with the return of the veterans and 
reached a peak of 1,762 by 1949. Just before World War II a $7,000,000 capital 
expansion campaign for buildings and endowment had been launched by President 
Kitchin. The war forced the postponement of construction, but out of the campaign 
came a proposal which offered another war-ridden Wake Forest an opportunity for 
yet another rebirth. The Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation proposed that up to 
$350,000 a year of its income (an amount which has steadily increased over the years) 
be given in perpetuity to the College, provided that the entire College be relocated in 
Winston-Salem and that other friends of the College provide a campus site and 
buildings. In 1946 the Board of Trustees, the Convention, and the Baptist consti- 
tuency of the state accepted the Reynolds proposal. Charles H. Babcock and his wife 
Mary Reynolds Babcock offered a 320-acre tract of their Reynolda estate as a site for . 
the new campus. 

To move an institution over 100 years old from its rural setting 1 10 miles to a new 
campus in an urban area required leadership of great vision, determination, and 
youthful vigor. To succeed President Kitchin, who retired on his sixty-fifth birthday, 
the Trustees in 1950 elected to the presidencv Harold Wayland Tribble, then presi- 
dent of Andover Newton Theological School and a noted Baptist theologian. Presi- 
dent Tribble immediately began to mobilize alumni and friends of the College, and 
the Baptist State Convention, in support of the great transition. 



'• I 



17 

1 In the spring of 1951, William Neal Reynolds and Nancy Reynolds offered an 
'nonymous challenge gift of $2, 000, 000 on condition that the College raise 
3,000,000 by June 30, 1952. The deadline was extended and the challenge met by 
Unuarv 1953. Mr. Reynolds died in September 1951 (the Foundation assumed his 
11,500,000 share of the challenge grant) and he willed Wake Forest $ 1 ,000,000, to be 
1 aid at the time of removal. In recognition of his bequest the new gymnasium was 
1 amed for him. Because of the capital funds received from the Reynolds Foundation, 
he Trustees voted that the library be named the Z. Smith Reynolds Library and the 
dministration building Reynolda Hall. 

> Groundbreaking ceremonies were held in Winston-Salem on October 15, 1951. 
*hen a crowd of more than 20,000 watched President Harry Truman lift the first 
hovel of dirt to begin construction of the new Wake Forest campus. Between 1951 
'nd 1956 fourteen buildings were erected; the removal of the College to its new home 
E /as accomplished in time for the opening of the summer session in 1956. 

During the next eleven years of President Tribble's administration the College 

-xperienced many changes. It had revised its curriculum before moving to the new 

•ampus, offering greater flexibility to students, whose number increased to 3,022. 

he size of the faculty expanded, reducing the student/tearher ratio to fourteen-to- 

'me. 

3 Additional resources came to the College in its new home. In 1954 the will of 
Colonel George Foster Hankins provided over $1,000,000 to be used for scholar- 
ships. In 1956 the Ford Foundation contributed $680,000 to the endowment of the 
indergraduate program and $1,600,000 to the Bowman Gray School of Medicine. 
•\fter the completion of a challenge gift of $3,000,000 offered in 1965, the Founda- 
tion raised its annual contribution to $260,000. The holdings of the University's 
libraries more than tripled, and the Z. Smith Reynolds Library was awarded the 
mcome from an endowment fund of $4,500,000 contributed by the Mary Reynolds 
J iabcock Foundation and Nancy Reynolds. 

'■'■ Graduate work, first offered in 1866 but suspended during the removal program, 
f vas resumed in 1961 with the establishment of the Division of Graduate Studies. In 
K967, recognizing the augmented resources of the College, the Trustees officially 
! fehanged the institution's name to Wake Forest Lmiversity. The Division of Graduate 
■Studies became the Graduate School and the name Wake Forest College was retained 
: is the designation for the undergraduate school. 

' After seventeen years of strenuous effort, President Tribble retired in 1967, 
eaving as his lasting memorial the removal of the College from Wake Forest to 
-Winston-Salem and its changed status from college to university, with enhanced 
esources and academic distinction. As his successor the Trustees chose James Ralph 
kales, former president of Oklahoma Baptist University and former dean of arts and 
sciences at Oklahoma State University. Since his administration began there have 
Deen important new developments. The Guy T. and Clara H. Carswell Scholarship 
Fund, valued at $ 1 ,600,000, was established in 1 967 to undergird the undergraduate 
:ollege. The new Graduate School of Management in 1969 was named in honor of 
Charles H. Babcock. Through the generosity of the Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation 
ind Nancy Reynolds, a building was constructed to house the Babcock School; a 
subsequent gift of $2,000,000 was received from the Mary Reynolds Babcock Found- 



18 

ation for endowment. The James R. Scales Fine Arts Center was occupied in 197' 
marking a major phase of the College's growth in comprehensive liberal arts educ; 
tion. An athletic center and additions to the School of Law building, Cuy T. Carswt 
Hall, have further expanded the physical resources of the Reynolda Campus. 

Wake Forest has expanded its programs as well as its physical facilities. Tli 
University offers study for the baccalaureate degree in over thirty areas listed o 
page 50. Exchange programs with local institutions and with universities abroad ha\ 
further expanded the range of choice and opportunity. In addition, Wake Fore 
maintains residential centers in Venice and London for foreign study within tl 
College curriculum. 

Further development planned for Scales' administration is in the areas of increas 
ing endowment for many parts of the University and completing construction of th 
Fine Arts Center with the addition of a music wing. 

Administration 

Wake Forest College is governed by its Trustees, faculty, and administratioi 
Responsibility for academic administration is delegated by the President and Tru« 
tees to the Provost, who is chief academic officer of the University. The Dean of th 
College is responsible for academic planning and administration in all areas o 
undergraduate life. Collaborating with him are associate and assistant deans and th 
coordinator of student services. Among officers in the area of student services are th 
deans of men and women, who direct residential, social, and cultural life with th 
assistance of a professional staff; and the directors of the University Health Servic 
and the Center for Psychological Services. A complete list of administrative offices 
found in this bulletin beginning on page 169. 

In many administrative areas responsibility is shared, or consultation provided b\ 
the faculty committees listed at the end of this bulletin. 

Buildings and Grounds 

Wake Forest is situated on approximately 320 acres; its phvsical plant consists of 
over thirty buildings, most of which are of modified Georgian architecture and 
constructed of Old Virginia brick trimmed in granite and limestone. The Reynolda 
Gardens annex, consisting of about 150 acres and including Revnolda Woods, 
Revnolda Village, and Revnolda Oardens, is adjacent to the campus. Nearby is the 
Giaylyn Estate, where there are residential foreign language centers for students. 

Wait (Chapel is named in memory of the First president of the College. Its main 
auditorium seats 2,300 and is the home of the Wake Forest Baptist Church; Davis 
Chapel seats 150 and is used by the Church and bv the College for smaller services. 
The Wait Chapel tower contains the Janet Jeffrey Carlile Harris Carillon, an instru- 
ment of forty-seven bells. Wingate Hall, named in honor of President Washington 
Manly Wingate, houses the Department of Music, the Department of Religion, and 
the offices of the University Chaplaincv and Wake Forest Baptist Church. 

Reynolda Hall, across the upper plaza from Wait Chapel, is an administration 
building and student center. Most administrative offices for the Reynolda Campus 
are there, along with the College Union, other student activities, and some class- 



19 



rooms. The Z. Smith Reynolds Library houses the main collection of books and docu- 
ments on the Reynolda Campus. Along with six floors of open stacks, having a 
rapacity for about 1,000, 000 volumes, it has reading and reference rooms for study 
and for some academic offices. 

Winston Hall houses the departments of biology and psychology, Salem Hall the 
departments of chemistry and physics. Both buildings have laboratories as well as 
Classrooms and special research facilities. Harold W. Tribble Hall accommodates the 
humanities and social science departments and has a curriculum materials center, an 
honors seminar room, a philosophy library and seminar room, and a larger lecture 
area, DeTamble Auditorium, with an adjacent exhibition gallery. Instruction in busi- 
ness, accountancy, and mathematics is carried out in Charles H. Babcock Hall, which 
also houses the Babcock Graduate School of Management. The School of Law 
occupies Guy T. Carswell Hall. 

The James R. Scales Fine Arts Center is of contemporary design appropriate to the 
functions of studio art, theatre, and instruction in art history and drama. Off its lobby 
is a large gallery for special exhibitions. In the art wing are spacious studios for 
drawing, painting, sculpture, and printmaking, along with a smaller gallery and 
glassrooms. In the theatre wing are design and production areas and two technically 
complete theatres, the larger of traditional proscenium design and the smaller for 
experimental ring productions. 

| The William N. Reynolds Gymnasium is equipped with classrooms for instruction in 
j physical education, courts for indoor sports, a swimming pool, and offices for the 
■ Department of Phvsicial Education and for military science. Adjacent are tennis 
,courts, sports fields, a track, an Indoor Tennis Center, and the Athletic Center for 
intercollegiate athletics. 

i There are five residence halls for undergraduate men: Kitchin House, Poteat House, 
Davis House, Taylor House, and Huffman Hall. For women there are five residence 
halls: Bostwick, Johnson, Babcock, New Dormitory, and Efird Hall. Just off the main 
campus are twelve apartment buildings for faculty and married students. A town 
house apartment building has also been completed. 

v. 



KS r 




mi 

JL 

The James R. Scales Fine Arts Center 



20 

Student Life 

Student life at the University is designed to offer a wide range of social, cultur; 
religious, and athletic resources to complement academic studies. The University is 
community, and the sense of community is fostered by rich opportunities for perso 
al growth. 

Student Government in the College has executive, legislative, and judicial fun 
tions. The College Union plans, directs, and funds activities. Men's social fraternity 
and women's societies are governed by the Interf raternity and Intersociety Counci 
respectively. A Men's Residence Council and a Women's Residence Council repn 
sent all students who live on campus. There are chapters of the major honor societit 
and professional societies for qualified students, and a number of academic awan 
are made by the University for distinguished student achievement and servici 
Intercollegiate athletics for men and for women and an intramural sports prograi 
are strong, distinguished by tradition and by performance. Religious activities ar 
central to the life of the College and, like campus cultural opportunities, are distiiu 
tive. The University offers a number of additional services to students relating 
their physical and mental health, spiritual growth, and preparation for a meaningh 
life. 

Student Government 

The executive branch of the Student Government is comprised of the four studei 
body officers — president, vice president, secretary, treasurer — and the executh 
advisory committees. Reporting directly to the officers are various committees whic 
work on improving service to students. These committees are open to all studenl 
who wish to serve. 

The Student Legislature is composed of fifty-five student representatives; the vie 
president of the student body serves as speaker. The Legislature represents th 
interests of students in social and academic matters and promotes and funds project 
of benefit to the student body and the larger community. It oversees disbursement o 
funds to student groups and recommends the chartering of newly formed studei 
organizations. Major committees are the Charter Committee, the Student Budget 
Advisory Committee, and the Student Economic Board. 

The Honor Code is an expression of the concern that students be motivated by ideals 
of honor and integrity. It is an integral part of the Student Government as adopted bv 
students and approved by the faculty. Its essence is that each student's word can be 
trusted implicitly and that any violation of a student's word is an offense against the 
whole community. The honor system obligates students neither to give nor receive 
aid on any examination, quiz, or other pledge work; to have complete respect for the 
property rights of others; not to make false or deceiving statements regarding 
academic matters to another member of the University community, nor to give false 
testimony or refuse to pay just debts; and to confront any student who has violated 
the honor system and tell him or her that it is his or her responsibility to report 
himself or herself or face the possibility of being reported to the Honor Council. 

The Honor Council consists of ten members — two co-chairmen selected by the 



21 



[onor Council of the previous year plus two representatives from each class. There 
* "re three non-voting faculty advisers. 

It is the duty of the Honor Council to receive, prefer, investigate, and arrange trial 
roceedings for all charges of violations of the Honor Code. If a student is found 
luilty of premeditated cheating, he or she is immediately suspended or expelled 
om the University. For convictions of lying, stealing, bad debts, interfering with the 
lonor Council, or other forms of cheating, the maximum penalty is expulsion and 
le minimum penalty is probation. Expulsion is automatic upon conviction for a 
;cond offense. All actions of the Honor Council are reported in writing to the Dean 
f the College. 

Any student convicted of violating the Honor Code is ineligible to represent the 
Iniversity in any way until the period of punishment — whether suspension, proba- 
on, or another form — is completed and the student is returned to good standing. A 
:udent who has been suspended can be readmitted to the College only on the 
pproval of the faculty or its Committee on Academic Affairs. During the period of 
uspension the student cannot be certified to another institution as being in good 
canding. 

J The Case Referral Panel receives reports on violations of regulations, conducts 
ecessary investigations, draws up specific charges of violation, hears pleas, and 
efers the matter either to the Director of Housing or to the Judicial Board, as 
ppropriate. 

The Judicial Board is composed of twelve members, at least three men and three 
'/omen, who are elected at large from the student body. It is the duty of the Board to 
leceive, prefer, and try all charges of social misconduct and violations of University 
,; ules and regulations for individual students as well as student organizations not 
"overed by the Honor Council, the Director of Housing, or the Traffic Appeals 
loard. A student who violates these regulations or who behaves in such a way as to 
nring reproach upon himself or herself or upon the University is subject to penalties 
langing from verbal reprimand to suspension on the first offense. For further 
Tfenses, expulsion may occur. 



College Union 



Under the Director of the College Union there are meeting and recreation rooms, 
ounges, offices for student organizations, a coffee house, and an information center. 
jfhe College Union is responsible for scheduling entertainment activities, assisting 
tudent organizations, and providing supporting equipment and services. The Col- 
sge Union board of directors, representing all undergraduate and graduate stu- 
dents, cooperates with the staff in daily operations and supervises the efforts of a 
arge body of student volunteers who develop and present programs which are 
lesigned to complement academic studies. 

Men's and Women's Residence Councils 

The Men's Residence Council includes all residents and encourages students 
toward a comprehensive concept of education, on the principle that learning is not 
restricted to the classroom but occurs in important ways through interaction with 



22 



fellow students and faculty in residence hall life. Each house has its own officers 
carries out its own academic, athletic, and social programs to provide students witf 
opportunity to become actively involved in College life. 

The Women's Residence Council is concerned with nurturing a comprehens 
concept of education. Occasions are provided for discussions and social and sp< 
events. The Women's Residence Council officers are elected by students who li\ 
the residence halls. 

Interfraternity and Intersociety Councils 

The Interfraternity Council is the governing body of twelve social fraternitij 
Alpha Phi Alpha, Alpha Sigma Phi, Delta Sigma Phi, Kappa Alpha, Kappa Sigr 
Lambda Chi Alpha, Omega Psi Phi, Pi Kappa Alpha, Sigma Chi, Sigma Phi Epsili 
Simga Pi, andTheta Chi. The purpose of the council is to maintain a high standard 
conduct and scholarship. A student must have a C average for the previous semes 
or a cumulative C average to be initiated. Bv order of the faculty, students who are 
probation for any reason may not be initiated into any fraternity until the end of th 
probationary period. 

The Intersociety Council is the governing body of five societies for women, in ea 
of which membership is selective: Fideles, Sophs, Steps, Strings, and Thymes. 

Honor Societies and Professional Fraternities 

A number of nationally affiliated honor societies have been established: Alp) 
Epsilon Delta (pte-medicine), Beta Beta Beta (biology), Delta Phi Alpha (Germai 
Delta Sigma Rho/Tau Kappa Alpha (debate). Eta Sigma Phi (classics), Lambda Alp 
(anthropology), National Collegiate Players and Anthony Aston Society (dram; 
Omicron Delta Epsilon (economics). Phi Alpha Theta (history), Pershing Rifles ai 
Scabbard and Blade (military), Phi Beta Kappa, Omicron Delta Kappa, and Mort 
Board. There are student sections of the America Institute of Phvsics and tl 
American Chemical Society; professional fraternities include Phi Alpha Delta ai 
Phi Delta Phi (law). There are also chapters of the national service fraternity Alpl 
Phi Omega and Circle K, as well as an Accounting Society, the American Mai keth 
Association, a Physical Education Club, and a Sociology Club. 

Academic Awards 

i 
The following awards are made annually: the A. D. Ward Medal for the senic 

making the best address at commencement; the/. B. Currin Medal for the best oratio 

on the topic "Christ in Modern Life"; the D. A. Brown Prize to the student whos 

writing most merits recognition; the M. D. Phillips Prize to the outstanding senior i 

Greek or Latin; the John Y. Phillips Prize to the outstanding senior in mathematics; th 

H. Broadus Jones Award to the student whose paper shows greatest insight into th 

works of Shakespeare; the Ruth Foster Campbell Award to the student whose ability i 

the Spanish language and spirit of joyful inquiry into Spanish culture have been mos 

outstanding; the Forrest W. Clonts Award to the outstanding senior in history; the C la iti 

H. Richards Award to the outstanding senior in politics; the John Allen Easley Medal t< 



23 


k outstanding senior in religion; the Lura Bakn Paden Medal to the outstanding 

hior in business; the Wall Street Journal Medal and a year's subscription the the 

tmal to the outstanding senior in finance; the A. M. Pullen and Company Medal to 

i> senior with the highest achievement in accounting; the William E. Speas Award to 

Je outstanding senior in physics; the Carolina Award to the major in biology who 

/ kites the best paper on a subject selected by the national biology society; the Biology 

search Award to the major in biology who does the best piece of original research; 

Ipoteat Award to the student in first year biology who plans to major in biology and 

judged most outstanding. 

ij Intramural Athletics 

'The intramural program operates under the auspices of the Department of Physi- 
[ 1 Education. It provides a variety of competitive activities for students, faculty, and 
iff. There are sports for male, female, and coed participation. Activities usually 
eluded in the intramural program are basketball, cross-country, football, golf, 
indball, racketball, soccer, softball, swimming, tennis, volleyball, water polo, wrest- 
ig, and weight lifting. 

Students occasionally organize club teams for other sports and activities, which are 
St taught or directed by the College, but which are conducted as student organiza- 
ms with the approval of Student Government. These have included rugby, karate, 
b hockey, field hockey, hiking, rappelling, general conditioning, dance, and syn- 
tonized swimming. Students who are interested in a sport not offered through the 
Ibllege may organize themselves and petition the Student Government for approval. 

Intercollegiate Athletics 

Under the Director of Athletics, Wake Forest is a member of the Atlantic Coast 
inference of the National Collegiate Athletic Association and participates in inter- 
lllegiate football, basketball, baseball, golf, tennis, soccer, swimming, cross country, 
fid track. Under the military science staff there is also an intercollegiate program in 

fiery. 

, The full scholarship allowed by the National Collegiate Athletic Association covers 
ition, fees, room, board, and books. Wake Forest offers several special scholarships 
lid awards: the Brian Piccolo Award for the football player judged by the coaching 
aff to best exemplify the qualities of Brian Piccolo during the annual North 
arolina game; the Brian Piccolo Scholarship for the Chicago-area high school football 
ayer entering Wake Forest who best exemplifies the qualities of Brian Piccolo; the 

^nold Palmei : Award for the Wake Forest Athlete of the Year, as judged by the 
' onogram Club; the Buddy Worsham Scholarship for one golfer or more; the John R. 
nott Scholarship for one golfer or more 

Under the Director of Women's Athletics, Wake Forest is a member of the Assocra- 
m of Intercollegiate Athletics for Women and participates in basketball, field 
Dckey, golf, tennis, volleyball, and cross country. In addition, women are eligible for 
le intercollegiate swimming team. 

The full scholarship allowed by the Association of Intercollegiate Athletics for 
'omen covers tuition, fees, room, and board. Wake Forest offers scholarships for 
omen in golf, tennis, basketball, and volleyball. 



24 

Religious Activities 

The Campus Ministry provides a variety of religious activities, including Thursd 
morning worship in Davis Chapel. In addition to seasonal celebrations through* 
the liturgical year, there are retreats, Bible-study and discussion groups, and b( 
independent and church-related social service in the larger community. Bapti 
Catholic, Episcopal and Methodist chaplains represent their faiths and particip; 
jointly in sponsoring activities. Wake Forest Baptist Church meets for weekly worsh 
in Wait Chapel and embraces students, faculty, and members of the larger comma 
ity. Membership is open without restriction to all who seek its ministry. 

The Ecumenical Institute sponsors lectures, colloquia, and publications whi 
foster dialogue among clergy and lay members of Catholic, Jewish, and Protestai 
faiths. Most are open to students and to others in the community. 

Cultural Activities 

The University Theatre presents four major productions and several lab pla 
annually, employing faculty, student, and visiting professional directors. Each ye; 
the College Union, with the assistance of the University Theatre, sponsors a music 
dinner theatre, directed and performed by students. WFDD-FM broadcasts yea 
round to the campus and Piedmont North Carolina as an affiliate of National Publ 
Radio. In addition to student announcers, producers, and technicians, it has a sma 
professional staff. Intercollegiate debate at Wake Forest has a long record of excel 
ence, and the College hosts two annual debate tournaments, the Novice and the Dixi 
Classic. 

Student publications include Old Gold and Black, a weekly newspaper; The Student, 
literary magazine; and the yearbook The Howler. Challenge is a student-initiate 
biennial symposium on contemporary affairs which attracts major speakers around 
central theme of national importance. In addition, the College Union sponsors 
major speaker series throughout the academic year, and departments in the Colleg 
engage specialists for other series. The Institute of Literature is a program of writers* 
critics, and scholars in English, classical languages, German, and Romance languages 
The Hester Philosophy Seminar is an annual colloquium devoted to the major problem 
of philosophy and their impact on the Christian faith and is a joint undertaking of tin 
Department of Philosophy and the Ecumenical Institute. The Robinson Lectures art 
held biennially and are administered by the Department of Religion. The Depart 
ment of Psychology sponsors a colloquium series throughout the academic year. 

Student musicians perform for academic credit in the Choral Union, the Concer 
Choir, the Opera Workshop, the University Symphony, the Demon Deacon March 
ing Band, the Symphonic Wind Ensemble, the Concert Band, the Varsity Pep Band 
two Jazz Ensembles, the Percussion Ensemble, the Woodwind Quintet, and the Brass 
Quintet. 

Under the Director of Concerts, major concerts in the Artists Series are performed 
in Wait Chapel Chapel by orchestras and artists from around the world. Visiting 
dance soloists and companies are scheduled in the James R. Scales Fine Arts Center, 
and recitals are played by both students and guest carillonneurs on the Janet Jeffrey 
Carlile Harris Carillon. Students in the Chapel Bell Guild play English handbells for 



25 

mvocations and services in Wait Chapel. The Department of Music sponsors per- 
.rmances by faculty members, students, and visiting artists in most areas of applied 
vusic instruction. 

i All concerts are open to students and to others in the community. 

1 In addition to studio instruction in the Department of Art, visiting painters, 

i ulptors, and printmakers teach on campus and at the nearby Southeastern Center 

or Contemporary Art, sponsored jointly by the University and the Center. Reynolda 

luouse has a regular program of instruction in art history related to its special 

ollection in American art. The College Union has an expanding collection of 

^temporary works of art, under student administration and exhibited in Reynolda 

fall and elsewhere on campus. The T. J. Simmons Collection of paintings, etchings, 

thographs, and sculpture is also distributed for permanent campus display. An 

:tive group of student photographers exhibits its own work and that of professional 

hotographers in the gallery adjacent to DeTamble Auditorium. Cultural resources 

1 the community, in addition to Reynolda House and the Southeastern Center for 

contemporary Art, include the historic restored Moravian village of Old Salem, the 

luseum of Early Southern Decorative Arts, the North Carolina School of the Arts 

:hd its associated professional performing companies in theatre, dance, and music, 

;nd the Winston-Salem Symphony and Chorale. Folk art, professional art, and crafts 

jiirs are frequent. 

Educational Planning and Placement 

1 The Office for Educational Planning and Placement (Room 7 Reynolda Hall) 
ffers counseling and consultation over the entire range of educational planning, 
assistance is available in the choice of an academic major and in approaching other 
decisions that relate to professional or career commitments. Undergraduate and 
| raduate students are invited to take advantage of these services. The office provides 
' xtensive library resources for use by students involved in the planning and place- 
ment activities. Interviews with potential employers may be arranged through the 
ffice. 

1 Center for Psychological Services 

i- 

Located in Reynolda Hall, the Center for Psychological Services offers psycho- 
logical counseling, testing, and research services to the University community. 

3 Student Health Service 

: The Student Health Service is located in Kitchin House and provides primary care 
'ervices, including general health maintenance, diagnostic and treatment proce- 
1 lures, and referral to specialists. It is open when residence halls are in operation and 

equires a health information questionaire on file for all students. The services of the 
•clinical staff are covered by tuition; there are additional charges for injections, 

indications, laboratory tests, special physical examinations, and bed care. 



26 

Procedures 

All students are responsible for familiarizing themselves with the portions oj this bulletin wh 
pertain to their course oj study. Statements concerning courses and expenses are not to 
regarded as irrevocable contracts between the student and the institution.The University reser 
the right to change the schedule of classes and the cost oj instruction at any time within 
student's term of residence. 

Admission 

Candidates for admission must furnish evidence of maturity and educatioi 
achievement. The Committee on Admissions carefully considers the applican 
academic records, scores on tests, and evidence of character, motivation, goals, ar 
general fitness for study in the College. The secondary school program of t 
applicant must establish a commitment to the kind of broad liberal education 1 
fleeted in the academic requirements of the College. 

Admission as a freshman normally requires graduation from an accredited secoi 
dary school with a minimum of sixteen units of high school credit. These shoul 
include four units in English, three in mathematics, two in history and social studie 
two in a single foreign language, and one in the natural sciences. An applicant wh 
presents at least twelve units of differently distributed college preparatory study ca 
be considered. A limited number of applicants may be admitted without the hig 
school diploma, with particular attention given to ability, maturity, and motivatioi 

Application 

An application is secured from the Office of Admissions in person or by ma. 
(7305 Reynolda Station, Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27109). It should be com 
pleted and returned to that office, if possible no later than February 1 for the fal 
semester. Most admissions decisions for the fall semester are made by March 1, will 
prompt notification of applicants. For the spring semester application should b( 
completed and returned, if possible no later than October 15. Except in emergenc j 
the final date for applying for the fall semester is August 5 and for the spring 
semester January 1. Application on this last-date basis is primarily for non-residenti. 
students. 

The admission application requires records and recommendations directly from 
secondary school officials. It also requires test scores, preferably from the senior year 
on the Scholastic Aptitude Test of the College Entrance Examination Board. An 
accompanying Achievement Test is optional. A $20 fee to cover the cost of processing 
must accompany an application. It cannot be applied to later charges for accepted 
students or refunded for others. The University reserves the right to reject any application 
without explanation. 

A $100 admission deposit is required of all students accepted and must be sent to 
the Office of Admissions no later than three weeks following notice of acceptance. It 
is credited toward first semester fees and is refunded in the event of cancellation of 
application by the student, provided written request for refund is received by the 






27 



Ice of Admissions no later than May 1 for the fall semester or November 1 for the 
"ing semester. (Students notified of acceptance after May 1 for the fall semester or 
I vember 1 for the spring semester should make the admission deposit within two 
I sks of notification.) Deposits made after May 1 and November 1 are not refund- 
it. Failure to make the admission deposit is taken as cancellation of application by 
t student. No deposit is required for summer session enrollment. 



Early Decision 

\n Early Decision plan is available to well qualified high school students who 
:ide by the close of their junior year that their first college choice is Wake Forest. 
Early Decision agreement is required with the application, which is sent to the 
fice of Admissions after completion of the junior year or by late October of the 
lior year. Along with high school record, recommendations, and scores on the 
aolastic Aptitude Test, at least one Achievement lest, especially in English com- 
sition, is strongly recommended. 

Early Decision applicants are notified of acceptance no later than November 1 for 
[i fall semester, and the admission deposit is required by January 1. Applicants not 
mitted are asked to submit a senior year Scholastic Aptitude Test score and first 
tester senior year grade record, or are advised to apply elsewhere. 



Admission of Handicapped Students 

Wake Forest College will consider the application of any student on the basis of his 
her personal and academic merit, regardless of physical handicap. Though the 
mpus has several levels, a system of ramps and elevators makes all its programs 
ailable to those in wheelchairs or with limited mobility. The University will gladly 
dst handicapped students in making arrangements to meet special needs. Students 
•io seek further information should consult the Admissions Office or the Univer- 
y's Office of Equal Opportunity. 



Advanced Placement and CLEP 

Advanced Placement credit for college level work done in high school is available 
l the basis of the Advanced Placement Examination of the College Entrance 
' (animation Board and supplementary information. Especially well-qualified appli- 
j nts for advanced standing may also be exempted from some basic and divisional 
: >urses with credit on the authorization of the department concerned. Credit by 
lvanced standing is treated in the same manner as credit transferred from another 
allege. 

Under certain conditions especially well prepared applicants may be granted 
nited college credit through the subject tests of the College Level Examination 
-ogram (CLEP) of the Educational Testing service. Such credit may be assigned with 
e approval of the department concerned. 



28 






Transfer Credit 



The number of transfer students who can be admitted each year depends upon tl 
availability of space in the sophomore and junior classes. An applicant for admissk 
who has attended another college must be a graduate of a standard junior college ( 
furnish a certificate of honorable dismissal stating eligibility in all respects to enter tl 
college last attended, and must have an overall average of at least C on all college woi 
attempted. A student who is admitted from another college before fully meeting tl 
prescribed admissions requirements for entering freshmen must remove the et 
trance conditions during the first year at Wake Forest. 

The writing of transfer students is checked during the orientation period eac 
semester, and students whose writing is deficient are given a composition condition. Fc 
removal of a composition condition the student is required to take English 1 1 durii 
the first semester for which he or she registers following the assignment of the 
Removal of the deficiency is prerequisite to graduation. 

Courses satisfactorily completed in other accredited colleges are accepted subje( 
to faculty approval. In general, no credit is allowed for courses not found in the Wak 
Forest curriculum. The minimum residence requirement for a baccalaureate degre 
is two academic years, the senior and one other. 

Expenses 

Statements concerning expenses are not to be regarded as forming an irrevocable contrac 
between the student and the University. The costs of instruction and other services outlined herei 
are those in effect on the date of publication of this bulletin, and the University reserves the righ 
to change without notice the cost of instruction and other services at any time. 

An admission deposit of $100, which is applied toward tuition and fees for th 
semester for which the student has been accepted, is required to complete admission 
Charges are due in full on August 1 for the fall semester and December 15 for the 
spring semester. Faculty regulations require that student accounts be settled in fub 
before the student is entitled to receive a grade report, transcript, or diploma, or tc 
register for the following semester or term. 

Tuition 

Per Semester Per Year 

Full-Time (twelve or more credits) $1,800 $3,600 

Part-Time $110 per credit 

Students enrolled in the College for full-time residence credit are entitled to full 
privileges regarding libraries, laboratories, athletic contests, concerts, publications, 
the College Union, the University Theatre, and the Health Service. Part-time stu- 
dents are entitled to the use of the libraries and laboratories but not to the other 
privileges mentioned above. They may secure a part-time student ID card, admis- 
sions to games and concerts, and publications by paving an activitv fee of $50 per 
semester. 



29 

Room Charges 

Per Semester Per Year 

; ouble occupancy $270-$285 $540-$570 

IMost rooms available for first year students are $270 per semester for men and 
285 for women. Other room rentals range from $235 to $360. 

i 

( Food Services 

A cafeteria, soda shop, and table service dining room are located in Reynolda Hall. 

£ oard plans are available for $750, $880, and $1,000 per year. The format of these 

Mans is a credit card system in which the student is charged only for the amount of 

hod purchased at the time it is purchased. The plan may be used at anv University 

ood Services facility, and it allows a great deal of flexibility for eating off campus. 

Freshmen living in dormitories (ire required to participate in one of the board plans. 

' Other Charges 

Admission application fee of $20 is required with each application tor admission to 
over the cost of processing and is non-refundable. 

Admission deposit of $100 is required of each student entering for the first time or 
eturning after a period of non-attendance and must be sent to the Director of 
Admissions within three weeks after acceptance for admission or readmission. The 
deposit is credited to the student's charges for the semester for which he or she has 
oeen accepted for admission. It is refunded if the Director of Admissions is notified in 
writing prior to May 1 for the fall semester and November 1 for the spring semester 
(r>f cancellation of plans to enter the College. 

i Applied music fees are required in addition to tuition for students enrolling for individual 
Iclass study in applied music in the Department of Music and are payable in the Office 
ijf the Treasurer. The fee for one credit hour of instruction per semester is $75 and 
for two credit hours per semester is $120. Practice fees are $15 or $18 for organ 
practice, $7 or $10 for piano practice, and $5 or $7 for other instrument practice for 
one or two hours a day. 

Graduation fee of $20 is required of all students who are candidates for degrees. 

Hospital bed and board charges are made when the student is confined to the Student 
Health Service, at a rate of $37.50 per day. An additional charge is made for special 
services and expensive drugs. Since most insurance companies do not cover admis- 
sions to a university hospital or infirmary, students are urged to arrange for the 
student insurance which covers these charges. The student insurance premium is 
! usually under $120 per year. A $2.00 charge is added to overdue bills. 

Key deposit of $5 is required for each key issued to a residence hall room and is 
refunded when the key is returned. 

Late registration fee of $10 is charged to students registering after the dates set by the 
faculty. 

Library fines are charged for lost books and for violation of other library regulations 
and are payable in the library. 



30 






Advance tuition deposit of $100 is required, at a date set by the Office of the Treasurer! 
of students enrolled in the spring semester who expect to return for the fall semestei4 
It is credited to the student's University charges and is refunded if the Treasurer ii 
notified in writing prior to June 1 that the student will not return. 

Room change fee of $5 is charged for authorized room changes made after Februai \ 
15 in the spring semester. The fine is $20 for any unauthorized change. 

Special examination fee of $2.50 is required for each examination taken to remove ; 
course condition. 

Student apartment rental is payable at $108 per month. 

Motor vehicle registration and traffic fines are $40 and $4 to $10, respectively. Al 
students operating a vehicle on campus (including student apartments and tin 
Graylyn Estate) must register vehicles they are operating day or night, whether or no 
owned by the operator. All vehicle registrations must be completed within twentv 
four hours from the first time the vehicle is brought to campus. Fines are assessec' 
against students violating parking regulations, copies of which are obtainable f Voir 
the University Police Office. Proof of ownership must be presented when applying 
for vehicle registration. 

Transcripts of a student's record are issued at a cost of $2 each. 

Refunds 

During the academic year, all students, full- and part-time, receive tuition refunds 
according to the following schedule. This policy applies to students dropping courses 
as well as those withdrawing. Withdrawals must be official and students must return 
their ID cards before claiming refunds. There is no refund of room rent. 

Number of Weeks Percentage of Total Tuition 

Attendance to be Refunded 

1 Total Tuition Less $100 

2 75 percent 

3 50 percent 

4 25 percent 

Housing 

All unmarried freshmen students are required to live in residence halls, except (1 ) 
when permission is granted by the Dean of Men or the Dean of Women for the 
student to live with parents or a relative in the Winston-Salem area or (2) by special 
arrangement when space is not available on campus or (3) if the student has lost 
residence hall space because of a room contract violation. Married students are not 
usually allowed to live in residence halls except when permitted by the Dean of Men 
or the Dean of Women. Residence halls are supervised bv the Director of Housing, 
the Directors of Residence Life, head residents, and assistants under the direction of 
the Dean of Men and the Dean of Women. 

The following charges per year applv for each student in the residence halls: in 
Kitchin House, Poteat House, Davis House, Taylor House, Huffman Hall, and Efird 
Hall, $430 for triple rooms, $470 for small double rooms, $540 for large double 



31 

)oms, and $670 for single rooms; in Johnson and Bostwick Residence Halls, $570 
Sr double rooms and $680 for single rooms; in Babcock Residence Hall, $650 for 

ouble rooms and $720 for single rooms; in New Dormitory, $720 for double rooms; 

i each of four town house apartments, $720 per occupant; at Graylyn Estate, $720 
l er occupant. For each of the fifty-six married student apartments the charge is $108 

er month. 



Academic Calendar 

|i The academic calendar of the College includes a fall semester ending before 
Christmas, a spring semester beginning in January and ending in May, and a summer 
jession. Courses offered in the fall semester usually meet for approximately fifteen 
,v'eeks. During the spring semester some courses meet on a fifteen-week schedule as 
,n the fall, some meet for four weeks (normally during January), and others meet for 
die remaining eleven weeks of the semester. A student may enroll for fifteen-week 
courses only or for four-week and eleven-week courses only, or under certain 
conditions may combine courses from the two tracks during the same spring 
emester. 



] Orientation and Advising 

A three-dav orientation period for new students in the College precedes registra- 
tion for the fall semester. An academic adviser who is either a member of the faculty 
)r an upperclassman in the peer-advising program provides guidance during and 
Detween registration periods throughout the student's freshman and sophomore 
years. Advisers meet with students both individually and in small groups. Students 
are encouraged to take the initiative in arranging additional meetings at any time they 
feel a need for advice or other assistance. The adviser suggests and approves courses 
jf instruction until the student declares a major in a field of study at the end of the 
sophomore year. At that time a new adviser is assigned from the department or 
departments concerned. 

Registration 

A two-day registration period for all students in the College opens the fall semester 
and the spring semester. Registration involves (1) payment of all tuition and fees in 
cull to the Treasurer, (2) obtaining a summary of prior record from the Registrar, (3) 
:onsultation with the academic adviser, (4) sectioning of classes by departmental 
representatives, and (5) verification of registration cards with class schedules by the 
Registrar. 

A four- week course with a value of four credits constitutes a normal full-time 
course load for the four-week term. Students enrolling for a four-week course that 
meets primarily of f campus may not enroll for a regular fifteen-week course during 
the same semester. Students enrolling for a four-week course on the campus may, if 
the adviser recommends it, enroll at the same time for one regular fifteen-week course 



32 

(three, Jour, or five credits) only. Certain one-credit courses, such as music ensemble ( 
physical education, may be included in addition at the discretion of student ai 
adviser. Students or advisers who encounter extraordinary problems in plannirfl 
schedules for the spring semester may consult the Office of the Dean of the CollegJ 

Classification 

Classification of students by class standing and as lull-time or part-time is calu 
lated in terms of credits. Most courses in the College have a value of lour credits, hi 
others vary from one credit to five. The normal load for a full-time student 
eighteen credits per semester; a slightly heavier load is permitted under certai 
circumstances. Twelve credits per semester constitute minimum full-time registr; 
tion. (Recipients of North Carolina Legislative Tuition Grants must be enrolled for ; 
least fourteen credits each semester — by the tenth day of classes. Recipients d 
veteran benefits, grants from state government, and other governmental aid mui 
meet the guidelines of the appropriate agencies.) A student may not register fo 
fewer than twelve credits without specific permission from the Committee o: 
Academic Affairs to register as a part-time student. For the January term the norm; 
load is one four-credit course; with the academic adviser's approval a student ma 
also register concurrently for a fifteen-week course. 

A full-time student in the fall semester of any year may not be a part-time student n 
the spring semester immediately following. Any student who petitions for part-tim 
status within the semester in which he or she wishes to gain such status is not eligibl 
for a tuition refund. 

The requirements for classification after the freshman year are as follows: sopho 
more — the removal of all entrance conditions and the completion of not fewer thar 
twenty-nine credits toward a degree, with a minimum of fifty-eight grade points 
junior — the completion of not fewer than sixtv credits toward a degree, with a 
minimum of 120 grade points; senior — not fewer than 108 credits toward a degree 
with a minimum of 216 grade points. 

Class Attendance 

Attendance regulations place the responsibility for class attendance on the student 
who is expected to attend classes regularly and punctually. One of the most vital 
aspects of the residential college experience is attendance in the classrooms; its value 
cannot be fully measured by testing procedures alone. Students are considered 
sufficiently mature to appreciate the necessity of regular attendance, to accept this 
personal responsibility, to demonstrate the self-discipline essential for such perform- 
ance, and to recognize and accept the consequences of failure to attend. The instruc- 
tor is privileged to refer to the Dean of the College for suitable action students who 
are deemed to be causing their work or that of the class to suffer because of absence or 
lateness. Any student who does not attend classes regularly or who demonstrates 
other evidence of academic irresponsibility is subject to such disciplinary action as the 
Committee on Academic Affairs may prescribe, including immediate suspension 
from the College . 



33 

-The Office of the Dean of the College maintains a list of students who have been 
I ent from class because of illness certified by the Student Health Service, because of 
llier extenuating circumstances, or as authorized representatives of the college 
Ijose names have been submitted by appropriate officials forty-eight hours in 
i i/ance of the hour when the absences are to begin. Such absences are considered 
( used and a record of them is available to the student's instructor upon request. 
I e instructor determines whether work missed can be made up. 



i Auditing Classes 

' <Vhen space is available after the registration of regularly enrolled students, others 
Buy request permission of the instructor to enter the class as auditors. No additional 
( irge is made to full-time students in the College; for others the fee is $60 per 
( use, and permission of the Dean of the College, as well as that of the instructor, is 
1 |uired. An auditor is subject to attendance regulations and to other conditions 
i oosed by the instructor. Although an auditor receives no credit, a notation oiaudit 
i nade on the final grade report and entered on the record of regularly enrolled 
« dents who have met the instructor's requirements. An audit course may not be 
( inged to a credit course, and a credit course may not be changed to an audit course. 



Dropping a Course 

The last day in each term for dropping a class without a grade of F is listed in the 
(iendar in the front of this catalog. A student who wishes to drop any course before 
Rs date must consult the Registrar and his or her faculty adviser. After this date, the 
9 dent who wishes to drop a course must consult his or her faculty adviser, the course 
i tructor, and the Dean of the College. If the Dean approves the request, he 
ndiorizes the student to discontinue the course. Except in the case of an emergency, 
i :■• grade in the course will be recorded as F. 

f, at any time, a student shall drop any course without prior, written approval of 
i • Dean, the student will be subject to academic probation for the following semester 
1 to such other penalities as the Committee on Academic Affairs of the faculty may 

pose. 



Withdrawal from the College 

■A student who finds it necessary to withdraw from the College must do so through 
) : Office of the Dean of the College. With the approval of the Dean of the College, 
grades are recorded for the student for that semester, but the student's standing in 
.irses at the time of withdrawal is taken into consideration when readmission is 
lght. If withdrawal is for academic reasons, failing grades may be assigned in all 
-irses in which the student is doing unsatisfactory work. A student who leaves the 
liege without officially withdrawing is assigned failing grades in all current 
irses, and the unofficial withdrawal is recorded. 



34 



Examinations 

Final examinations are given at regularly scheduled times. All examinations 
conducted in accordance with the honor system adopted by the student body ; 
approved by the faculty. Under it the student is expected to refrain from unfain 
in any form and to report to the Honor Council any student he or she knows tc 
cheating. Examinations are turned in with a signed statement that no aid has hi 
given or received. 



Grading 

For most courses carrying undergraduate credit there are five final and I 
conditional grades: A (exceptionally high achievement). H (superior), C (satisfactory) 
(passing but unsatisfactory), E (conditional failure), F (failure), and I (incomplete). 

Grade of E. The grade of E entitles the student to reexamination at any regu 
examination period within a year, or during the first week of the fall semester 
permit for reexamination must be obtained in advance from the Registrar, and 
grade higher than D may be assigned as a result of reexamination. A student W 
does not remove a conditional failure by reexamination must repeat the course 
obtain credit for it. 

Grade of I. The grade of I may be assigned only when because of illness or so 
other emergency a student does not complete the work of the course. If the w< 
recorded as I is not completed within thirty days after the student enters for his or 1 
next semester, the grade automatically becomes F. 

Grade Points. Grades are assigned grade points for the computation of acadei 
averages, class standing, and eligibility for continuation, as follows: for each credii 
A, four points; for each credit of B, three points; for each credit of C, two points, 
each credit of D, one point; for each credit of E or F, no points. 

Pass/Fail. To encourage students to venture into Fields outside their major areas 
competence and concentration, the College makes available the option, under cert; 
conditions, of registering in courses on a Pass/Fail basis rather than for a letter gra< 
Courses taken under the Pass/Fail option yield full credit when satisfactorily co 
pleted, but whether passed or not they are not computed in the grade point averas. 




Groves Stadium 



35 

1 ^ student may count toward the degree no more than twenty-four credits taken on 
c ass/Fail basis. Freshmen and sophomores are eligible only for most four-week 
k irses offered on a Pass/Fail basis, as well as for certain other courses offered only on 
i ass/Fail basis. A student may during the junior and senior years only elect up to a 
It il of sixteen credits on a Pass/Fail basis, but no more than five credits in a given 
5 lester. Courses used to fulfill basic, divisional, or major requirements may not be 
t en on a Pass/Fail basis unless they are offered only on that basis. Courses in the 
l jor(s) not used for satisfying major requirements may be taken on a Pass/Fail basis 
( v if the department of the major does not specify otherwise. 

Grade Reports and Transcripts 

\ mid-term report and a final report of grades are issued to students by the 
Lgistrar in the fall and spring semesters. A final report of grades is issued for each 
,nmer term, 
j^opies of a student's cumulative record are issued by the Registrar, but only on the 

ttten authorization of the student and payment of S2 per transcript. 

Dean's List 



The Dean's List is issued by the Dean of the College at the end of the fall and spring 
nesters. It includes all full-time students in the College who have a grade point 
;rage of 3.0 or better for the semester and who have earned no grade below C 
ring the semester. 

Graduation Distinctions 

Graduation distinctions are determined by the grade point system. A degree 
adidate with a total average of not less than 3.80 for all courses attempted is 
aduated with the distinction summit cum laude. A candidate with a total average of 
It less than 3.50 for all courses attempted is graduated with the distinction magna 
m laude. A candidate with a total average of not less than 3.00 for all courses 
empted is graduated with the distinction cum laude. Particular conditions apply to 
tdents transferring from other colleges or participating in combined degree pro- 
ams. Details are available in the Office of the Registrar. 

Repetition of Courses 

A student may not repeat for credit a course for which he or she has already 
ceived a grade of C or higher. 

Probation 

A student is responsible at all times for knowing his or her academic standing. Any 
idem who at the end of the fall semester does not have the grade average normally 
quired for continuation at the end of the following spring semester is automatically 
academic probation. 



36 



Any student who is placed on probation because of Honor Code or conduct cd 
violations is placed on such special academic probation as the Committee on Acade 1 
ic Affairs imposes. The Committee on Academic Affairs may at any time place 
probation a student whose academic performance or social behavior is inconsisU 
with what the committee deems to be in the best interest of the student or the Colles 

Any student convicted of violating the Honor Code is ineligible to represent I 
College in any way until the period of suspension or probation is completed and f 
student is returned to good standing. Students who are on probation for any reas 
may not be initiated into any fraternity until the end of their probationary periq 

Requirements for Continuation 

Students are responsible for knowing their academic status and whether they a 
meeting the minimum academic requirements for continuation in the College. K 
quirements for continuation are determined by the bulletin under which the stude 
expects to graduate. 

On the basis of their cumulative records at the end of the spring semester, th< 
students are academically ineligible to enroll for the following fall (1) who h;i 




Herman E. Eure, assistant professor of biology, directs students in laboratory. 



37 

tempted fewer than fifty-four credits in all colleges and universities attended and 

; jive a total grade point average of less than 1 .35 on work attempted for a grade in the 

, allege; (2) who have attempted as many as fifty-four but fewer than ninety-eight 

■ edits and have a total grade point average of less than 1 .65 on work attempted for a 

,ade in the College; (3) who have attempted as many as ninety-eight but fewer than 

,15 credits and have a total grade point average of less than 1.85 on work attempted 

jr a grade in the College; (4) who have attempted 135 credits or more and have a 

,tal grade point average of less than 1.90 on work attempted for a grade in the 

j allege. Non-credit courses, courses taken Pass/Fail, and CLEP and Advanced Place- 

ent credit are not computed in the total grade point average. 

Ordinarily a student who is ineligible to continue in the College may attend the first 

mmer term and if successful in raising the total grade point average to the required 

inimum may enroll for the following fall semester. The student may attend the 

cond summer term if unsuccessful in the first, and if successful then may enroll for 

' e following spring semester. If unsuccessful in meeting the minimum requirements 

' the end of the second summer term, the student may apply for readmission no 

'iirlier than the following summer session. 

1 Under exceptionally extenuating circumstances beyond the control of the student, 
<\d after consultation with the Dean of the College, the student may appeal the 
pregoing eligibility requirements before the Committee on Academic Affairs. The 
' ommittee on Academic Affairs may also suspend at the end of any semester or term 
ly student whose record for that term has been unsatisfactory, particularly with 
:gard to the number of courses passed and failed, or any student who has not 
tended class regularly or has otherwise ignored the rules and regulations of the 
iollege. 

Requirements for Readmission 

A student seeking readmission to the College must meet the minimum academic 
xmirements for continuation. However, a student who has not met the require- 
lents (1) may apply for admission to the summer session only, (2) may apply for 
^admission after an absence from the College of at least a year and a half, (3) may 
oply for readmission after less than a year and a half if enrolled in another college or 
niversity, or (4) may apply for readmission if the failure to meet minimum require- 
ments was due to exceptionally extenuating circumstances beyond the control of the 
udent. 

Senior Conditions 

A candidate for graduation in the final semester who receives a grade of E in the 
r revious semester may apply to the Registrar for reexamination thirty days after the 
pening of the final semester but not less than thirty days before its close. All 
mditions must be removed not less than thirty days before the end of the last 
:mester or term of the student's graduation year. The name of a candidate who has a 
mdition after that date is dropped from the list of candidates. A candidate who 
'ceives a grade of E in the final semester or term of the graduation year is not 
lowed reexamination before the next examination period. 



38 



Scholarships and Loans 



Any student admitted to Wake Forest College who demonstrates financial need w 
receive assistance commensurate with that need. 

Bv regulation of the Board of Trustees, all financial aid must be approved by tl 
Committee on Scholarships and Student Aid. Applications should be requested fro 
the committee at 7305 Reynolda Station, Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27 K)' 
Scholarships supported by funds of the College are not granted to students enrolle 
in other schools of the University. To receive consideration for financial aid, tl 
applicant must either be enrolled in the College or have been accepted for admissioi 
The financial aid program comprises institutional, state, and federal scholarshi] 
loan, and work funds. Full-time students are eligible to apply for any of these fund 
Half-time students are eligible to apply for federal funds. Half- and part-tim 
students are eligible to apply for limited institutional funds. 

Need is a factor in the awarding of most financial aid, and each applicant must file 
financial statement with the application for financial aid. After reviewing the stai 
dard financial analysis, the Committee on Scholarships determines aid awards, an 
aid is credited, by semester, to the student's account in the Office of the Treasure 
The Committee on Scholarships reserves the right to revoke financial aid for unsati 
factory' academic achievement or for violation of University regulations or federa 
state, or local laws. To be eligible lor renewal of aid, a student must remain enrolle 
on a normal full-time basis and be in good standing, making satisfactory progre! 
toward a degree. The committee does not award institutional scholarships to studeri 
earning less than a 2.0 grade average on all work attempted at Wake Forest. 

Scholarships 

The Guy T. Carswell Scholarships, made possible by and established in honor of th 
late Guy T. Carswell and his wife (Mara Carswell of Charlotte, North Carolina, can 
an annual value ranging from a minimum stipend of S 1 ,500 to a maximum stipend < 
$5,000, witfi awards for more than $1,500 determined on the basis of need. 
Carswell Scholar must be a student applying to the College who possesses outstandiri 
qualities of intellect and leadership. Up to forty scholars are selected annually. 

The George Foster Hankins Scholarships for Freshmen, made possible bv the late Colone 
George Foster Hankins of Lexington, North Carolina lor residents of North Carolin 
or children of alumni residing in other states, with preference given to residents < 
Davidson County, North Carolina, have a value up to $5,000. 

The George Foster Hankins Scholarships /or Upper classmen for students who have bee 
enrolled for at least one semester, with preference given to applicants from Davidso 
County, North Carolina, vary in value according to need. 

The Alcoa Foundation Scholarship, donated bv the Alcoa Foundation, is available to ; 
freshman from the Piedmont area who is majoring in chemistry. It is awarded on tin 
basis of need for $2,000. 

The Alpha Phi Omega Scholarships, established by the Kappa Theta Chapter of Alph< 
Phi Omega, is made available in alternate years to a freshman who presents evidence 
of need and an excellent high school record for a minimum of $200. 



39 

The Camilla Artom Fund jar Italian Studies was established in 1976 in honor of Dr. 

■"" "Jamillo Artom, professor of biochemistry from 1939 to 1969. Scholarship aid is 

nade available, usually to one or two students each semester, to assist with their 

■xpenses. Well qualified students who can demonstrate need are eligible to apply. 

[interested persons should apply in the Office of the Provost.) 

Basic Educational Opportunity Grants are available to undergraduate students with 

exceptional financial need who require these grants in order to attend college, for a 

I alue of from $200 to $1,800 per year. The amount of assistance a student may 

eceive depends upon need, taking into account financial resources and the cost of 

tttending the college chosen. 

The Eliza Pratt Brown Scholarship, donated by the late Junius Cabin Brown of 
Vladison, North Carolina in honor of his wife Eliza Pratt Brown, is used to assist 
leedv, worthy, and deserving students from North Carolina, with preference given 
:o students from the town of Madison and Rockingham County, for a maximum of 
,$2,000. 

The J. G. Carroll Memorial Athletic Scholarship, donated in memory of J. G. Carroll, 
former associate professor of mathematics, is made to a deserving athlete who is not 
an a regular athletic scholarship, for a value of approximately $100. 

The James Lee Carver Scholarship, donated by Jean Freeman Carver with her children 
James Lee Carver II and Elizabeth Jeanine Carver in memory of her husband James 
|Lee Carver, is for deserving and promising students who demonstrate a need for 
financial assistance, with preference given to students from the Oxford Orphanage 
in Oxford, North Carolina, for a value of approximately $300. 

The College Scholarships, in the amount of $100 to $3,300 each, are available to 
freshmen and upperclassmen presenting satisfactory academic records and evidence 
of need. 

The (). B. Crowell Memorial Scholarship Fund, donated by Louise T. Crowell of 
I Hendersonville, North Carolina in memory of her husband O. B. Crowell, is awarded 
on the basis of character, need, and promise for a value of approximately $600. 

The Lecausey P. and Lula H. Freeman Scholarship, donated by Mr. and Mrs. G. H. 
Singleton of Raleigh, North Carolina in memory of the parents of Mrs. Singleton, is 
i available to a freshman, sophomore, or junior whose home is within the West Chowan 
Baptist Association of North Carolina, with preference given to Bertie County 
students, on the basis of need and ability. Residents of the Roanoke Association may 
f be considered for the scholarship, which is renewable on the basis of need and ability 
•except for the senior year, for a value of approximately $200. 

The Charles A. Frueaufj Scholarships are provided annually by the Charles A. 
j Frueauff Foundation for middle-income students who live outside North Carolina. 
Amounts vary according to need, up to $1,500. 

The James W. Gill Scholarship, donated by Ruth R. Gill in memory of her husband 
i James W. Gill, provides a scholarship for a deserving student, with preference given 
; to students from Montgomery and Prince George Counties, Maryland, for a value of 
approximately $600. 

The Eugene Basil Glover Memorial Scholarship is awarded to an incoming or enrolled 
pi student based on ability and need, with a slight preference given to students from 
Halifax County, North Carolina. 



40 

The Wallace Barger Goebel Scholarship, made possible through a donation fro 
Miriam M. Goebel, is based upon ability and financial need, with first preferen 
given to a student with an interest in literature, second preference to a student with a 
interest in history, and third preference to a student enrolled in the pre-medic 
program, for a value of approximately $400. 

The Fuller Hamrick Scholarship, created under the will of the late Everett C. Snyder d 
Wake Forest, North Carolina in memory of Fuller Hamrick, is used to educaj 
students from the Mills Home in I homasville. North Carolina, for a value of approx 
mately $550. 

The Frank P. Hobgood Scholarship, donated bv Kate H., Hobgood of Reidsvilli 
North Carolina in memory of her husband, is available to those who qualify on th 
basis of character, purpose, intelligence, and need, with preference given to thos 
who plan to enter the ministry, do religious work, become teachers, or becom 
lawyers, the preference being in the order named, for residents of the Reidsvil 
North Carolina area recommended by the deacons of the First Baptist Church < 
Reidsville, and for a value of $500. 

The Forrest H. Hollifield Scholarship, donated by Mr. and Mrs. H. H. Hollifield i 
memory of their son Forrest H. Hollifield, is awarded to upperclassmen with e\: 
dence of character and need, with preference given to natives of Rowan and Ruthti 
ford Counties, North Carolina and to members of the Delta Nu Chapter of Sigma CI 
Fraternity. 

The J. Lee Keiger Sr. Scholarship is an academic scholarship awarded annually to 
North Carolina student, with preference given to students living in the Mid-Carolin 
Telephone Company service region, for a value of $750. 

The Senah C. and C.A. Kent Scholarships are awarded to freshmen and upperclassmei 
on the basis of leadership, academic merit, and financial need, without regard to race 
religion, sex, or geographical origin. 

The Kirkpatrick-H oxvell Memorial Scholarship Fund, donated by the Delta Nu Chapte 
of Sigma Chi Fraternity, makes available one or two scholarships, with preferenc 
given to members of the Sigma Chi Fraternity, upon recommendation of th 
Kir kpatrick- Howell Memorial Scholarship Board, for a value of approximately $800 

The Wilma L. McCurdy Memorial Fund Scholarship is awarded on the basis of charac 
ter, academic standing, and need, in the amount of $750 per academic year. Applica 
tion must be made annually. 

The Thane Fdward McDonald and Marie Dayton McDonald Memorial Scholarship Fund 
made possible bv the late Thane Fdward McDonald, professor of music, is available t< 
a deserving and qualified music student for a value of approximately $125. 

The Robert Lee Middleton Scholarship, donated bv Sarah Edwards Middleton o 
Nashville, Tennessee in memory of her husband, is awarded on the basis of charactei 
purpose, intelligence, and need, with preference given to the student planning to 
enter the field of literature, accounting, teaching, or the gospel ministry or other 
full-time religious work. 

The Sorfleet Scholarships, donated by Mr. and Mrs. Eustace Norfleet of Wilmington, 
North Carolina in memory of his parents John A. and Mary Pope Norfleet, arc 
available to deserving and promising students needing financial assistance for a value 
of $200. 



41 

> The North Carolina Scholarships are made available by the North Carolina General 
I'lssembly and are awarded on the basis of financial need to full-time students who are 
fona fide residents of North Carolina. 

i North Carolina Student Incentive Grants are available to undergraduate residents of 

Jorth Carolina with exceptional financial need who require these grants in order to 

" ittend college, for a value of from $200 to $1 ,500 per year. The amount of assistance 

;: student may receive depends upon need, taking into account financial resources 

i nd the cost of attending the college chosen. 

The Benjamin Wingate Parham Scholarship, donated by Kate J. Parham of Oxford, 
North Carolina in memory of her husband, is awarded on the basis of ability and need 
i nd may be renewed for succeeding years. 

i The Thomas F. Pettus Scholarships, administered by the North Carolina Baptist 

foundation under the terms of the will of the late Thomas F. Pettus of Wilson 

i Uounty, North Carolina, make two or more scholarships available each year in 

I nemory of Mr. Pettus and are awarded on the basis of merit and need, with 

reference given to North Carolina Baptist students. 

i \1 The William Louis Poteat Scholarships, awarded annually to the graduates of the 

baptist junior colleges in North Carolina on the basis of need, are renewable for the 

Senior year for a value of up to $500. 

The A. M. Fallen caul Company Scholarship, granted by the A. M. Pullen Company to 
in outstanding upper division accounting major designated by the accounting faculty 
(i)n the basis of merit, financial need, and interest in public accounting, has a value of 
[$600. 

The Kenneth Tyson Raynor Scholarship, donated by friends of the late Kenneth Tyson 
sRaynor, professor of mathematics, is awarded annually by t he mathematics faculty. 
The award is made on the basis of academic ability to an individual majoring in 
mathematics who has achieved junior standing. 

i The Oliver I), and Caroline F. Revell Memorial Scholarship Fund, created under the will 
K)f the late Oliver D. Revell of Buncombe County, North Carolina, is for a person 
ipreparing for the ministry or full-time religious work, for a value of $100. 
1 The Kate B. Reynolds Memorial Scholarships, donated in memory of the late Kate B. 
iiReynolds, are for residents of Forsyth County, North Carolina who without financial 
/.aid would be unable to obtain education beyond high school. At least four scholar- 
ships are awarded, with a value up to $2,400. 

The ROTC Scholarships require applications for four-year scholarships from stu- 
'dents in their junior and senior year of high school to the nearest ROTC regional 
headquarters and from freshmen, sophomores, and juniors enrolled in the ROTC 
program to the professor of military science. Each scholarship covers tuition, fees, 
books, and classroom materials for the regular school year, and a subsistence allow- 
ance of $100 per month for the period that the scholarship is in effect, remaining in 
^effect throughout the contract period subject to satisfactory academic and ROTC 
performance. 

The Robert Forest Smith HI Scholarship Fund, donated by the Rev. Mr. and Mrs. Robert 
Forest Smith Jr. and other citizens of Hickory, North Carolina in memory of Robert 
Forest Smith III, is awarded to an entering freshman who qualifies on the basis of 
need and on distinction in high school government, with preference given to those 



42 



who plan to enter government service, and with strong preference given to studen 
exemplifying positive Christian principles, for a value of $1,000. 

The Sigmund Sternberger Scholarships, donated bv the Sigmund Sternberger Found; 
tion, are for needy North Carolinians, with preference given to undergradiuit 
students from Greensboro and Guilford County, for a value of $2,000. 

The J. W. Straughan Scholarship, donated by Mattie, Mable, and Alice Straughan i 
memory of their brother Dr. J. W. Straughan of Warsaw, North Carolina, wit 
preference given to students from Duplin County, North Carolina who are interested 
in pursuing a medical career, especiallv in the field of family practice, are for thos 
who need financial assistance to continue their education. 

The Saddye Stephenson and Benjamin Louis Sykes Scholarship, donated bv Dr. Charles 1 
Svkes and Dr. Ralph J. Svkes in memory of their mother and father, is awarded on tin 
basis of Christian character, academic proficiency, and financial need, with prefer 
ence given to freshmen from North Carolina, renewable for a value of approximate!] 
$40o! 

The Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants are available to a limited number o 
undergraduate students with exceptional financial need who require these grants u 
attend college and who show academic or creative promise, for a value from $200 U 
$1 ,500 a year but no more than one-half of the total assistance given the student. The 
amount of financial assistance a student may receive depends upon need, taking int< 
account financial resources and the cost of attending the college chosen. 

The Tyner-Pitman Scholarship Fund, donated bv Cora Tyner Pitman, makes available 
at least one scholarship for needy North Carolina students. 

The Jesse A. Williams Scholarships, created under the will of the late Jesse A. Williams 
of Union County, North Carolina, with preference given to deserving students of 
Union County, have a value up to $1,200. 

The Charles Littell Wilson Scholarship, created under the will of Jennie Mayes Wilson 
in memory of her husband Charles Littell Wilson, is for a freshman, with a value from 
$200 to $(")()(). 

The William Luther Wyatt III Scholarship Trust, donated bv Mr. and Mrs. William L. 
Wyatt Jr. of Raleigh, North Carolina in memory of their son William Luther Wyatt 
III, with preference given to a male student entering the junior vear who has shown 
an interest and an ability in the field of biology, is based on need and ability, for ;i 
value of approximately $500. 



Exchange Scholarships 

The German Exchange Scholarship, established in 1959 with the free University of 
Berlin, is available to a student with at least two years of college German or the 
equivalent who has junior standing by the end of the semester in which application is 
made, but who need not be a German major. It provides 750 German marks per 
month for ten months, remission of fees, 200 marks per semester for books, and 250 
marks per month for rent. (Interested students should communicate with the chair- 
man of the Department of German.) 

The Spanish Exchange Scholarship, established in 1904 with the University of the 
Andes in Bogota, Colombia, is available to two students for one semester's studv each 






43 

i >r one student for two semesters with at least two years of college Spanish or the 
equivalent. It provides remission of fees, the cost of books, and the cost of board and 
iccommodations. (Interested students should communicate with the chairman of the 
Department of Romance Languages.) 

The French Exchange Scholarship, established in 197 1 with the University of Orleans, 
France, is available to a graduating senior, who receives a graduate teaching assistant- 
ihip at the University of Orleans for two semesters. (Interested students should 
communicate with the chairman of the Department of Romance Languages.) 

i Loans 

The James F. and Man' Z. Bryan Foundation Student Loan Plan is for residents of North 
.Carolina enrolled full-time for a value up to $7,500 for undergraduate study. The 
amount of each loan is determined by the College Foundation, with an interest rate of 
one percent during the in-school and grace periods and seven percent during the 
repayment period. 

The Bushnell Baptist Church Loan Fund, established in 1945 with funds supplied by 
the Bushnell Baptist Church of Fontana Dam. North Carolina, is for needy students. 

The Council Fund, established in 1935 by C. T. Council of Durham, North Carolina, 
is for the aid of senior students. 

The James W. Denmark Loan Fund, originated in 1875 by James William Denmark of 
Dudley, North Carolina, is available to qualified students, with preference given to 
. students from North Carolina, for an amount not exceeding $1,500 each year and 
$6,000 during the entire period of enrollment. 

The Olivia Dunn Student Loan Fund, established under the will of Birdie Dunn of 
Wake County, North Carolina in memory of her mother, is for worthy students. 

The Duplin County Loan Fund, donated in 1942 by anonymous friends of the 
College, is limited to students from Duplin County, North Carolina. 

The Elliott B. Earnshaw Loan Fund, established by the Board of Trustees, is a 
memorial to the former Bursar. 

The Friendly Student Loan Fund, established in 1948 bv Nell E. Stinson of Raleigh, 
North Carolina in memory of her sister Mary Belle Stinson Michael, is for the benefit 
of worthy students who need Financial aid. 

The Ceorge Foster Hankins Loan Fund, established under the will of the late Colonel 
George Foster Hankins of Lexington, North Carolina, gives preference to applicants 
i from Davidson County, North Carolina. 

The Guaranteed Student Loan Program makes available loans up to $2,500 for under- 
graduate students. Aggregate undergraduate sums may not exceed $7,500, btit may 
I be extended to $ 1 5,000 for those who also borrow for graduate or professional study. 
i The maximum loan per year for graduate students is $5,000. Loans are insured by 
the federal government or guaranteed by a state or private non-profit guarantee 
agency. The federal government pays the seven percent interest during in-school 
and grace periods. Application and information may be obtained from state guaran- 
tee agencies or from the appropriate regional office of the United States Office of 
Education. 

The Harris Memorial Loan Fund, established by the late J. P. Harris of Bethel, North 
Carolina in memory of his first wife Lucy Shearon Harris and his second wife Lucy 



44 



Jones Harris, is for students who have demonstrated ability to apply education 
advantages to the rendition of enriched and greater Christian service in life and w 
require financial assistance in order to prevent disruption in their education. 

The Edna Tyner Langston Fund, established in 1942 by Dr. Henry J. Langston 
Danville, Virginia in memory of his wife, is available to a student agreed upon by tfl 
donor and the College. 

The National Direct Student Loan Program makes available loans up to $2,500 per ye 1 ' 
for students in need of financial assistance with an interest rate of three perceij 
These are examples of typical repayment schedules: 



egate Loan 


Quarterly 


Amount of 


Total Interest 


Total 




Payments 


Payment 


Paid 


Paymen 


$2,500 


28 


$ 90.00 


$ 269.78 


$2,769.7 


5,000 


40 


125.00 


768.65 


5,768.6 


7,500 


40 


187.50 


1,153.07 


8,653.0 



Aggregate undergraduate sums may not exceed $2,500 for the first two years ( 
$5,000 for four years, but may be extended to $10,000 for those who also borrow h 
graduate or professional study, with an interest rate of three percent. 

The North Carolina Insured Student Loan Program makes available loans up to $2,50 
per year for legal residents enrolled full-time. Aggregate undergraduate sums ma 
not exceed $7,500 but may be extended to $15,000 for those who also borrow fo 
graduate or professional study. The maximum loan each year may not exceed $2,50 
for undergraduates or $5,000 for graduates or professional students. Loans ar 
insured by the North Carolina State Education Assistance Authority and are pre 
cessed by the College Foundation. Under certain conditions the United States Offic 
of Education pays the seven percent interest during the in-school and grace periods 

The Watts Norton Loan Fund, established in 1949 by L. Watts Norton of Durham 
North Carolina, is for worthy students enrolled in the Department of Religion wh 
need financial assistance. 

The Powers Fund, established in 1944 by Dr. Prank P. Powers of Raleigh, Nort 
Carolina in memory of his parents Frank P. and Effie Reade Powers, is for the benefi 
of needy students, with preference given to orphans. 

The Grover and Addy Raby Loan Fund, established in 1945 by Dr. J. G. Rabv o 
Tarboro, North Carolina in memory of his parents, gives preference to applicant 
from the First Baptist Church of Tarboro. 

The James F. Slate Loan Fund, established in 1908 by J. F. Slate of Stokes County, 
North Carolina, is available for ministerial students who have been licensed to 
preach. 



Concessions 

North Carolina Legislative Tuition Grants. The North Carolina General Assembh 
provides yearly grants to all legal residents of North Carolina. To be eligible a student 
must be enrolled for at least fourteen credits each semester (by the tenth day of 
classes) and complete a Residencv Form 100. The student must not have received a 



45 

ichelor's degree previously. To receive the grant, a student must also complete an 

/CLTG application and return it to the Financial Aid Office. 

Ministerial students receive a $600 concession per year if they (1) have a written 

•commendation or license to preach from their own church body and (2) agree to 

■pay the total amount, plus four percent interest, in the event that they do not serve 

ve years in the pastoral ministry within twelve years of attendance in the College. 

i Children and spouses of pastors of North Carolina Baptist churches receive a $600 

[ mcession per year if they are the children or spouses of ( 1 ) ministers, (2) missionar- 

s of the Southern Baptist Foreign Mission Board, (3) officials of the Baptist State 

onvention of North Carolina, or (4) professors in North Carolina Baptist colleges or 

niversities. Pastors themselves are also eligible. 

, Children of other ministers who are not eligible for the above concession receive a $ 1 50 
jncession per year if their parent makes a living chiefly by the ministry and they have 
demonstrated need. 

i Rehabilitation students receive a concession up to $300 per year if they (1) have a 
etter of approval from the North Carolina Division of Vocational Rehabilitation and 
'I) file for the concession. 



r Other Financial Aid 

The College Work/Study Program On Campus makes available on-campus employment 

o students who show evidence of financial need. Students work during the academic 

ear for campus minimum wage or above, at an average of ten to fifteen hours per 

.veek, in the Z. Smith Reynolds Library, Reynolda Hall, College Union, Reynolda 

hardens, and other places on campus. 

The College Work/Study Program Off Campus (PACE) is for students who show evi- 
dence of financial need. They work in any non-profit public or private institution for 
periods up to fifteen weeks during the summer, and forty hours per week, at an 
lourly wage. Eighty percent of earnings should be retained for college expenses. 
Summer employment is also available for students who show evidence of need and 
A'ho are unable to secure adequate employment on their own. (Interested students 
ihould apply before March 15.) 

Church Choir Work Grants, given by the College and Wake Forest Baptist Church to 
-ncourage outstanding music students, are awarded on the basis of talent, reliability, 
and interest in the Church on the recommendation of the music committee of the 
Church and the Department of Music, for the value of $300. (Interested students 
should communicate with the chairman of the Department of Music.) 

The Ministerial Aid Fund, established in 1897 by the estate of J. A. Melke, is available 
to pre-ministerial students on a loan or grant program on the basis of merit and need, 
and particularly in the case of grants, academic achievement. 

Student/Student Spouse Employment is possible for part-time, on-campus and off- 
campus work, for a recommended maximum of twenty hours per week for full-time 
students. Summer employment may also be available. (Interested students should 
communicate with the Office of Placement and Career Development.) 



46 



Veteran Benefits are administered by the Office oi the Veterans Administratioi 
the Federal Building at 251 North Main Street in Winston-Salem. Records of pr 
ress are kept by this institution on veteran and non-veteran students alike. Progi 
records are furnished the students, veterans and non-veterans alike, at the end 
each scheduled school term. 




John Williard, vice president and treasurer 



47 



Special Programs 



For students of special ability or interest and for students who can take advantage 
off-campus study opportunities, the College offers a variety of programs ranging 
am four-week, courses to four-year curricula. These are in addition to combined 
urses of study in departments in the College and the pre-professional curricula 
scribed in this bulletin. 

Honors Study 

For highly qualified students, a series of interdisciplinary honors courses is de- 
ribed under Courses of Instruction. Under the Coordinator of the Honors Program, 
udents participate in three or more honors seminars during the freshman, sopho- 
ore, and junior years. Those who complete four seminars with a superior record 
id who are not candidates for departmental honors may complete a final directed 
udy course. With a superior record in that course and a grade point average of 3.0 in 
1 work, a student may be graduated with 'Honors in the Arts and Sciences." 
For students especially talented in individual areas of study, most departments in 
le College offer special studies leading to graduation with honors in a particular 
iscipline. The minimum requirement is a grade point average of 3.0 in all work and 

; 3 (or higher in some areas) in the major. Other course, seminar, and research 

requirements vary according to the department concerned. 

Open Curriculum 

For students with high motivation and strong academic preparation, the Open 
urriculum provides the opportunity to follow a course of study planned within the 
amework of a liberal arts education but not necessarily fulfilling all basic and 
ivisional requirements for the degree. Under the Committee on Open Curriculum a 
mited number of students are selected before or during the freshman year by 
revious record of achievement, high aspirations, ability in one or more areas of 
udy, strength of self-expression, and other special talents. The course of study for 
le degree is designed by the student and his or her adviser. 

Residential Language Centers 

For students prepared to speak French, German, or Spanish on a regular basis with 
ther students studying the same language, the Graylyn Estate near campus is the site 
f three residential centers. Under faculty coordinators from the Department of 
Romance Languages and the Department of German, students live for one or more 
emesters at Bernard Cottage (for French), Amos Cottage (for Spanish), or the 
llanor House (for German), attending regular classes on campus but speaking 
rench, Spanish, or German in the residential center. 

Study at Salem College 

For full-time students, Wake Forest and Salem College share a program of ex- 
hange credits for courses taken at one institution because they are not offered at the 



48 

other. An application must be approved by the academic adviser and the Dean of i i 
College. Except in courses of private instruction, there is no additional cost to tB 
student. Grades and grade points earned at Salem College are evaluated as if thj 
were earned at Wake Forest. 

Summer Study 

For full-time students, courses taken in the summer at another college or universi 
require the advance approval of the chairman of the department concerned and tl 
Registrar. Grades earned elsewhere are not used in computing the grade average 
those earned elsewhere on the semester hour plan are computed as transfer credit 
3.375 credits for three approved semester hours taken elsewhere. 

In addition to regular courses, a number of special summer programs for credit ai 
described in the bulletin of the summer session. 

January Study 

For students who wish to follow individual or non-traditional courses of study o 
campus or field study in places like Honduras, Russia, and Switzerland, the Januar 
term offers a number of four-credit courses, many on a Pass/Fail basis. January terr 
courses are described under Courses of Instruction. 

Opportunities for Study Abroad 

London 

A program of study is offered each semester at Worrell House, the University' 
residential center near Regent's Park in London. Courses typically encompass aspect 
of the art, theatre, literature, and history of London and Great Britain. (See, fo 
example, Art 2320; English Art, Hogarth to the Present, and History 2260: History < 
London, in the course listings of those departments.) Each term a different member o 
the facultv serves as the director of the program, which accommodates sixteer 
students. Further information may be obtained in the Office of the Provost. 

Venice 

For students wishing to spend a semester in Italy, a program of study is available ai 
Casa Artom, the University's residential center on the Grand Canal in Venice. Undet 
various members of the faculty, approximately twenty students focus on the heritage 
and culture of Venice and Italy. (Courses offered usually include Art 2693: Venetian 
Renaissance Art, Italian 2213: Spoken Italian, and other courses offered by the facul^ 
member serving as director.) Students selected for the Venice program are normalh 
required to have completed elementary training in Italian. Limited scholarship aid i> 
available to one or two students each semester to assist with expenses. Further 
information may be obtained in the Office of the Provost. 

France 

For students wishing to study in France, arrangements are made for a semester'^ 
instruction at the University of Dijon. Under a faculty residential adviser from the 



49 



lepartment of Romance Languages, courses are taken at the University of Dijon by 
udent groups of varying levels of preparation. (A major in French is not required, 
I ut French 221 or its equivalent is recommended.) 

Spain 

For students wishing to study in Spain, arrangements are made for a semester's 
istruction at the University of Salamanca. Under a faculty residential adviser from 
le Department of Romance Languages, courses are taken at the University of 
alamanca by student groups of varying levels of preparation. (A major in Spanish is 
ot required, but Spanish 221 or its equivalent is recommended.) 

India 

For students who can spend a semester in India, arrangements are made for 
lstruction in an Indian college or university and travel in the country for a period of 
bout three months. (Written approval from the Dean of the College is necessary for 
alfilling basic, divisional, or major requirements.) 

f Independent Study 

i For students who wish to spend one or more semesters in an approved college or 
niversity abroad, arrangements must be made with the chairman of the department 
f the major and the Dean of the College. An approved application for study abroad 
lust also be Filed with the Registrar. Lip to thirty-six credits for a full-year program 
lay be granted by the College upon satisfactory evaluation of the work taken, but this 
redit is not guaranteed. Students not on a College program must apply for readmis- 

'ion to the University. Credit is computed as transfer credit at 3.375 credits for three 

jpproved semester hours taken abroad. 

' In addition, the Independent Study Program of the Experiment in International 
.iving is recognized by the College. To participate in this program a student must be 

> egularly enrolled and plan to return to the College after study abroad, and arrange- 

p lents must be made with the chairman of the department of the major and the Dean 
f the College. Up to fourteen credits for a one-semester program may be granted 
pon evidence of satisfactory completion of work taken, but this is subject to evalua- 
on by the Dean of the College. 




Graylyn Estate, site of the residential language centers 



50 



Requirements for Degrees 



Degrees Offered 

The College offers undergraduate programs leading to the Bachelor of Arts an 
Bachelor of Science degrees. The Bachelor of Arts degree is conferred with a maj< 
in anthropology, art, biology, chemistry, classical studies, economics, Englis' 
French, French-Spanish, German, Greek, history, Latin, music, philosophy, physic 
politics, psychology, religion, sociology, Spanish, or speech communication an ; 
theatre arts. The Bachelor of Science degree is conferred with a major in accountai 
cy, business, chemistry, mathematical economics, mathematics, mathematics-biology 
mathematics-business, physical education, or physics. The Bachelor of Arts degree i 
available with a major in intermediate education or education with a state teacher 
certificate in social studies, and the Bachelor of Science degree is available with 
major in education with a state teacher's certificate in science. The Bachelor d 
Science Degree may be conferred in combined curricula in dentistry, engineering 
forestry and environmental studies, medical sciences, medical technology, and th 
physician assistant program. 

A student who receives the Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree fron 
the College may not thereafter receive the other of the two degrees. 



General Requirements 

Students in the College have considerable flexibility in planning their course c 
study. Except for two semesters of required physical education, only three specili 
courses are required, one in English composition and two in a foreign language. T 
complete preparation for more specialized work in a major field or fields, student 
select three courses in each of four divisions of the undergraduate curriculum: (1 
literature and the arts; (2) the natural sciences and mathematics; (3) history, religion 
and philosophy; and (4) the social and behavioral sciences. Normally the basic an< 
divisional requirements are completed in the freshman and sophomore years am 
requirements in the field or fields of the major are completed in the junior and senio 
years. 

All students must complete (1) the basic and divisional requirements (unles 
accepted for the Open Curriculum), (2) a course of study approved by the depart 
ment or departments of the major, and (3) elective courses for a total of 144 credits 
No more than sixteen credits toward graduation may be earned in Military Sciend 
111, 112, 151, 152, 211, 212, 251. 252; Music 111-123 (ensemble courses); anc 
physical education 100-level courses other than the physical education requirement 

All students must earn a C average on all courses attempted. A student wh< 
transfers from another college or university must earn a C average on all course 
attempted in the College and a C average on all work attempted at all colleges anc 
universities. Of the 144 credits required for graduation, at least seventy-two must b< 
completed in the College, including the work of the senior year (except forcombinec 
degree curricula). 






51 

A student has the privilege of graduating under the requirements of the bulletin in 
■ ,hich he or she enters, provided that course work is completed within six years of 
ntrance. After six years, the student must Fulfill the requirements for the class in 
hich he or she graduates. 

i Basic Requirements 

1 All students must complete three required basic courses (unless waived through 
rocedures established by the departments concerned): 

1 English 110 (composition) or 112 (composition and literature) 

" Foreign language 153 (intermediate level) 

] Foreign language (literature) 

[ French 213, 214, 216, 217, or the equivalent 

Spanish 215, 216, or the equivalent 

Italian 215, 216, or the equivalent 

German 211 or 212 

Russian (any literature course) 

Greek 211 or 212 

Latin 211, 212, or 216 

Hebrew 211 
1 Hindi 211 

No credit is given for any language course below the one recommended by the 
lepartment on the basis of the placement test unless the student is given permission 
>y the Language Placement Appeals Board. 

Divisional Requirements 

All students must complete three courses in each of the four divisions of the 
indergraduate curriculum (unless exempted by completion of Advanced Placement 
equirements): 

division I. Literature and the Arts (three courses; no more than one course from any 

i one of the four groups) 

|i: 1. English literature (English 160 or 165) 

j 2. American literature (English 170 or 175) 

3. Foreign literature (other than the one used for the basic require- 
h ment) 

- Classical languages 

Greek 211, 212, 231, 241, or 242 
Latin 21 1, 212, 216, 221, 225, or 226 
Classics 253, 254, 263, 264, 265, or 272 

- German 211 or 212 

- Romance languages (French, Spanish, or Russian literature) 
i| - Humanities 213, 214, 215, 216, or 217 

4. Fine Arts 

I - Art 103 

- Music 101 or 102 

- Theatre Arts 121 






52 



Division II. The Natural Sciences and Mathematics (three courses, selected from two 
the four groups) 

1. Biology 111, 150, or 151 

2. Chemistry 111, 112 (unless advanced preparation indicates a high, 
course) 

3. Physics 101, 111, 112, 121, 122 

4. Mathematics 111, 112, 115, 1 10, 157 (anyone; if two, any pairoth 
than 111, 110 and 115, 157) 

Division III. History, Religion, and Philosophy (three courses; no more than one cour:< 
from each group) 

1. History 101 or 102 

2. Religion (any course other than 218, 225, 237, 239, 240, 265, 26| 
270, 273, 282, 286, 287, 292, and 346) 

3. Philosophy 111, 171, or 172 
Division IV. The Social and Behavioral Sciences (three courses; no more than one froi 

any one department) 

1. Anthropology 151 or 152 

2. Economics 111 or 152 (Note that 151 is prerequisite for 152.) 

3. Politics 113, 114, or 115 

4. Psychology 151 

5. Sociology 151 

Requirement in Physical Education 

All students must complete Physical Education 1 1 1 and one additional cours 
selected from the 100-series of physical education courses. The requirement must b 
met before enrollment in additional physical education elective courses. 

Proficiency in the Use of English 

Proficiency in the use of the English language is recognized by the faculty as 
requirement in all departments. A composition condition, indicated by cc under th 
grade for any course, may be assigned in any department to a student whose writing 
unsatisfactory, regardless of previous credits in composition. The writing of transit 
students is checked during the orientation period each term, and students whos 
writing is deficient are given a composition condition. For removal of a compositio 
condition the student is required to take English 1 1 during the first semester f< 
which he or she registers following the assignment of the cc. Removal of the deficiei 
cy is prerequisite to graduation. 

Completion of Lower Division Requirements 

Basic, divisional, and physical education requirements should be completed whei 
possible by the end of the sophomore year. For students who postpone requirec 
courses until the junior year to complete early major courses, a minimum of thre< 
required courses must be taken each semester until the requirements have beer 
completed. Except for students accepted for the Open Curriculum, no course re 



53 

lirements may be waived or replaced by substitutes except through regular proce- 
jres established by the faculty or through a specific vote of the faculty in regular 
ssion. 



Admission to the Upper Division 

The work in the lower division is intended to give the student an introduction to the 
irious fields of knowledge and to lay the foundation for concentration in a major 
;bject and related fields during the junior and senior years. 

Before applying for admission to the upper division and beginning work on the 
ajor subject, a student should have seventy-two credits and 144 grade points in the 
vver division. In no case is a student admitted to the upper division with fewer than 
<ty credits and 120 grade points. 



Fields of Study in the Upper Division 

Thirty days before the end of the sophomore year each student is required to 
idicate to the Registrar and to the department or departments concerned the 
■lection of a major subject for concentration during the junior and senior years, 
efore this selection is formally approved by the Registrar, the student must present 
written statement from the authorized representative of the department or depart- 
lents indicating that the student has been accepted as a candidate for the major in 
lat department. An adviser is available to assist the student in planning a course of 
udy for the junior and senior years. A department which rejects a student as a major 
mst file with the Dean of the College a written statement indicating the reason(s) for 
le rejection. 

The College makes a reasonable effort to provide ample space in the various major 

elds to accommodate the interests of students. It must be understood, however, that 

: ie College cannot undertake to guarantee the availability of space in a given major 

eld or a given course, since the preferences of students change and there are limits 

,i both faculty and facilities. 

j! After the beginning of the junior year a student may not change from one major to 
aother without the approval of the departments concerned. The student's course of 
udy for the junior and senior years includes the minimum requirements for the 
j°partmental major, with other courses selected by the student and approved by the 
iviser. 

At least half of the major must be completed in the College. Students preparing for 
le ministry are advised to elect three courses in religion beyond the course included 
i the divisional requirements. 

The following fields of study are recognized for the major: accountancy, anthro- 
'ology, art, biology, business, chemistry, classical studies, economics, education, 
nglish, French, French-Spanish, German, Creek, history, Latin, mathematical eco- 
omics, mathematics, mathematics-biology, mathematics-business, music, philoso- 
phy, physical education, physics, politics, psychology, religion, sociology, Spanish, 
id speech communication and theatre arts. 



54 

Maximum Number of Courses in a Department 

A maximum of forty-eight credits in a single field of study is allowed within the 
credits required for graduation. This excludes required related courses from ot' 
departments. 

For dual major departments, fifty-six credits toward graduation are allowed in 
department authorized to offer two fields of study. Elementary foreign languag 
the major field of study and Accountancy 111, 112 (for those majoring in account 
cy) are excluded. 

These limits may be exceeded in unusual circumstances only by action of the I) 
of the College. 

Double Majors and Joint Majors 

A student may major in two departments with the written permission of 
chairman of each of the departments and on condition that the student meet 5 
requirements for the major in both departments, for administrative purposes 
student must designate one of the two fields as the primary major, which appears f 
on the student's record. 

A joint major consisting of fifty-six credits in two fields of study is availabk 
classical studies, in mathematical economics, in mathematics-biology, in mathemat 
business, and in French-Spanish. 

Senior Testing 

All seniors are required to participate in a testing program designed to pro\ 
objective evidence of educational development and employing measures of acadei 
achievement such as selected portions of the Graduate Record Examination and 
other tests deemed appropriate by the Committee on Academic Affairs. T he tests 
administered during the spring semester, and relevant results are made availabk 1 
the student for his or her information. The primary purpose of the program h 
provide the College with information for assessing the total educational process. T 
program does not supplant the regular administration of the Graduate Recc 
Examination for those students applying for admission to graduate school. 

Combined Degrees in the School of Law 

A combined course makes it possible for a student to receive the two degree- 
Bachelor of Arts and Juris Doctor in six academic years or their equivalent insteac 
the usual seven years. The first three years of the combined course are in the Coll" 
and the last three are in the School of Law. 

A student pursuing this plan must (1) complete the basic and divisional coui 
requirements and become qualified for admission to the upper division; (2) initi 
an application for admission to the School of Law and secure through the law schp 
adviser, who is a member of the law faculty, permission to pursue the combird 
course plan; (Admission to the School of Law is based on the applicant's enlje 
undergraduate record, Law School Admission Test scores, and other criteria, M 






55 

r mission to pursue the combined degree program does not constitute admission to 
t, School of Law.); (3) perform the junior year of study in the College under the 
s ervision of a departmental academic adviser and the law school adviser; and (4) 
c iplete at least 1 10 credits in the College with a minimum average of C and the first 
f year of law in the School of Law with an average sufficient to remain in the School 
fc Law. 

lie last year of required college academic work must be taken in the College. A 
s dent who transfers from another college or university at the end of the first or 
spnd year must maintain a minimum average grade of C on all academic work 
i lertaken in the College. 

i student who completes the program successfully is eligible to receive the Bache- 
1 of Arts degree at the end of the first full year in the School of Law; the Juris Doctor 
c ;ree is awarded the student who, having received the Bachelor of Arts degree, also 
ft fills requirements for the Juris Doctor degree. The quantitative and qualitative 
z demic requirements set forth herein are minimum requirements for the success- 
f; completion of the combined degree program; satisfying the requirements of the 
t;ee-year program in the College does not necessarily entitle an applicant to admis- 
s i to the School of Law. 
\\ 

Combined Degrees in Medical Sciences 

^ limited number of students may receive a Bachelor of Science degree with a 

jor in medical sciences. 

Jnder this plan the student fulfills the requirements for the degree by completing 

ee years of work in the College with a minimum average grade of C and by 
s isfactorily completing the first full year of medicine (at least thirty semester hours) 
; outlined by the faculty of the Bowman Cray School of Medicine, with a record 
ritling promotion to the second year class. (Under current scheduling, successful 
(i ididates receive the baccalaureate degree in August rather than May.) At least one 
Ijir (thirty-six credits) of the required academic work must be completed in the 
'liege. 

Candidates for the Bachelor of Science degree with a major in medical sciences 
] :st complete before entering the School of Medicine for the fourth year of work the 
1 ic course requirements; the divisional course requirements in Divisions I, III, and 
.' .; the physical education requirement; Biology 111, 150, 151 (any two courses); 
1 )logy 312, 320, 321, 326, 351, 360, 370 (any two courses); Chemistry 1 1 1 and 112; 
'jemistry 221 and 222; Physics 1 1 1 and 112; mathematics (one course); andelectives 
ij a total of 108 credits. 

J The completion of the prescribed academic subjects does not necessarily entitle an 
• Dlicant to admission to the School of Medicine. (All other factors being equal, 
■ olicants who have done all their work in the College are given preference.) 

Combined Degrees in Medical Technology 

Students may qualify for the Bachelor of Science degree in medical technology by 

1 npletion of the academic requirements outlined below and by satisfactory comple- 

n of the full program in medical technology offered by the Division of Allied 



56 

Health Programs of the Bowman Gray School of Medicine with at least a gradeof (i I 
all courses taken in the program in medical technology. At least one year (thirty-it | 
credits) of the required academic work must be completed in the College. (Urur 
current scheduling, successful candidates receive the baccalaureate degree in Aug t I 
rather than May.) 

Students seeking admission to the program must file application in the fall of th'r I 
junior year with the division of Allied Health Programs of the School of Medici . i 
Students are selected based upon recommendations of teachers, college acadeic 
record, Allied Health Professions Admissions Test score, impressions made in p.. i 
sonal interviews, and possible work experience (not essential, but important). Si 1 
dents must complete the basic course requirements; the divisional course requil 
ments in Divisions I, III, and IV; the physical education requirement; Biology 1 , 
150, 151 (three courses or equivalents); Biology 326; Chemistry 111, 112, 221, al 1 
222; mathematics (one course); and electives for a total of 108 credits. Desiral: I 
electives outside the area of chemistry and biology include physics, data processir, i 
and personnel and management courses. (Interested students should consulli 
biology department faculty member during the freshman year for further inform 
tion.) 

Degrees in the Physician Assistant Program 

Students may qualify for the Bachelor of Science degree in the physician assist it 
program by completion of three years (108 credits) in the College with a minimal 
average grade of C, and by satisfactory completion of the full twenty-four moijl j 
course in the physician assistant program offered by the Division of Allied Heah 
Programs of the Bowman Gray School of Medicine. At least one year (thirty -x 
credits) of the required academic work must be completed in the College. Candidas 
for the degree must complete the basic course requirements, the divisional cou 
requirements, and the physical education requirement; at least four courses 
biology (including one course in microbiology); and at least four courses in the soal 
sciences (sociology, psychology, and economics are recommended). A course! 
statistics and three or four courses in chemistry are also recommended. Applicants 
the program must possess a minimum of six months clinical experience in patid 
care services. (Interested students should consult a biology department faculty me- 
ber during the freshman year for further information.) 

Degrees in Microbiology 

Students may qualify for the Bachelor of Science degree in microbiology y 
completion of three years (112 credits) in the College with a minimum average gra; 
of C, and by satisfactory completion of a thirty-two-hour major in microbiology in t: 
Bowman Gray School of Medicine. At least one year (thirty-six credits) of tl 
required academic work must be completed in the College. Candidates for the degr* 
must complete the basic course requirements, the divisional course requiremen, 
and the physical education requirement; Microbiology 302, 304 (or Biology 36', 
404, and Biology 370; additional courses to complete the major will be selected fr< I 
Microbiology 40 1 , 403, 406, 407, 408, 415,416,417,418, Biology 32 1 , 374, and 3a 



s 

: 



57 

4. Required related courses are two courses in physics and at least two courses in 
ganic chemistry. Additional chemistry and mathematics courses may be suggested 
the major adviser for students progressing toward advanced work in micro- 
ology. The student should contact the microbiology adviser during the sophomore 
ar to establish a program of study. Work on the major must commence no later 
an the fall semester of the junior year. 



Degrees in Dentistry 

A student may fulfill the requirements for a Bachelor of Science degree with a 
,ajor in dentistry by completing three years of work in the College with a minimum 

erage grade of C, and by satisfactorily completing the first two years of work in one 
certain approved dental schools designated by the University, with a record 

titling advancement to the third year class. 
- For this degree the requirements in the College are the same as those for the degree 

th a major in medical sciences. 



n 



Degrees in Engineering 



The college cooperates with North Carolina State University and other engineer- 

g schools in offering a broad course of study in the arts and sciences combined with 
'ecialized training in engineering. A program for outstanding students covers five 
r ars of study, including three initial years in the College and two full years of 
'chnical training in one of the fields of engineering. (Depending upon the field 
3 iosen, it may be advisable for a student to attend the summer session in the 
'lgineering school after transfer.) Upon successful completion of the five years of 

udy, the student receives the degree of Bachelor of Science from the University and 

e degree of Bachelor of Science in one of the specialized engineering fields from 
5 e engineering school. 

The curriculum for the first three years must include the basic and divisional 
1 quirements for the Bachelor of Science degree. Suggested courses for the fresh- 
en year are English 1 10 and 160 (or a foreign literature); foreign language courses 
111, 215, or 216; Mathematics 111, 112; Physics 121, 122; and Physical Education 
| ,11, 112. Suggested courses for the sophomore year are English 170 (or a foreign 

erature); Philosophy 111; Mathematics 1 13 or 251; Physics 141, 161, and 162; and 

hemistry 111, 112. Suggested courses for the junior year are a history course, a 

ligion course, Mathematics 311, and Economics 151, 152. 

This rigorous curriculum demands special aptitude in science and mathematics. 

ectives are chosen in consultation with the chairman of the Department of Physics. 



Degrees in Forestry and Environmental Studies 



The College cooperates with the Duke University School of Forestry and Environ- 
lental Studies to offer students interested in these areas the possibility of earning 
oth bachelor's and master's degrees within five years. For details about the program 
udents should consult a faculty member in the Department of Biology. 



58 

Courses of Instruction 



Plans of study, course descriptions, and the identification oj instructors apply to the acadijt 
year 1979—80, unless otherunse noted, and reflect official faculty action through March 7, 
1980. 

The University resen>es the right to change programs of study, academic requiretms, 
assigmnent of lecturers, or the announced calendar without prior notice. 

Odd-numbered courses are normally taught in the fall, even-numbered in ie 
spring. Exceptions are noted after course descriptions. Number of credits is shown? 
numerals immediately after the course title — for example, (3) or (3,3)- The symlli 
P — and C — followed by course numbers or titles are used to show prerequisites ;'d 
corequisites in the department. 

Courses 101 — 199 are primarily for freshmen and sophomores; courses 200— !■ 
are primarily for juniors and seniors; courses 30 1—399 are for advanced undergral 
ates and graduate students. (Other graduate courses are described in the bulletin 
the Graduate School; other summer courses are described in the bulletin of e 
summer session.) 

Anthropology 

Stanton K. Tefft, Chairman 

Professors E. Pendleton Banks, Stanton K. Tefft 

Associate Professors David K. Evans, J. Ned Woodall 

Assistant Professor David S. Weaver 

Coordinator of Education, Museum of Man, Elizabeth Lee James 

Adjunct Assistant Professor Jay R. Kaplan 

A major in anthropology requires a minimum of thirty-six credits and must inchle 
Anthropology 151, 152, 340, 380, 388, and either 356 or 359. 

Students are encouraged but not required to enroll in a course offering intense i 
field research training. However, only four credits from Anthropology 381. 382 id 
four credits from Anthropology 383, 384 may be used to meet major requiremes. 
Additional courses are counted within the limits specified for a single field of stul 

A minimum grade point average of 2.0 in anthropology courses is required ai ie 
time the major is declared. A minimum grade point average of 2.0 in all anthropoid 
courses is required for graduation. 

To be graduated with the designation "Honors in Anthropology," highly qualild 
majors are invited to apply to the department for admission to the honors progrft 
They must complete a senior research project, document their research, and satisl* 
torily defend their work in an oral examination. For additional information memlrs 
of the departmental faculty should be consulted. 

151. General Anthropology I: Archeology and Human Evolution. (3 or 4) Orin 

and evolution of man with a focus on human biological and soc ioc ultural chai;e 
during the Plio-Pleistocene. (Credit will not be granted for both Anthropology 4 
and Anthropology 162.) 



JM{. General Anthropology II: Cultural Anthropology. (3 or 4) A cross-cultural 
c ilysis of human institutions with a survey of major theories explaining cultural 
V ietv and human nature. (Credit will not be granted for both Anthropology 152 
i \ Anthropology 341.) 

5 7. Mountain Folklore in North Carolina. (4) The role folklore plays in all human 
■ tures in general and in the culture of the mountain people of Western North 

( rolina in particular. Field trips to mountain counties conducted. Usually offered in 

* i r i 

J \uary. 

! ). Archeological Laboratory Practicum. (2) Instruction in artifact cleaning, pre- 
; ving, cataloging, and analysis; preparation of museum exhibits; familiarization 
' h darkroom procedures; drafting and report preparation. P — Permission of 

1 1 tructor. 
hi. Museum Practicum. (2) Designed to give the student practical experience while 

I ferking at the Museum of Man in six basic areas of museum operation: administra- 
i(n, research, curatorial duties, conservation, exhibition design, and education. 
-Anthropology 151 or Anthropology 152 or permission of instructor. 

2. Physical Anthropology Practicum. (2) Practical experience in current problems 
physical anthropology. P — Anthropology 151. 

1. Archeology of the Carolina Piedmont. (4) Readings and field research directed 
vard collecting and interpreting data on the prehistoric and early historic cultures 
Piedmont North Carolina. Usually offered i}i January. P — Permission of instructor. 

5. Conflict and Change on Roatan Island (Honduras). (4) Readings and field 
■search focusing upon the barriers and processes of sociocultural and technological 
ange in a heterogeneous island community. Usually offered in January. P — 
lthropologv 151 or Anthropology 152 and permission of instructor. 

7. Archeology of Meso-America. (4) A travel course to major archeological ruins 
Central and Southern Mexico, the National Museum in Mexico City, and possibly 
irtain Guatemalan sites. Usually offered in January. 

'0. Museum Design and Operation. (3 or 4) The principles of museum design and 
ieration through lectures, readings, workshops with visiting experts in the field, 
d field trips to neighboring museums (possibly to Washington, D.C.). Students 
ve an opportunity to put some of the principles in practice by planning and 
signing exhibits in the Museum of Man. Usually offered in January. P — Permission of 
structor. 

h 

0. Images of Man: Perspectives on Anthropological Thought. (3 or 4) A study and 

.aluation of the major anthropological theories of man and society, including 

i ltural evolutionism, historical particularism, functionalism, structuralism, cultural 

ology, and cultural materialism. The relevance and significance of these theories to 

odern anthropology are discussed. P — Anthropology 151 and Anthropology 152, 

' id sophomore or junior standing, or permission of instructor. 

12. People and Cultures of Latin America. (3 or 4) Ethnographic focus on the 
?ments and processes of contemporary Latin American cultures. P — Anthropology 
>1 or Anthropology 152 or permission of instructor. 



60 

343. Anthropology and Developing Nations. (3 or 4) Analytic survey of problei 
facing emerging nations and the application of anthropology in culture-chan 
programs. P — Anthropology 151 or Anthropology 152 or permission of instruct* 

344. Medical Anthropology. (3 or 4) The impact of Western medical practices aj 
theory on non- Western cultures and anthropological contributions to the solving 
world health problems. P — Anthropology 151 or permission of instructor. 

351. Physical Anthropology. (3 or 4) Introduction to biological (physical) anthrop 
logy; human biology, evolution, and variability. P — Anthropology 151. 

352. Laboratory Methods in Physical Anthropology. (1) Basic methods utilized 
physical anthropologists to gather data, such as blood grouping, measuremei 
dermatoglyphics, and dental castings. Lab — two hours. P — Permission of instructs 

353. Peoples and Cultures of Africa. (3 or 4) The ethnology and prehistory of Neg 
Africa south of the Sahara. P — Anthropology 151 or Anthropology 152. 

354. Primitive Religion. (3 or 4) The worldview and values of non-literate cultures 
expressed in myths, rituals, and symbols. P — Anthropology 151 or Anthropoid 
152. 

355. Language and Culture. (3 or 4) An introduction to the relations betwee 
language and culture, including methods for field research. P — Anthropology 151 ( 
Anthropology 152. 

356. Old World Prehistory. (3 or 4) Introduction to prehistoric archeology; field an 
laboratory techniques, with a survey of world prehistory. P — Anthropology 151. 

358. The American Indian. (3 or 4) Ethnology and prehistory of the America 

Indian. P — Anthropology 151 or Anthropology 152. 

359. Prehistory of North America. (3 or 4) The development of culture in Nort 
America as outlined by archeological research, with an emphasis on paleoecology an 
sociocultural processes. P — Anthropology 151. 

360. Archeology of the Southeastern United States. (3 or 4) A study of huma 
adaptation in the Southeast from Pleistocene to the present, emphasizing the role 
ecological factors in determining the formal aspects of culture. P — Anthropolog 
151. 

361. Conservation Archeology. (3 or 4) A study of the laws, regulations, policie 
programs, and political processes used to conserve prehistoric and historic cultur; 
resources. P — Anthropology 151 and Anthropology 359 or permission of instructoi 

362. Human Ecology. (3 or 4) The relations between man and the inorganic an 
organic environments as mediated by culture. P — Anthropology 15 1 or Anthropoh 
gy 152 or permission of instructor. 

364. Human Osteology. (3 or 4) A survey of human skeletal anatomy and analysi. 1 
emphasizing archeological and anthropological applications. P — Anthropology 15 
and permission of instructor. 



61 



J5. Field Research in Physical Anthropology. (2, 3, or 4) Training in techniques 
>r the study of problems of physical anthropology, carried out in the field. Usually 
fered in January or in the summer. P — Permission of instructor. 

i6. Human and Non-Human Evolution. (3 or 4) Investigation of primate and 
jman evolution, both in anatomy and in behavior. P — Anthropology 151 and 
ermission of instructor. 

71. European Peasant Communities (3 or 4) Lectures, reading, and discussion on 
■lected communities and their sociocultural context, including folklore, folk art, and 
processes of culture change. P — Anthropology 151 or Anthropology 152 or permis- 
sion of instructor. 

80. Anthropological Statistics. (3 or 4) Basic statistics, emphasizing application in 
nthropological research. (A student who receives credit for this course may not also 
?ceive credit for Biology 248, Business 201, Mathematics 157, or Sociology 380.) 

81, 382. Archeological Research. (4, 4) The recovery of anthropological data 
irough the use of archeology, taught in the excavation and interpretation of a 
rehistoric site. P — Anthropology 151. 

83, 384. Field Research in Cultural Anthropology. (4, 4) Training in techniques for 
3 ie study of foreign cultures, carried out in the field. P — Anthropology 151 or 
inthropology 152. 

85, 386. Special Problems Seminar. (3 or 4) Intensive investigation of current 
icientific research within the discipline which concentrates on problems of contem- 
porary interest. P — Permission of instructor. 

87. Advanced Statistical Analysis in Anthropology. (3 or 4) Principles of multi- 

ariate statistical analysis and applications to anthropological problems. P — 

vnthropology 380. 
i, 
■88. Senior Seminar. (3 or 4) A review of the contemporary problems in the fields of 

rcheology and physical and cultural anthropology. P — Senior standing or permis- 

ion of instructor. 

>98, 399. Individual Study. (1,2, 3, or 4) A reading, research, or internship course 
iesigned to meet the needs and interests of selected students, to be carried out under 
he supervision of a departmental faculty member. 




62 

Art 

Robert Knott, Chairman 

Visiting Professor Terisio Pignatti (Venice) 

Associate Professors Robert Knott, Margaret S. Smith 

Assistant Professors Brian Legakis, John R. Sale 

Lecturers David Bindman (London), Marvin S. Coats 

Instructors Gary A. Cook, Andrew W. Polk III 

Gallery Director Victor Faccinto 

The department offers courses in the history of art and in the practice of drawm 
painting, printmaking, and sculpture. The program is designed to introduce sti 
dents to the humanistic study of the visual arts. The courses are intended to increa^ 
the student's understanding of the meaning and purpose of the arts and thr 
historical developments, their role in society, and their relationship to other humani: 
tic disciplines. The work in the classroom and studio is designed to intensify th 
student's visual perception and to develop a facility in a variety of technical processe 
A visiting artist program and varied exhibitions in the gallery of the Scales Fine An 
Center supplement the regular academic program of the department. 

Art History* 

103. Introduction to the Visual Arts. (4) An introduction to the arts of varioi 
cultures and times, with discussions of technique, style, methodology, and terms. Ma 
be used to satisfy a requirement in Division I. 

221. Idea and Form in Indian Art. (4) An examination of Indian ideas on the sacre 
and profane as revealed in architectural and sculptural forms in Hindu, Buddhis 
and Muslim art in India. 

224. Oriental Art. (4) A survey of the architecture, painting, and sculpture of Chin 
and Japan from the prehistoric period to 1900. 

225. Primitive Art. (4) A survey of the traditional arts of Africa south of the Sahai 
Polynesia, New Guinea, Australia, pre-Columbian Central and South America, an 
North America. 

227. Art of the Ancient Near East. (4) A survey of architecture, painting, an 
sculpture of Egypt, Mesopotamia, and Anatolia, with an introduction to prehistor 
European art. 

228. Egyptian Art. (4) The art and architecture of ancient Egypt from the predynas 
tic period through Roman Egypt. Usually offered in January. 

230. African Art. (4) The traditional arts of Africa south of the Sahara. 

231. American Art. (4) The survey of American painting from 1600 to 1900. 

233. American Architecture. (4) A survey of American architecture from 1600 t< 
1900, with emphasis on the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. 



''Open to qualified freshmen and sophomores 



63 

$5. The Arts in America. (4) A cultural and historical survey of the arts in America 
om early settlement to the present day. Attention is given to architecture, painting, 
ulpture, decorative arts, graphic arts, photography, and some commercial images 
; expressions of their time. 

II. Ancient Art. (4) A survey of architecture, painting, and sculpture from the 
rehistoric through the late Roman periods. 

42. Minoan and Mycenaean Art. (4) A survey of the architecture, painting, and 
:ulpture of the Minoan and Mycenaean civilizations. 

44. Greek Art. (3) A survey of architecture, painting, and sculpture from the 
rehistoric through the Hellenistic periods. 

45. Roman Art. (4) A survey of Etruscan and Roman architecture, painting, and 
i;ulpture. 

46. Greek and Roman Architecture. (4) A survey of classical architecture, from the 
'irchaic Greek, through the late Roman period. 

B 

'47. Myth and Legend in Classical Art. (4) A study of the major myths and legends in 
ireek and Roman painting and sculpture. 

48. The Ancient City. (4) An architectural approach to the emergence of civilization 
nd urbanism in the ancient world. 

49. Myth and Legend in Classical Art and Literature. (4) An investigation of the 
ftiyths and legends in ancient Greece and Italy, using examples of the art and 

iterature of the period. Art or classics credit determined at registration. Not open to 

tudents who have taken Art 247 or Classics 251. 
h 
j 150. Twentieth Century American Art and Literature. (4) An exploration of the 

deas, values, and feelings found in the art and literature of twentieth century figures 

uch as Kandinsky, Stevens, Picasso, and Kafka. 

151. Women and Art. (4) A historical examination of the changing image of women in 
irt from classical mythology through Christian iconography to the present day. 
Iffered in January. 

J52. Medieval Art. (4) A survey of painting and sculpture in Europe from 400 to 

1400. 



556. History of Books and Printing. (2—4) An examination of the development of the 
Dook from the invention of printing to the present. 

; 257. Printing on the Hand Press. (4) A study of the history of printing and books 
:ombined with the practical experience of learning the art and craft of printing. The 
objectives of the course are to provide a basis for the appreciation of fine printing and 
:o allow the student an opportunity to learn the techniques of hand printing. Offered 
in January. P — Permission of instructor. 

267. Early Italian Renaissance Art. (4) An introduction to the painting, sculpture, 
and architecture of Italy from 1250 to 1500, with a concentration on the arts in 
Florence of the fifteenth century. 



64 

268. Italian High Renaissance and Mannerist Art. (4) A study of the arts in Italy 
the sixteenth century, with emphasis on the achievement of Leonardo da Vine 
Raphael, Michelangelo, Giorgione, and Titian, and the dissolution of Renaissaiu 
idealism in the art of the early Mannerists. 

270. Northern Renaissance Art. (4) A survey of painting, sculpture, graphic art, an 
patronage in Northern European art from 1300 to the death of Dlirer in 1528. 

2712. Studies in French Art. (2) Lectures and field trips in French painting, sculptnt 
and architecture, concentrating on the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Offere 
in Dijon. 

272. Baroque Art. (4) A survey of European painting and sculpture from 1600 t 
1700. 

274. Christian Imagery in Art. (4) A survey of the major narratives, themes, saint: 1 
personages, signs, and symbols represented in Christian art from its emergence i 
antiquity to the Renaissance. 

281. Modern Art to 1900. (4) A survey of European painting and sculpture fror 
1700 to 1900, emphasizing the nineteenth century. 

282. Modern Art after 1900. (4) A survey of European and American painting anc 
sculpture from 1900 to the present. P — Art 281 is recommended. 

283. Impressionism. (4) A detailed study of the French Impressionist painters, witl 
some consideration of Impressionism in other art forms. 

284. Contemporary American Art. (4) An intensive study of American painting anc 
sculpture from 1950 to the present. 

286. Studies in Twentieth Century Art: Myth in Modern Art. (3) An analysis o 
traditional Western and non-Western myths as expressed and interpreted by twen 
tieth century artists. 

*291. Individual Study. (4) A course of independent study with faculty guidance 

*292. Individual Study. (4) A course of independent study with faculty guidance 

294. Modern Architecture. (4) A survey of European and American architecture 
from 1750 to the present, emphasizing the twentieth century. 

295. Studio Seminar. (2, 4) Offered by members of the faculty or visiting faculty on a 
topic of their choice and related studio activities. P — Permission of instructor. 

296. Art History Seminar. (4) Offered by members of the faculty on a topic of their 
choice. A paper is required. P — Permission of instructor. 

2320. English Art, Hogarth to the Present. (4) A survey of English painting, sculp 
ture, and architecture in the Georgian, Victorian, and modern periods. Slide lec- 
tures, student reports, museum visits, and lectures. Taught by a special lecturer 

Offered in London. 

2693. Venetian Renaissance Art. (4) A survey of the art of the Venetian Renaissance, 
with slide lectures and museum visits. Offered in Venice. 



^Offered on a four-, eleven-, or fifteen-week basis 



65 



Studio Art* 1 



] [. Introduction to Drawing and Design. (4) Introduction to the basic elements of 
t >dimensional and three-dimensional design, to include drawing, painting, and 
j lpture. Six class hours per week. 

),l. Introduction to Painting. (4) An introduction to painting fundamentals in a 
^ iety of contemporary styles in the oil or acrylic media. P — Art 111. 

|J5. Introduction to Sculpture. (4) An introduction to basic sculptural styles and 
l dia, with emphasis on contemporary concepts. I' — Art 111. 
(7. Introduction to Printmaking. (4) Concentrated introduction to one or more of 
l ' following areas of printmaking: lithography, intaglio, and silkscreen. P — Art 1 1 1. 

Wl. Intermediate Drawing. (4) Continuation of Art 111, with concentrated emph- 
s on drawing fundamentals and idea development in realistic and abstract styles, 
tphasizing composition, value, line, and form. Six class hours per week. P — Art 



t 



2. Intermediate Painting. (4) Continuation of Art 112, with concentrated em- 
asis on idea development. P — Art 1 12. May be repeated. 

5. Intermediate Sculpture. (4) Continuation of Art 1 15, with emphasis on idea 
■velopment. P — Art 115. May be repeated. 

7. Intermediate Printmaking. (4) Continuation of Art 1 17, with emphasis on idea 
velopment. P — Art 117. May be repeated. 

8. Figure Drawing. (4) Introduction to figure drawing. 

1 9. Advanced Sculpture. (4) A course of individual study with faculty guidance, 
t ''ay be repeated. P — Art 215. 

!2. Advanced Painting. (4) A course of individual study with faculty guidance. Mav 
! • repeated. P — Art 212. 

I !3. Advanced Drawing. (4) A course of individual study with faculty guidance. May 
r jt repeated. P — Art 211. 

9. Advanced Printmaking. (4) A course of individual study with faculty guidance. 
-Art 217. May be repeated. 

Asian Studies 

Balkrishna Govind Gokhale, Director 



i l The Asian Studies program, established in I960 with financial assistance from the 
ary Reynolds Babcock Foundation, is interdisciplinary in its nature and involves the 

1 ! >operation and resources of several departments in the humanities and social 
iences. Its objectives are to broaden the traditional curriculum with the infusion of a 

» j stematic knowledge and understanding of the culture of Asia. 

sian Studies 211, 212. Asian Studies. (4, 4) Asian thought and civilization. Some 
miinant themes in Asian thought and their influence on Asian civilizations. 

r erequisites may be waived with permission of instructor. 



66 

Art 221. Idea and Form in Indian Art. (4) An examination of Indian ideas on J 
sacred and profane as revealed in architectural and sculptural forms in Hin< 
Buddhist, and Muslim art in India. 



■in 



Chinese 111, 112. Elementary Chinese. (4, 4) Emphasis on the developmei 
listening and speaking skills in Mandarin. Brief introduction to the writing systc 
and to basic sentence patterns. Lai) — one hour. 

Hindi 111, 112. Elementary Hindi. (4, 4) Attention mainly to basic Hindi gramm 
vocabulary building, simple composition, and conversation. Lai) — one hour. 

Hindi 153. Intermediate Hindi. (4) Advanced practice in Hindi composition at 
conversation and introduction to literary Hindi. Lai) — one hour. P — Hindi 111,1 
or equivalent. 

Hindi 211. Hindi Literature. (4) Reading and translation of selected texts in pic 
and poetry and journalistic Hindi. Lai) — one hour. P — Hindi 153. 

History 341. Southeast Asia from 1511 to the Present. (4) A survey of the history a 
culture of Southeast Asia under Western colonial systems, with special reference 
economic, social, and cultural developments, the rise of nationalism, and the em< 

gence of new nation-states. 

History 342. The Middle East from Suleiman the Magnificent to the Present. ( 

Major subjects covered are the rise and fall of the Ottoman Empire, the Arabs aij 
Persians under Ottoman hegemony, the rise of Arab nationalism, and the emergen 
of the modern Arab states and their roles in the post-World War II era. 

History 343. Imperial China. (4) Development of traditional institutions in Chine 
society to 1644; attention to social, cultural, and political factors, emphasizing co 
tinuity and resistance to change. 

History 344. Modern China. (4) The Manchu Dynasty and its response to t 
Western challenge, the 1911 Revolution, the warlord era and the rise of the Coi 
munists, Chinese Communist society, and the Cultural Revolution. 

History 345, 346. History and Civilization of South Asia. (4, 4) An introduction 
the history and civilization of South Asia, with emphasis on historical developments 
the social, economic, and cultural life of the area. 

History 347. India in Western Literatures. (4) A one-semester historical survey 
images of India in Western literatures, with special reference to religious and phil 
sophical ideas, art, polity, society, and culture. 

History 349, 350. East Asia. (4, 4) An introduction to the social, cultural, and politic 
development of China, Japan, and Korea. Fall, to 1600; spring, since 1600. 

Politics 234. Government and Politics of East Asia. (4) An analysis of the politic 
institutions and processes in China and Japan, with emphasis on the problems 
modernization. 



Politics 245. Government and Politics of South Asia. (4) A study of the governmei 
of India, Pakistan, Nepal, and Ceylon; emphasis on political organizations, par 
structures, and subnational governmental systems. 






67 

I ligion 360. Hinduism. (4) A study of the fundamental features of the Hindu 
t dition. 

I ligion 361. Buddhism. (4) A study of the Buddhist tradition, its fundamental 
f tures, and its impact on the cultures of Asia. 

Biology 

Gerald W. Esch, Chairman 

] rfessors Charles M. Allen, Gerald W. Esch, Walter S. Flory, Raymond E. Kuhn, 

James C. McDonald, Robert L. Sullivan, Raymond L. Wyatt 

sociate Professors Ralph D. Amen, John F. Dimmick, Ronald V. Dimock Jr., 

A. Thomas Olive, Mary Beth Thomas, Peter D. Weigl 

Assistant Professors Ramunas Bigelis, Herman E. Eure, Hugo C. Lane 

Visiting Assistant Professor Sandra J. Newell 

Adjunct Professors Harold O. Goodman, Stephen H. Richardson 

Adjunct Associate Professor J.Whitfield Gibbons 

Research Associate Frank M. Hatcher 

At the end of the sophomore year a student electing to major in biology meets with 
najor adviser to plan the course of study for the junior and senior years. The 
quirements for completion of the major are those in effect at the time of the 
nference, since the curriculum and departmental requirements may change slight- 
- during the student's period of residence. All majors are required to take Biology 
-,1, 150, 151, 152, and at least one course from the following series: Biology 325, 
7, 328, 338, or 355. Co-major requirements are Chemistry 1 1 1 and 1 12 and two 
ditional courses in the physical sciences. 

For students declaring majors in the spring, the requirement for a major is a 
nimum of forty-one credits in biology. The forty-one credits must include at least 
. biology courses carrying five credits. A minimum grade average of C on all courses 
lempted in biology in the College is required for graduation with a major in biology, 
ludents declaring a major later than the spring should consult with a biology major 
viser for the specific major requirement at that time.) 

f Prospective majors are strongly urged to take Chemistry 111, 112 and Biology 111, 
LiO in the freshman year. They are advised to take Biology 151 and Biology 152 in 
e sophomore year, as well as organic chemistry. Deviations from this pattern may 
cessitate summer work to fit the basic courses into an orderly sequence. 
Advanced work in many areas of biology may require additional courses in mathe- 
itics, the physical sciences, and other areas of biology. The adviser calls these to the 
entionof the student, depending on individual needs. All 300-level biology courses 
, esume a background equivalent to introductory and intermediate biology (that is, 
rough Biology 152). 

Highly qualified majors are invited by the department to apply for admission to the 
mors program in biology. To be graduated with the distinction "Honors in Bio- 
gy," they must complete a research project under the direction of a staff member 
d pass a comprehensive oral examination. 



68 

111. Biological Principles. (5) Fundamental principles and concepts in bioiogi 
Lab — three hours. 



150. Organismic Biology. (5) Morphology and phylogeny of plants and animals 
Lai) — three hours. P — Biology 1 1 1 or permission of instructor. 

151. Cell Biology. (5) Molecular and cellular aspects of biology. Lab — three hours. 
P— Biology 1 1 1 and Chemistry 111, 112. 

152. Population Biology. (4) Population and evolutionary aspects of biology. P— 
Biology 1 1 1 or by permission of instructor. 



153. Population Biology-Laboratory. ( 1 ) Held and laboratory studies of populatioi 

biology. To be taken simultaneously with Biology 152. 

301, 302. Internship. (4,4) Off-campus work/study in the public or private sector. A 
written research paper or report based on the experience is required. The stuclni 
must have a supervisor on the job and a biology faculty member to sponsor ih< 
project. Only four credits per term permitted. Pass/Fail. Not to be counted towan 
major. Offered in January. 

312. Genetics. (5) A study of principles of inheritance and their application to plant 
and animals, including man. Laboratory work in the methods of breeding som< 
genetically important organisms and of compiling and presenting data. Lai) — three 
hours. 

314. Evolution. (4) Analysis of the theories, eyidences, and mechanisms of evolution 

320. Chordates. (5) A study of chordate animals, with emphasis on comparative 
anatomy and phylogeny. Dissection of representative forms in the laboratory. Lab 
lour hours. 

321. Parasitology. (5) A survey of protozoan, helminth, and arthropod parasite' 
from the standpoint ol morphology, taxonomy, life histories, and host/parasii( 
relationships. Lab — three hours. 

323. Animal Behavior. (4) A survey of laboratory and field research on anima 
beha\ior. (May count as biology or psychology but not both; choice to be determinet 
at registration.) 

324. Botany for Everyday Use. (4) A course to develop a knowledge and appreciatioi 
of common plants and plant products and plant handling. Not to be taken for credi 
toward major. Pass/Fail only. Offered in January. 

325. Plant Anatomy. (5) A study of comparative anatomy of the vascular plants, will 
emphasis on phylogeny. Lai) — four hours. 

326. Microbiology. (5)The structure, function, and taxonomy of microorganism 
with emphasis on the bacteria. Some immunological processes are considered. Lab- 
four hours. 

327. Nonvascular Plants. (5) An examination of representative nonvascular plants 
with emphasis on morphology and phvlogenv. Lab — four hours. 



1 






69 

8. Vascular Plants. (5) A comparative survey of the vascular plants, with emphasis 
structure, reproduction, classification, and phylogeny. Lab — four hours. 

1 1. Invertebrates. (5) Systematic study of invertebrates, with emphasis on functional 
orphology, behavior, ecology, and phylogeny. Lab — three hours. 

/3. Vertebrates. (5) Systematic study of vertebrates, with emphasis on evolution, 
ivsiology, behavior, and ecology. Laboratory devoted to systematic, field, and 
perimental studies. Lab — four hours. 

14. Entomology. (5) A study of insects, with emphasis on structure, development, 
xonomv, and phylogeny. Lab — four hours. 

$8. Plant Taxonomy. (5) A study of the classification of seed plants, with emphasis 
i i the comparative study of orders and families. Lah> — four hours. 

40. Ecology. (5) Interrelationships among living systems and their environments; 
ructure and dynamics of major ecosystem tvpes; contemporary problems in eco- 
gy. Lat> — four hours. 

11. Marine Biology. (5) An introduction to the physical, chemical, and biological 
arameters affecting the distribution of marine organisms. Lai) — three hours. 

42. Aquatic Ecology. (5) A course designed to cover the general principles and 
^ncepts of limnology and aquatic biology as thev apply to lentic and lotic habitats. A 
lajor portion of the field study is centered at the Charles M. Allen Biological Station, 
ab — three hours. 

44. Population and Evolutionary Biology. (5) Readings and discussions of topics in 
Uolutionary ecology, including population dynamics, life historv strategies, competi- 
'on, niche theory, resource partitioning and community structure, species diversity, 

nd ecological successions. Lab — three hours. 

1 47. Ecologic History of the Great Plains. (4) A consideration of the ecology of the 
.reat Plains as it affected the Indian and Anglo cultures of the nineteenth century. 
lot to be counted toward major. Pass/Fail only. Offered in January. 

48. Quantitative Biology. (4) An introduction to statistical methods used by 
iologists, including descriptive statistics, hypothesis-testing, analysis of variance, and 
egression and correlation. (A student who receives credit for this course may not also 
eceive credit for Business 201, Mathematics 157, Sociology 380, or Anthropology 

80.) 

51. Animal Physiology. (5) Nerve, muscle, and regulation physiology offered in 
ven-numbered years; digestion, absorption, and transport in odd-numbered years, 
-ab — three hours. 

52. Nutritional Physiology. (4) Deals with nutritional needs of college-age students 
nd the areas where diets are usually deficient. Not to be counted toward major. 
'ass/Fail only. Offered in January. 

'54. Endocrinology. (4) A course in vertebrate physiological endocrinology, with 
>articular reference to phylogenesis and embryology, including a section on inverte- 
•rate endocrinology. 



70 

355. Developmental Physiology. (5) A functional study of the growth, development, 
and reproduction of selected organisms, with emphasis on the regulatory mechan- 
isms of morphogenesis. Lab — three hours. 

357. Cryptobiology. (5) An examination of common hypobiotic rest exhibited h\ 
living systems, including a consideration of quiescence, dormancy, diapause, hiber- 
nation, estivation, sleep, coma, and death. Designed to locus attention on hypobiotii 
states which border on senescence and death, to more clearly distinguish living from 
dead conditions. Various biological materials in a state of rest examined. Lab — three 
hours. 

360. Development. (5) A study of development, including aspects of vertebrate, 
invertebrate, and other developmental systems, emphasizing the regulation of dif- 
ferentiation. Lai) — four hours. 

362. Immunology. (4) A study of the components and protective mechanisms of the 
immune system. 



M 



"' 



370. Biochemistry. (5) A lecture and laboratory course in biochemistry, including 
principles of biochemistry, chemical composition of living systems, intermediary 

metabolism, enzyme kinetics, biochemical techniques, and biochemical energetics. 
Lab — three hours. 

372. Histology. (5) A study of the structure and function of cells, tissues, and organs, 
with laboratory for examination of prepared histological slides. Lab — three hours. 
P— Biology 151. 

374. Microtechnique. (4) An introduction to the biological application of light and 
electron microscopy. Not to be taken for credit toward major. Lecture/lab — six hours. 
P — Biology 151 and permission of instructor. 

376. Icthyology. (5) A comparative study of structure/function, classification, and 
phytogeny of Fish. Lai) — three hours. 

382. Human Heredity. (4) A study of the principles of heredity as applied to man. 
Emphasis on inheritance of both usual and aberrant human phenotvpes. (Either 
Biology 312 or Biology 382 may be taken for credit toward major, but not both.) 
Offered in January. 

391, 392. Special Problems in Biology. (2, 2) Independent library and laboratory 
investigation carried out under the supervision of a member of the staff. Pass/Fail or 
for grade at discretion of the instructor. P — Permission of instructor. 

393,394. Special Problems in Biology. (2, 2) Courses designed for students who wish 
to continue special problems beyond Biology 391 and 392. Pass/Fail optional. Not to 
be counted toward major. P — Permission of instructor. 

395. Philosophy of Biology. (4) A seminar course dealing with the philosophical 
structure of the biological sciences, including an examination of major conceptual 
schemes and theoretical ideas unique to biology. 

397. Seminar in Biology. (2—4) Consideration of major biological topics through 
intensive reading and discussions. 



i 



71 

! 8. Scientific Communications. (3) An introduction to bibliographic and graphic 
>thods, including microscopy, photography, scientific illustration and writing, and 

Reparation of manuscripts. Not to be counted for credit toward degree in biology. 
)en to juniors or by permission of instructor. 

Business and Accountancy 

Delmer P. Hylton, Chairman 

Professors Delmer P. Hylton, Jeanne Owen 

Associate Professors Leon P. Cook Jr., Stephen Ewing, Thomas C. Taylor, 

Arun P. Dewasthali 
| Assistant Professor A. Sayeste Daser 

Lecturer Glenn L. Clark Jr. 
Instructors John B. Coullard, Lee G. Knight, Olive S. Thomas 

Students who major in business or in accountancy must take one course in mathe- 
matics and two semesters of principles of economics and before admission as a major 
ust have a minimum grade point average of 2.0. A minimum grade point average of 
on all work attempted in the Department of Business and Accountancy is re- 
hred for graduation with a major in business or accountancy. 

Business 

The Bachelor of Science degree in business is offered for the student who antici- 
pates a career in the business world. The curriculum is designed to equip the student 

ith basic tools and knowledge which should enable him or her to perform adequate- 

in the first position and to advance to more responsible positions in management. 
i For the major in business, a minimum of thirty-six credits earned in the depart- 
ment is required. Included in the major must be Accountancy 1 1 1 and 1 12; Business 

)1, 202, 21 1, 221, 231, 261; and one course from the following; Business 212, 222, 
32, or 241. A minimum of twenty-eight credits in the major must be earned in the 
lollege. 

Students with a grade point average of at least 3.0 on all college work and 3.3 on all 

ork in business are invited to apply lor admission to the honors program in business. 
hi project, paper, or readings and/or an oral examination are required. Those who 
uccessfullv complete the requirements specified by the department are graduated 

ith the designation "Honors in Business." For additional information interested 
. udents should consult a member of the departmental faculty. 

The departments of mathematics and business and accountancy offer a joint major 
'ading to a Bachelor of Science degree in mathematics-business. This interdisciplin- 
ry program prepares students for careers in business with a strong background in 
lathematics. The major consists of the following course requirements: Mathematics 
1 11, 112, 155, 157. and 256 or 355; Accounting 111, 112; Business 211, 221, 231; 
ither Business 201 or Mathematics 357; either Business 202 or Mathematics 253; 
nd two additional courses chosen from Accounting 252, 278, Business 281, Mathe- 
latics 121, 348, 353, 381, or specially designed January courses. 



72 

Highly qualified majors may be invited to apply for admission to the honors 
program in the joint major. To he graduated with the designation "Honors inl 
Mathematics-Business," they must complete a senior research paper and pass ] 
comprehensive oral examination on the project. For additional information in- 
terested students should consult a member of the departmental faculty. 
170. Survey of Data Processing. (4) A management-oriented presentation of 'vocab- 
ulary, concepts, and trends in information systems. Effective management of EDP 
systems and current research in the field are examined. P— Accountancy 1 12. 

201. Quantitative Methods I. (4) Techniques of analysis of numerical data, including 
descriptive statistics, linear correlation and regression, statistical estimation, and 
hypothesis-testing. P — Mathematics 157. 

202. Quantitative Methods II. (4) Decision theory emphasizing the combined use of 
information from historical data, subjective judgments, and sampling results in 
business decision-making. Nonparametric statistics and linear programming models 
included. P — Business 201. 

211. Organization and Management. (4) The study of the basic management func- 
tion, principles, concepts, and practices in the operation of a modern business 
organization. P — Junior standing. 

212. Advanced Management. (4) A study of the techniques of decision-making using 

case analyses, problem-solving, and report-writing procedures based on extensive 
readings. P — Business 211. 

221. Principles of Marketing. (4) Survey of marketing structures, concepts, and 
motivation of current marketing environment. Study of managerial decisions neces- 
sary in the distribution of industrial and consumer goods. P — Economics 152. 

222. Advanced Marketing. (4) A study of marketing management's generation and 
use of explanatory and predictive data concerning consumer market behavior. 
P— Business 201 and 221. 

223. International Marketing. (4) An analysis of the nature, organization, and 
methods of marketing at the international level, including the functions and prob- 
lems of international trade centers and involving a visit to a trade center. Usually 
offered in January. P— Business 221 and permission of instructor. 

231. Financial Management. (4) Analysis of financial decision-making at the level of 
the individual business enterprise. P — Accountancy 112. 

232. Advanced Financial Management. (4) Management decision-making applied to 
the financial function, including credit, investment, and related problems P— 
Business 201 and 231. 

235. Personal Finance. (4) A study of methods for achieving goals related to indi- 
vidual financial problems. Not to be counted toward major. P— Permission of in- 
structor. 

241. Labor Policy. (4) A study of selected topics in labor management relations from 
the view of labor, management, and the public. 



73 

1. Legal Environment of Business. (4) A study of the legal environment within 
lich business decisions must be made. 

1. Reading and Research. (2, 3, or 4) An advanced course devoted to individual 
ading and research in business. P — Permission of instructor. 

Accountancy 

The Bachelor of Science degree in accountancy is offered to students who expect to 
irsue a career in the accounting profession. The curriculum is deigned to equip the 
jdent for staff and managerial positions in public accounting and industrial 
counting and similar positions in non-profit institutions. A student who completes 
e degree in accountancy is eligible to sit for the CPA examination in North 
arolina. 

The major in accountancy requires a minimum of fifty-two credits earned in the 
Apartment. Required courses are Accountancy 111, 112, 151, 152, 252, 261, 271, 
id 273, and Business 201, 231, and 261. A minimum of forty-one credits in the 
, ajor must be earned in the College. 

; Students with a grade point average of at least 3.0 on all college work and 3.3 on all 
ork in accountancy are invited to apply for admission to the honors program in 
rcountancy. A project, paper, or readings and/or an oral exam are required. Those 
ho successfully complete the requirements specified by the department are gradu- 
:ed with the designation "Honors in Accountancy." For additional information 
iterested students should consult a member of the departmental faculty. 

11. Accounting Principles I. (5) The basic accounting process and underlying 
rinciples pertaining to the preparation and interpretation of published financial 
atements. 

12. Accounting Principles II. (4) A continuation of Accountancy 1 1 1 and an 
'mphasis on managerial accounting. P — Accountancy 111. 

51. Intermediate Accounting. (4) A detailed analysis of theory and related prob- 

';ms for typical accounts on published financial statements. P — Accountancy 112. 
q 

52. Intermediate Accounting. (4) A continuation of Accountancy 151. P — 

accountancy 151. 

01. Business Law. (4) A study of the Uniform Commercial Code. Open only to 
enior majors. P — Business 261. 

!52. Cost Accounting. (4) An in-depth study of management accounting, including 
budgeting, product-costing, cost allocation, standard costs, transfer-pricing, dif- 
ferentia] analysis, and cost-behavior analysis. P — Accountancy 112. 

!53. Accounting Information Systems. (4) A study of functions performed by an 
idequate information system and methods and procedures necessary to supply 
tseful data, oriented toward computerized data processing. P — Accountancy 252. 

154. Accounting in the Not-f or- Profit Sector. (3 or 4) An examination of accounting 
heory and practice in governmental and eleemosynary organizations, including an 
-xamination of national income accounting. P — Accountancy 151. 



74 

261. Advanced Accounting Problems. (4) A study of the more complex problem* 
found in business operations, business combinations, reorganizations, and dissolu- 
tion. P — Accountancy 152. 

271. Income Tax Accounting. (5) Accounting for purposes of complying with tlu 
Internal Revenue Code. Preparation of personal and business tax returns. F — 
Acco u n t a n c v 152. 

273. Auditing. (4) Designed to familiarize the student with the CPA profession, with 
particular emphasis on the attest-f unction. P — Accountancy 152 and 252. 

275. CPA Review. (4) An intensive study of CPA-type problems found on the 
accounting practice and accounting theory sections of the CPA exam. P — 
Accountancy 252 and 261. 

278. Reading and Research. (2, 3, or 4) Directed study in specialized areas of 
accountancy. P — Permission of instructor. 

Chemistry 

H. Wallace Baird, Chairman 

Professors H. Wallace Baird, Phillip J. Hamrick Jr., Harry B. Miller, 

Ronald E. Noftle, John W. Nowell 

Associate Professors Paul M. Gross Jr., Roger A. Hegstrom 

Assistant Professors Willie L. Hinze, W. Douglas Hounshell, Charles F. Jackels, 

Susan C. Jackels, Michael J. Thomas 

The Bachelor of Arts degree in chemistry must include Chemistry 1 1 1 , 1 12 or 1 18, ' 
22 1 , 222, 34 1 , 342, 3b 1 ; mathematics through Mathematics 111; and Physics 111,112 
or its equivalent. Mathematics 112 should be taken before Chemistry 341. 

The Bachelor of Science degree in chemistry must include Chemistry 111, 1 1 2, or 
1 18, 221, 222, 334, 341, 342, 361, 371, 391, or 392; mathematics through Mathema- 
tics 112; and Physics 121, 122, or 111, 112. Other courses which are strongh 
recommended for the B.S. degree candidate are Mathematics 113, 121, and 25 1 and 
Physics 161, 162. 

Chemistry 231 is an elective course designed to strengthen the student's back- 
ground in analytical chemistry. Some professional schools specifically require such a 
course. 

Majors are required to complete on a letter grade basis the related physics and 
mathematics courses, both those which are required and those which are strongh 
recommended. Unless otherwise stated, all chemistry courses are open to chemistry 
majors only on a letter grade basis. 

An average of C in the first two years of chemistry is required of students who elect 
to major in the department. Admission to anv class is contingent upon satisfactory 
grades in prerequisite courses, and registration for advanced courses must be 
approved by the department. Candidates for either the B.A. or B.S. degree with a 
major in chemistry must have a C average in their required chemistry courses 
numbered 200 or above. 

The department is on the list of departments certified by the American Chemical 
Society. 



75 

Qualified majors are considered for honors in chemistry. To be graduated with the 
"designation "Honors in Chemistry," a student must complete satisfactorily Chemistry 
1 '39 1 , 392 or an independent study project approved by the department and an 

examination covering primarily the independent study project. For additional infor- 
lmation members of the departmental faculty should be consulted. 
1 Prospective majors are urged to take Chemistry 111, 1 1 2 in the freshman year. For 

B.S. majors the following schedule of chemistry and closely related courses is recom- 
I mended: 

( Freshman Sophomore Junior Senior 

(Chemistry 111, 112 Chemistry 221, 222 Chemistry 341, 342 Chemistry 361 

Mathematics 111, 112 Mathematics 113, 121 Chemistry 334 Chemistry 371 

Physics 121. 122 Physics 161, 162 Chemistry 391 or 392 

Mathematics 25 1 

1111, 112. College Chemistry. (5, 5) Fundamental chemical principles. Laboratory 
covers basic quantitative analysis. Lab — three hours. 

118. Principles of Chemistry. (5) Fundamental chemical principles, with emphasis 
on structural concepts. Laboratory work on basic quantitative analysis. Lai) — four 
hours. P — Chemistry 111 or permission of instructor. 

221, 222. Organic Chemistry. (5, 5) Principles and reactions of organic chemistry. 
Lab — four hours. P — Chemistry 1 12 or 118. 

231. Quantitative Analysis. (4) Principles and methods of quantitative analysis. 
I P — Chemistry 1 12. Lecture — two hours, Lab — four hours. Offered jail and spring. 

323. Organic Analysis. (4 or 5) 4 he systematic identification of organic compounds. 
Lab — four hours. P — Chemistry 222. 

324. Chemical Synthesis. (2 or 4) A library, conference, and laboratory course. 
Lab — four or eight hours. P — Chemistry 222. 

334. Chemical Analysis. (4 or 5) Theoretical and practical applications of modern 
methods of chemical analysis. Lab — four hours. C — Chemistry 341. 

341, 342. Physical Chemistry. (5, 5) Fundamentals of physical chemistry. Lab — four 
hours. P— Chemistry 112 or 118, Mathematics 111, Physics 111, 112, or 121, 122. 

361. Inorganic Chemistry. (5) Principles and reactions of inorganic chemistry. 
Lab — four hours. P — Chemistry 341. 

362. Inorganic Chemistry. (4) Continuation of principles of inorganic chemistry with 
practical applications to inorganic systems. P — Chemistry 361. 

371. Introductory Quantum Chemistry. (4) Introduction to the quantum theory and 
its application to chemical systems. P — Chemistry 342 or permission of instructor. 

381, 382. Chemistry Seminar. (0, 0) Discussions of contemporary research. Atten- 
dance required of B.S. chemistry majors in the junior and senior years. 

391, 392. Undergraduate Research. (2, 2) Undergraduate research. Lab — six hours. 



76 

Classical Languages 

Robert W. Ulery Jr., Chairman 

Professor Carl V. Harris 

Associate Professors John L. Andronica, Robert W. Ulery Jr. 

Visiting Assistant Professor Laura M. Stone 

Instructor Alice H. Zigelis 

The Department of Classical Languages offers three majors: Greek, Latin, ai 
classical studies. 

A major in Greek requires forty credits in the department. Thirty-two of the! 
credits must be in the Greek language. Classics 270 is also a requirement. 

For those who begin Latin with Latin 1 1 1 or 1 13, a major requires thirty-six credi 
in the department beyond the elementary level (111, 112 or 1 13). Twenty-eight < 
these credits must be in the Latin language. For those who begin in the College wit 
Latin 153, a major requires thirty-six credits in the department. Twenty-eight 
these credits must be in the Latin language. For those who begin with a 200-lev< 
course in the College, a major requires thirty-two credits in the department. Twent] 
four of these credits must be in the Latin language. 

A major in classical studies requires fifty-six credits. A minimum of thirty-si 
credits of course work must be taken in the department. A maximum of forty-eigl: 
credits in the department may be exceeded only if a student undertakes course wor 
in both Latin and Greek. The student must take a minimum of two courses at th 
200-level in either Greek or Latin and the following: Art 241 (Ancient Art), Classic 
265 (Greek Literature), Classics 272 (Latin Literature), Classics 270 (Greek Civilization} 
and Classics 271 (Roman Civilization). 

A maximum of sixteen credits may be taken in the following: Art 227 (Art of th 
Ancient Near Last), 252 (Medieval Art), 242 (Minoan and Mycenaean Art), 244 (Greek Art) 
245 (Roman Art), 246 (Greek and Roman Architecture); History 215, 216 (The Ancien 
World); Philosophy 201 (Ancient and Medieval Philosophy), 230 (Plato), 231 (Aristotle) 
Religion 3 1 7 (The Ancient Near East), 363 (Hellenistic Religions); Hebrew 111, 112, 1 53 
211. Other courses may be allowed with the permission of the department. 

The requirements for certification to teach Latin in high school are the same as tht 
requirements for a major in Latin. A major in classical studies serves as an appropri 
ate part of the program of studies required for certification to teach Latin in higl 
school. A student wishing to secure this certification should confer with the chairmai 
of the department. 

Highly qualified majors are invited by the department to apply for admission to th< 
honors program in Latin, Greek, or classical studies. To be graduated with th< 
designation "Honors in Latin," "Honors in Greek," or "Honors in Classical Studies," ; 
student must complete an honors research project and pass a comprehensive oral 
examination. For honors in Latin or Greek, at least two of the courses counted toward 
the major must be seminar courses; for honors in classical studies, at least one seminai 
course in Latin or Greek is required. For additional information members of the 
departmental faculty should be consulted. 



77 



Greek 



01. Intensive Introduction to Classical Greek. (4) Greek grammar; an introduction 
p the reading of Greek, designed especially for those who have no knowledge of 
Ireek and who are not contemplating further formal study of the Greek language. 

11, 112. Elementary Greek. (5, 5) Greek grammar; selections from Greek prose 
writers and poets. 

53. Intermediate Greek. (4) Grammar and Xenophon's Anabasis. Thorough drill in 

,) ivntax. 

Ml. Plato. (4) Selections from the dialogues of Plato. 

it i 

212. Homer. (4) Selections from the Iliad and the Odyssey. 

, (22 1 , 222. Selected Readings. (3, 3) Intensive reading courses designed to meet 
i 'individual needs and interests. 

'1231. The Greek New Testament. (4) Selections from the Greek New Testament. 



241. Greek Tragedy. (3) Euripides' Medea. This course includes a study of the origin 

and historv of Greek tragedy, with collateral reading of selected tragedies in transla- 
te . _ / s ' h s 
tion. Seminar. 

^242. Greek Comedy. (3) Aristophanes' Clouds. This course includes a study of the 
origin and historv of Greek comedy, with collateral reading of selected comedies in 
((translation. Seminar. 

pi 291, 292. Honors in Greek. (2, 2) Directed research for honors paper. 

i 

ji Latin 

111, 112. Elementary Latin. (4, 4) Introduction to Latin grammar. 

113. Elementary Latin. (5) Introduction to Latin grammar. Covers material of Latin 
111 and 1 12 in one semester. Not open to students who have had Latin 1 1 1 or 1 12. 

j 125. Medieval Latin. (4) An introduction to the literary language of Western Europe, 
r, A. D. 300— 1300; reading and discussion of the literature in the original and in 
English. 

(i 153. Intermediate Latin. (5) Grammar review and selected readings. 

211. Vergil. (4) Intensive readings from the Aeneid, with emphasis on literary values. 

212. Roman Historians. (4) A reading of the works of Sallust and Livv, with attention 
to historical milieu and the norms of ancient historiography. 

216. Roman Lyric Poetry. (4) An interpretation and evaluation of Uric poetry 
through readings fron a wide variety of the poems of Catullus and Horace. 

221. Tacitus. (4) A reading and critical analysis of the works of Tacitus. 

225. Roman Epistolography. (4) Selected readings from the correspondence of 
Cicero and Pliny the Younger and the literary epistles of Horace and Ovid. 

226. Roman Comedy. (4) Reading of selected comedies of Plautus and Terence, with 
a study of literary values and dramatic techniques. 



78 I 

241. Satire I. (3) Selected readings from Lucilius, Horace, and Juvenal. Atteniin 
given to the origin and development of the genre. Seminar. 

242. Satire II. (3) Readings from Petronius and the Lucius de Morte Claudii. Seminl 

243. Latin Readings. (3) A course designed to meet individual needs and interes 

250. Prose Composition. (2) 

261. Lucretius. (3) Readings from the De Return Natura, with attention to liter;/ 
values and philosphical impact. Seminar. 

262. Cicero. (3) Readings from Cicero's philosophical essays, with a survey of Ore 
philosophical antecedents. 

265. The Elegiac Poets. (3) Readings of Tibullus, Propertius, and Ovid, with stud) 
the elegiac tradition. Seminar. 

291, 292. Honors in Latin. (2. 2) Directed research for honors paper. 

Classics 

220. Greek and Latin in Current Use. (3) A systematic study of Greek and Latin lo 
words, roots, prefixes, and suffixes as elements of English and specialized voca 
ularies (e.g.. scientific and legal). 

249. Myth and Legend in Classical Art and Literature. (4) An investigation of tl 
mvths and legends of ancient Greece and Italy, using examples from the art an 
literature of the period. Art or classics credit determined at registration. Not open i 
students who have taken Art 247 or Classics 251. 

251. Classical Mythology. (4) A study of the most important mvths of the Greeks an 
Romans. Many of the myths are studied in their literary context. A knowledge of tli 
Greek and Latin languages is not required. 

252. Women in Antiquity. (3, 4) The course explores the place of women in Gree 
and Roman society, men's views of them, their views of themselves, and their contr 
button to society, through primary source readings from the ancient authors, 
knowledge of the Greek and Latin languages is not required. 

253. Greek Epic Poetry. (4) Oral epic poetry, with primary emphasis on the ///Want 
the Odyssey of Homer and the later development of the genre. A knowledge of th 
Greek language is not required. 

254. Roman Epic Poetry. (4) A study of the Latin treatment and development of th< 
literary form, with emphasis on Lucretius, Vergil. Ovid, and Lucan. A knowledge o 
the Latin language is not required. 

263. Tragic Drama. (4) A study of the origins and development of Greek tragedy an( 
its influence on Roman writers, with readings from Aeschylus, Sophocles, am 
Euripides. A knowledge of the Greek and Latin languages is not required. 

264. Greek and Roman Comedy. (4) Representative works of Aristophanes 
Menander, Plautus, and Terence, with attention to the origins and development ol 
comedy. A knowledge of the Greek and Latin languages is not required. 



Hen i 

,65. A Survey of Greek Literature. (4) A study of selections from Greek literature in 

English translation. A knowledge of the Greek language is not required. 

i hi 

i,'70. Greek Civilization. (3) Lectures and collateral reading upon those phases of 
e,f frjreek civilization which have particular significance for the modern world. A know- 
edge of the Greek language is not required. 

in h)!71. Roman Civilization. (3) Lectures and collateral reading upon the general 
iubject of Rome's contribution to the modern world. A knowledge of the Latin 
i anguage is not required. 

£72. A Survey of Latin Literature. (4) a study of selections from Latin literature in 

. English translation. A knowledge of the Latin language is not required. 

275. Ancient and Modern Rome. (4) Students trace the growth of Rome and Roman 
civilization, primarily through excursions to important archeological sites, visits to 
museums, lectures, and parallel readings. Usually offered in January. 

'276. Ancient and Modern Greece. (4) A guided tour of the museums and archeolo- 
gical sites of ancient Greece in their Byzantine and modern contexts, supplemented 
' by lectures on Greek and Cretan/Minoan civilization. Usually offered in January. 

; 288. Individual Study. (2-4) 

291, 292. Honors in Classical Studies. (2, 2) Directed research for honors paper. 



1 Economics 

f. 

J. Van Wagstaff, Chairman 

Professor J. Van Wagstaff 

Associate Professors Donald E. Frey, John C. Moorhouse 

Assistant Professors J. Daniel Hammond, Michael L. Wyzan 

Visiting Assistant Professor S. Hugh High 

Instructor Claire H. Hammond 

1 . . 

The objectives of the economics program are to help prepare students for effective 

participation in the decision-making processes of society, to develop analytical skills 

in solving economic problems, to promote a better understanding of alternative 

economic systems, and to provide a balanced curriculum to prepare students for 

graduate study or positions in industry and government. 
The major in economics requires a minimum of thirty-six credits in economics, 
' including Economics 151, 152, 201, and 202.* The department recommends that 
) majors take Mathematics 111, either to fulfill the Division II requirement or as an 

elective. 

The remaining courses for a major in economics and courses in related fields are 

selected by the student and the adviser. A minimum grade average of C on all courses 

attempted in economics is required for graduation. 



Economics 111 satisfies the requirement for Economics 151 and 152 by permission of the 
department. 



80 

Highly qualified majors are invited by the department to apply for admission to tfc 
honors program in economics. To be graduated with the designation "Honors! 
Economics," they must complete a satisfactory economics research project, pas,| 
comprehensive oral examination on the project, and complete Economics 281 or 21 
and Economics 288. For additional information members of the departmental fac • 
ty should be consulted. 

The departments of mathematics and economics offer a joint major leading la 
Bachelor of Science degree in mathematical economics. This interdisciplinary pi* 
gram, consisting of no more than fifty-six credits, affords the student an opportune 
to apply mathematical methods to the development of economic theory, models, aifc 
quantitative analysis. The major consists of the following course requiremenl 
Mathematics 111, 112, 113, 121, 251; Economics 151, 152, 201, 202, 203; a joi; 
seminar in mathematical economics; and three additional courses chosen wil 
approval of the program advisers. Students electing the joint major must recei| 
permission from both the Department of Economics and the Department of Math 
matics. 

Highly qualified majors may be invited to apply for admission to the bono 
program in the joint major. To be graduated with the designation "Honors 
Mathematical Economics," they must complete a senior research paper and pass 
comprehensive oral examination on the project. For additional information men 
bers of the department faculty should be consulted. 

111. Introduction to Economic Analysis. (4) A survey of the discipline for studen 
who wish to take only one course in economics. Elementary supply and deman 
analysis is considered, in addition to more general topics involving the formation ( 
national economic policy. (Credit is not granted for this course and Economics 151 < 
152.) 

151. Principles of Economics. (4) A study of individual economic units in a marla 
economy, with some attention to monopoly, labor unions, and poverty. 

152. Principles of Economics. (4) Attention is focused on the functioning of tli 
economy as a whole, with particular reference to employment, inflation, economi 
growth, and policy. P — Economics 151. 

170. Public Choice. (4) Traditional tools of economic analysis are employed ti 
explore such topics in political science as political organization, elections, coalitioi 
formation, the optimal provision of public goods, and the scope of government 
Usually offered in January. P — Economics 151, 152. 

172. International Finance. (4) A study of financial market behavior and exchange 
rate fluctuations in the financial capitals of Europe. Usually offered in January. P 
Economics 111 or 151, 152. 






188. Individual Study. (4) A student-initiated project involving reading and re 
search. Usually offered in January. P — Economics 1 1 1 or 151, 152and permission of tht 
department. 

201. Microeconomic Theory. (4) Develops the theory of consumer behavior and th( 
theory of the firm, with emphasis on price and output determination under various 
market conditions. P — Economics 151, 152. 



81 



02. Macroeconomic Theory. (4) A study of Keynesian and post-Keynesian theories 
11 ['bout the determination of the level of national income, employment, and economic 
f' il rowth. P — Economics 151, 152. 



)! 



i;03. Introduction to Econometrics. (5) Economic analysis through quantitative 
nethods, with emphasis on model construction and empirical research. 

» i!04. Economic Indicators. (2) The theory, construction, and interpretation of signi- 
ficant quantitative indicators of economic behavior, such as the unemployment rate 
unijind the various price indices. P — Economics 151, 152. 

1 !05. Seminar in Mathematical Economics. (3) Calculus and matrix methods used to 
tl 'levelop basic tools of economic analysis. P— Mathematics 111, 112 and Economics 
'151, 152. 

221. Public Finance. (4) An examination of the economic behavior of government. 
-Includes principles of taxation, spending, borrowing, and debt-management. P — 
Economics 151, 152. 

i i222. Monetary Theory and Policy. (3,4) A rigorous development of the theory of 
i supply and demand for money, plus the interrelationship among prices, interest 
v i rates, and aggregate output. P — Economics 151, 152. 

242. Labor Economics. (4) Economic analysis of wages and hours, employment, wage 
and job discrimination, investment in education, and unions. P — Economics 151, 
J 152. 

244. Industrial Organization. (3, 4) An analysis of market structure, with particular 
xference to organization practices, price formation, efficiency, and public regula- 
ion. P — Economics 151, 152. 



251. International Economics. (4) A study of international trade theory, balance of 
payments, foreign exchange, trade restrictions, and commercial policies. 
? — Economics 201. 



252. Economic Growth and Development. (3, 4) A studv of the problems of econom- 
ic growth, with particular attention to the less developed countries of the world. 
P — Economics 151, 152. 

255. Comparative Economic Systems. (3, 4) An objective examination of the theory 
and practices of various economic systems, including capitalism, socialism, and com- 
munism. P — Economics 151, 152. 

'256. Urban Economics. (4) Application of economic theory to suburbanization, land 
values, urban decay, zoning, location decisions of firms and households, and metro- 
politan fiscal problems. P — Economics 151, 152. 

1 

261. American Economic Development. (4) The application of economic theory to 

historical problems and issues in the American economy. P — Economics 151, 152. 

262. History of Economic Thought. (4) An historical survey of the main develop- 
i ments in economic thought from the Biblical period to the twentieth century. P — 

Economics 151, 152. 



82 

281, 282. Contemporary Economic Problems. (2, 2) An economic analysis of currH 
issues, with emphasis on contributions of economic theory to policy format™ 
Courses are taught sequentially during one semester. The student may take eitlf 
one or both courses. P — Permission of instructor. 

287. Senior Readings. (3, 4) A student/faculty seminar in which selected publicatius 
are analyzed and discussed. P — Permission of instructor. 

288. Economic Research. (4) 

Education 

Joseph O. Milner, Chairman 
Professors Thomas M. Elmore, John E. Parker Jr., Herman J. Preseren, 

J. Don Reeves 

Associate Professors John H. Litcher, Joseph O. Milner 

Assistant Professors Patricia M. Cunningham, Linda Nielsen, 

Leonard P. Roberge 

Visiting Lecturers Joseph Dodson, Corinne Schillin, 

Richard I. Tirrell 

Instructor Susan Melville 

Because Wake Forest University believes that the educational profession is impc 
tant to society and that the welfare of mankind is significantly affected by the quali 
of its educational leadership, one of the important objectives of the University h 
been and continues to be the preparation of teachers and other professional scho 
personnel. The University's commitment to quality in teacher education is demo 
strated by selective admission to the program, a wide range of professional course 
and closely supervised internships appropriate to the professional needs of student 

Prospective teachers either major in other academic areas and take educatk 
courses to earn secondary certification or earn intermediate, science, or social studi 
certification as majors in the Department of Education. Certification for the primai 
grades can also be earned by intermediate majors who wish to extend their range 
teaching certification. In addition to the professional program, the departmei 
provides elective courses open to all students. Such courses supplement the work < 
other departments and provide generally for the liberal education of students. 

Teacher Certification. The North Carolina State Department of Public Instructio 
issues the Professional Class A Teacher's Certificate to graduates who have con 
pleted an approved program, including the specified courses in their teaching f ield( 
and the prescribed courses in education, who have demonstrated specific competei 
cies, and who receive recommendations from the designated officials(s) of the 
teaching area(s) and from the chairman of the department or a deputy. 

Special students (those not having completed prior to graduation an approve 
certification program from this or another institution) are required to secure froi 
the department an analysis of their deficiencies and a plan for completing the Class 
Certificate. Information about certification requirements for other states can b 
secured from the department as assistance in planning a program to meet th 
certification requirements of those states. 



83 

Admission Requirements. Admission to the teacher education program normally 
ccurs during the sophomore year. Admission involves tiling an official application 
>J[jvith the department, being screened by faculty committees, and being officially 
pproved by the department. 

' Course Requirements. The approved program of teacher education requires candi- 
l[ ' lates to complete successfully a series of professional education courses. The exact 
equence of professional and academic courses varies with a student's particular 
)rogram and is determined in conference with the candidate. For those seeking 
econdary certification the majority of the professional work is taken during one 
emester of the senior year. Candidates for the intermediate certificate may begin 
:ourse work required for certification as early as the sophomore year. A cooperative 
igreement with Salem College gives education majors the additional opportunity to 
" )e certified in learning disabilities. 

Student Teaching. Prerequisites for registering for student teaching include (1) 
senior, graduate, or special student classification; (2) completion of school practicum 
ind foundations of education courses; (3) an average of at least C on all course work; 
4) an average of at least C on all courses taken in the area(s) of certification; (5) 
departmental approval for admission to the teacher education program. 

Students are assigned to student teaching opportunities by public school officials 
on the basis of available positions and the professional needs of the student and the 
p |()( public school system. (The University does not assume the responsibility for trans- 
portation to schools during student teaching.) For both secondary and intermediate 
j (Students one semester of the senior year is reserved for the student teaching experi- 
ence and the block of courses preparatory to that experience in the schools. Students 
may not take other courses during this semester without the approval of the Director 
of Teacher Education. 

Teaching Area Requirements 



English — Thirty-six credits, including four credits from courses numbered 160-175; 

at least sixteen credits from courses numbered 300—399; 323; 390. 
hFrench — Thirty-six credits, including French 153, 216 or 217, 219, 221, 224, or their 

equivalents; at least eight credits in French literature beyond 217. 

Spanish — Thirty-six credits, including Spanish 153, 215 or 216, 217, 22 1 , 223, 224, oi- 
ly their equivalents; eight credits from 225, 226, 227; at least four additional credits in 
L literature. 

| French and Spanish — Fifty-six credits, including French 1 53x, 2 1 6, 2 1 7, 22 1 , 222, and 
1,224, plus Spanish 153x; either 215 or 216; 219; 221; either 223 or 224; and eight 
' credits from 225, 226, 227, or their equivalents. 

German — Thirty-two credits, including German 153, 211, 212; eight credits from 
L German 217, 218, 219, 220; at least twelve credits in German literature beyond 212. 
r Latin — The requirements are the same as those for the major in Latin, 
f; Intermediate Education — Forty-two credits, including appropriate basic and divisional 
jl course requirements; eight credits in language arts; eight credits in social studies; 
I eight credits in science; eight credits in mathematics; four credits in music; four 

credits in humanities; two credits in physical education. Remaining certification 



84 

requirements are obtained through intermediate education courses and an acadei c 

concentration in one of the teaching areas of the intermediate grades. 

Mathematics — Forty credits, including Mathematics 111, 112, 113, 121, 221, 231, 33 

at least eight credits from other 300-level courses. 

Music— Forty-eight credits, including Music 171, 172, 173, 174, 181, 182, 186, lJ 

188; Education ^280, 282, 284, 289, and 291. 

Physical Education and Health — Forty-three credits, including Physical Education 2m 

221, 222, 224, 230, 240, 250, 353, 357, 360, 363; Biology 1 1 1 and 150. 

Science — Ten credits each in biology, chemistry, and physics; eight credits in math] 

matics; additional work in the area of concentration: biology (twenty credits), chem • 

try (twenty credits), or physics (seventeen credits). For certification in the individi I 

fields of science, the following are required: biology (thirty credits), chemistry (thii 

credits), or physics (twenty-seven credits). 

Social Studies — Forty-eight credits, including twenty-four credits in history, with 

least six to eight credits in United States history and six to eight credits in wor 

(European) history; twenty credits from politics, sociology, anthropology, ■ 

economics, with no more than eight credits in any one area; and four credits 

geography. For certification in the individual fields of the social studies, the followii 

are required: economics (twenty-four credits), politics (twenty-four credits), histo 

(twenty-four credits, with at least six to eight credits in United States history and six 

eight credits in world [European] history), and sociology (twenty-four credits). 

Speech Communication — Forty-four credits, including Speech Communication 12 

151 or 152, 153, 155 or 376, 161, 23 1, 252 or S355, 261, and 241 or 245 or 283, 28 

and two 300-level speech communication electives. 

Theatre Arts — Forty to forty-two credits, including Speech Communication 121, 15 

223, 23 1 , 226, 227, 283, 284, 332 or S324, and 327 or 328; English 329 or 323 or 36' 

Physical Education 162. 

Speech and Theatre — Fifty credits, including Speech Communication 121 or 241 < 

245, 151 or 152, 153, 155 or 376, 161 or 227, 231, 223, 226, 252 or S355, 261, 28 

284, 321, 322. 

Education courses required for a secondary or special subject certificate are Educ; 
tion 201, 202 or 203, 21 1 , 214, 251, 291 and 383. Education courses required for a 
intermediate certificate are Education 20 1 , 202 or 203, 211,221, 222, 25 1,271, 29: 
295, 296. 313, and 383. 

201. Foundations of Education. (4) Philosophical, historical, and sociological foui 
dations of education, including analysis of contemporary issues and problems. 

202 or 203. School Practicum. (2) Assigned experiences in elementary and secoi 
darv schools. Weekly seminar. Pass/Fail only. 

211. Educational Psychology. (4) The theories, processes, and conditions of effectiv 
teaching/learning. P — Education 201 or permission of instructor. 

214. The School and Teaching. (4) Organization of the school system; bases r 
education; the curriculum; major problems of education and teaching; the role of th 
teacher; psychological aspects of teaching. P — Education 201 and permission c 
instructor. 



85 



" 21. Children's Literature and Reading. (4) A survey of the types of literature 
ppropriate for the intermediate grades and an investigation of the basic problems in 
'feading. 

22. The Arts in the Intermediate Grades. (4) The development of skills in music and 
ine arts appropriate to the intermediate grades. 

■ ' 23. Health and Physical Education for the Intermediate Grades. (4) The develop- 
ment of physical education skills appropriate for the intermediate grade teacher and 
i 1 n understanding of the personal and community health needs appropriate for the 

ttiiijrade level. 

51. Student Teaching. (6) Observation and experience in school-related activities. 

Supervised student teaching. Pass/Fail only. P — Education 201 and permission of 

nstructor. 
Ik 
i !52. Student Teaching. (2) Observation and experience in the Primary Grades K— 3. 

■'ass/Fail. P — Permission of instructor. Offered in January. 

Is !7l. Introduction to Geography. (4) A study of the physical environment and its 
ii fi elationship to man, including an examination of climate, soils, water resources, and 
'< and forms found in various regions throughout the world. 

V J72. Geography Study Tour. A guided tour of selected areas to study physical, 
economic, and cultural environments and their influence on man. Background 
"'eferences for reading are suggested prior to the tour. 

280. Orchestration. (4) A study of the orchestral and wind band instruments, how 
composers have used them throughout history, and the development of practical 
^scoring and manuscript skills. Offered in alternate years. P — Music 174, 184. 

182. Conducting. (4) A study of choral and instrumental conducting techniques, 
I ncluding practical experience with ensembles. Offered in alternate years. P — Music 
$174, 184. 

284. Music Literature Seminar. (3 or 4) A survey of repertoire, including an exami- 
nation of teaching materials in the student's special area of interest. P — Music 174, 
184 and permission of instructor. 




Linda N. Nielsen of the Department of Education conducts a seminal 



86 



289. Ensemble Methods. (2) A practical study of choral and instrumental techniqu 
Discussion of tonal development, administration, bibliography, choral and i 
strumental repertoire, marching band, and instrumental problems. P — Music 101 
102 or permission of instructor. 

291. Methods and Materials. (4) Methods, materials, and techniques used in teachii 
the various subjects. P — Education 201 and permission of instructor. 

Teaching of English. Fall. 

Teaching of Foreign Language. Spring. 

Teaching of Mathematics. Spring. 

Teaching of Music. Fall. 

Teaching of Physical Education and Health. Spring. 

Teaching of Science. Fall. 

Teaching of Social Studies.FaU. 

Teaching of Speech Communication. Spring. 

Teaching of Theatre Arts. Fall. 

292. Primary Methods. (4) Classroom organization, teaching strategies, and mat 
rials appropriate to subjects taught in grades K— 3. P — Permission of instructor. 

293. Intermediate School Curriculum: Theory and Practice. (3) General principli 
of curriculum construction and teaching methods. Introduction to the use of audit 
visual materials and equipment. 

295. Methods and Materials for Teaching Language Arts and Social Studies. (4) 

survey of the basic materials, methods, and techniques of teaching the language ar 
and social studies in the intermediate grades. P — Permission of instructor. 

296. Methods and Materials for Teaching Science and Mathematics. (4) A survey ( 
the basic materials, methods, and techniques of teaching science and mathematics i 
the intermediate grades. P — Permission of instructor. 

301. Audiovisual Education. (4) Introduction to the field of audiovisual educatioi 
development and application of skills in the use of instructional materials, equi| 
ment, and programs. 

302. Production of Instructional Materials. (4) Methods of producing instruction, 
materials and other technological techniques. P — Education ,101. 

303. History of Western Education. (4) Educational theory and practice froi 
ancient times through the modern period, including American education. 

304. Theories of Education. (4) Contemporary proposals for educational theory an 
practice studied in the context of social issues. 

306. Studies in the History and Philosophy of Education. (4) A study of selecto 
historical eras, influential thinkers, or crucial problems in education. Topic 
announced annuallv. 

313. Human Growth and Development. (4) A studv of the intellectual, emotiona 
and physical components of growth from birth to adolescence, with special concei i 
for the educational implications of this process. 



87 

|3. Educational Statistics. (4) Descriptive, inferential, and nonparametric statistical 
1 ocedures involved in educational research. Not open to students who have taken 
ychology 211 and 212. P — Permission of instructor. 

U. Principles of Counseling and Guidance. (4) Counseling history, philosophy, 
eory, procedure, and process. Therapeutic and developmental counseling 
>proaches in guidance and personnel work in education, business, and community 
rvice agencies. 

S3. Reading in the Content Areas. (2) The course provides an introduction to 
aching the basic reading skills at the intermediate and secondary level; vocabulary, 
imprehension, reading rate, selection of texts, and critical and interpretive reading, 
irticularly stressed are diagnoses of reading problems and techniques for correct- 
g these problems in specific subject content areas. 

)1. Teaching the Gifted. (4) An investigation of theory and practice pertinent to 
achers of the gifted. 

93. Individual Study. (2, 4) A project in an area of study not otherwise available in 
ie Department of Education. Permitted upon departmental approval of petition 
resented by a qualified student. 

English 

Robert N. Shorter, Chairman 

Professors John A. Carter Jr., Doyle R. Fosso, Thomas F. Gossett, 

Alonzo W. Kenion, Elizabeth Phillips, Lee Harris Potter, Robert N. Shorter, 

Edwin Graves Wilson 

Associate Professors Nancy J. Cotton, Andrew V. Ettin, W. Dillon Johnston, 

Robert W. Lovett, William M. Moss 

Assistant Professors R. Edward Lobb, Blanche C. Speer 

Visiting Assistant Professors David G. Brailow, Gillian R. Overing, 

William A. Wilson 

Lecturers Dolly A. McPherson, Bynum Shaw 

Visiting Lecturer Judith J. Sherwin 

Instructors Patricia A. Johnson, Mark R. Reynolds, Susan G. Shillinglaw 

The major in English requires a minimum of forty credits, at least thirty-two of 

/hich must be in advanced language and literature courses numbered 300 to 399. 

hese courses must include Shakespeare, two additional courses in British literature 

efore 1800, one course in American literature, and, early in the major, one seminar. 

(Majors and their advisers plan individual programs to meet these requirements and 

'■o include work in the major literary types. 

The prerequisite for all 300-level courses in English is any one of the courses in 
British and American literature numbered 160, 165, 170, and 175, all of which are 
'ffered each semester. Additional courses in journalism and writing are offered by 
he department as related subjects but do not count toward an English major; they 
nay be taken as electives regardless of the field of study in which a student majors. 



: 



Highly qualified majors are invited by the department to apply in the secnd 
semester of their junior year for admission to the honors program in English 1 1 
graduate with "Honors in English," students must have a minimum grade pint 
average of 3.5 in the major and 3.0 in all course work and must satisfy the reqife- 
ments for English 388 during their senior year. Interested students may coi'ili 
departmental faculty members for further information. 

Unless otherwise indicated, any course in English may carry either three or ui 
credits. The amount of reading and writing is adjusted to the credit assigned foihi 
course. 

Lower Division Courses 

11. Composition Review. (0) Essentials of standard usage and the basic principl 
composition; frequent exercises. 

105. English Fundamentals. (2) Training in the fundamentals of written Eng h 

Satisfactory completion required for entry into English 1 10. Admission by placet! ni 
only; does not satisfy the basic composition requirement. 

"110. English Composition. (4) Training in expository writing; frequent essays b.i 
upon readings. 

N 112. English Composition and Literature. (3 or 4) Training in expository wriiii 
based on the reading of literature. F — Permission of the department. 

160. Survey of Major British Writers. (3 or 4) Eight to ten writers represeniig 
different periods and genres; primarily lecture. 

165. Studies in Major British Writers. (3 or 4) Three to five writers representig 
different periods; primarily discussion, with frequent short papers. Limited em 11- 
ment. 

170. Survey of Major American Writers. (3 or 4) Nine to eleven writers represen 
different periods and genres; primarily lecture. 

175. Studies in Major American Writers. (3 or 4) Three to five writers representtg 
different periods; primarily discussion, with frequent short papers. Limited enilB 
ment. 

180. Traditions of Humanity: The Libera! Arts. (2) A study of major concept 1 ) 
liberal education in the Western world. 

255. Recent American Poetry. (3 or 4) Selections from the poetry of Robert Pt 
Warren, Randall Jarrell, A. R. Amnions, James Dickev, Adrienne Rich, and Dei 
Levertov. 

299. Individual Study. (2—4) A course of independent study with faculty guidari 
By prearrangement. 



*Either 111) or 1 12 is a prerequisite for all other courses in English unless the basic requirement is war d. 
Either course fulfills the basic course requirement. 



89 

3 January Courses 

These courses, representative of the January curriculum, are not necessarily 
peated every year, but were offered in 1980. 

0. The Psychological Novel. (4) An examination of some unusual novels ol the last 
ntury or so, and the patterns of consciousness which give them fictional shape. 

01 115. The American Historical Novel. (4) An examination of the development of the 
nerican historical novel from nineteenth-century beginnings through the twen- 
•th century. 

12. Poetry in Its Irish Context. (4) A travel course focusing on the backgrounds of 
odern Irish poetry in Irish myth, history, politics, religion, archeology, architec- 
I lire, art, and music. 

►6. Early English Grammars. (4) A detailed investigation of early descriptions of 
i, ie English language, from the work of John Hart ( 1569) to that of Samuel Johnson 

#755). 

70. Contemporary Fiction: English and American Novels Since World War II. (4) 

( study of recent developments in English and American fiction as illustrated by 
mtemporary authors, with attention to critical theory. 



Journalism and Writing Courses 



70. Introduction to Journalism. (3 or 4) Survey of the fundamental principles of 
ews-gathering and news-writing; sttidv of news and news values, with some atten- 
on to representative newspapers. 

N72. Editing. (3 or 4) A laboratory course in copy-editing, headline-writing, typogra- 
hy, and make-up; includes both newspaper and magazine editing. P — English 270. 

76. Advanced Journalism. (3 or 4) Intensive practice in writing various types of 
ewspaper stories, including the feature article. Limited to students planning careers 
i journalism. P — English 270. 

78. History of Journalism. (3 or 4) A study of the development of American 
mrnalism and its English origins; detailed investigations of representative world 
( ewspapers. 

84. The Essay. (2) Primarily for those interested in writing for publication, with 
oncentration on writing various types of essays. P — Permission of instructor. 

85. Poetry Workshop. (2) A laboratory course in the writing of verse. Study of poetic 
?chniques and forms as well as works of contemporary poets. Frequent individual 
onferences. 

86. Short Story Workshop. (2) A study of the fundamental principles of short fiction 
riting; practice in writing; extensive study of short story form. F — Permission of 

istructor. 

83, 384. Theory and Practice of Verse Writing. (4, 4) Emphasis on reading and 
liscussing student poems in terms of craftsmanship and general principles. 



90 



Advanced Language and Literature Courses 



I 

304. History of the English Language. (3 or 4) A survey of the developmenol 
English syntax, morphology, and phonology from Old English to the present, <tli 
attention to vocabulary growth. 

310. Studies in Medieval Literature. (3 or 4) Selected readings from areas sue as 
religious drama, non-dramatic religious literature, romance literature, litem 
theory, and philosophy. 

315. Chaucer. (3 or 4) Emphasis on The Canterbury Tales and Troilus and Criseyde, \&i 
some attention to minor poems. Consideration of literary, social, religious, id 
philosophical background. 

320. English Drama to 1642. (3 or 4) English drama from its beginning to K2. 
exclusive of Shakespeare. Representative cycle plavs, moralities, Elizabethan ,id 
Jacobean tragedies, comedies, and tragicomedies. 

323. Shakespeare. (3 or 4) Twelve representative plays illustrating Shakespeat's 
development as a poet and dramatist. 

325. Studies in English Literature, 1500—1660. (3 or 4) Selected topics, prose, .id 
poetry from the sixteenth or seventeenth centuries, exclusive of drama and Milt n. 
Emphasis on Elizabethan lyrics and Spenser or on Donne and the Metaphysical po s. 

327. Milton. (3 or 4) The poetry and selected prose of John Milton, with emphasi^n 
Paradise Lost. 

330. English Literature of the Eighteenth Century. (3 or 4) Representative pot 
and prose, exclusive of the novel, 1700— 1800, drawn from Addison, Steele, Def 
Swift, Pope, Johnson, Boswell, Goldsmith, and Burns. Consideration of cultd 
backgrounds and significant literary trends. 

332. Satire. (3 or 4) The nature of the satiric form and the satiric spirit as revead 
through reading and critical analysis of significant examples, mostly English a'ti 
American. 

335. Eighteenth Century Fiction. (3 or 4) Primarily the fiction of Defoe, Richards!, 
Fielding, Smollett, Sterne, and Austen. 

350. Romantic Poets. (3 or 4) A review of the beginnings of Romanticism in Englh 
literature, followed by study of Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Keats, and Shell 
collateral reading in the prose of the period. 

353. The Nineteenth Century English Novel. (3 or 4) Representative major works 
Dickens, Eliot, Thackeray, Hardy, the Brontes, and others. 

354. Victorian Poetry. (3 or 4) A studv of Tennvson, Browning, Hopkins, a 
Arnold or another Victorian poet. 

360. Studies in Victorian Literature. (3 or 4) Selected topics, such as development f 
genres, major texts, and cultural influences. Readings in poetry, fiction, autobiogi- 
phv, and other prose. 



91 

2. Blake, Yeats, and Thomas. (3 or 4) Reading and critical analysis of the poetry of 
llf ike, Yeats, and Dylan Thomas; study of the plays of Yeats and his contemporaries 
11 the Irish Renaissance, especially Synge and Lady Gregory. 

4. Studies in Literary Criticism. (3 or 4) Consideration of certain figures and 
Hfhools of thought significant in the history of literary criticism. 

5. Twentieth Century British Fiction. (3 or 4) A study of Conrad, Lawrence, Joyce, 
rster, Woolf, and later English writers, with attention to their social and intellectual 
ckgrounds. 

7. Twentieth Century Poetry. (3 or 4) Selected American and British poets from 

00 to 1965. 

i 

''■8. Studies in Irish Literature. (3 or 4) Critical readings of the works of major Irish 
1 'iters within the context of the political, social, and literary history of Ireland. 

9. Modern Drama. (3 or 4) Modern drama from its late nineteenth century 
lalturalist beginnings to contemporary theatre. 

2. American Romanticism. (3 or 4) Writers of the mid-nineteenth century, includ- 
g Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, and Melville. 

1 4. Intellectual and Social Movements in American Literature to 1865. (3 or 4) 

1 ' lected topics such as Puritanism, the Enlightenment, Transcendentalism, and 
Jjbmanticism. 

'6. American Poetry from 1855 to 1900. (3 or 4) Readings from at least two of the 
llowing poets: Whitman, Dickinson, Melville. 

[|p8. Literature of the South. (3 or 4) The aesthetic, philosophical, and sociological 
r mensions of the best literature of the South, from the colonial to the contemporary 

;riod. Writers to include the regional humorists, Faulkner, Ransom, and Tennessee 

illiams. 

10. American Fiction from 1865 to 1915. (3 or 4) Such writers as Twain, James, 
owells, Crane, Dreiser, Wharton, and Cather. 

11. Studies in Black Literature. (3 or 4) Reading and critical analysis of selected 
:tion, poetry, drama, and other writing by representative black Americans. 

t $2. Modern American Fiction, 1915 to the Present. (3 or 4) To include such writers 
■ Lewis, Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Faulkner, Steinbeck, Wolfe, Wright, [Catherine 
nne Porter, Mailer, Bellow, Malamud, Flannery O'Connor, Baldwin, and Styron. 

36. Directed Reading (2-4) A tutorial in an area of study not otherwise provided by 
ie department; granted upon departmental approval of petition presented by a 
ualified student. 

38. Honors in English. (3 or 4) A conference course centering upon a special 
'ading requirement and a thesis requirement. For senior students wishing to gradu- 
iKe with "Honors in English." 

89. The Use of the Library in Literary Research. (2) Attention to materials, 
lethods, and bibliography for the study of literature. 



92 



390. The Structure of English. (3 or 4) An introduction to the principles ad 
techniques of modern linguistics applied to contemporary American English. 

391. Contemporary American Poetry: Roots and Branches. (3 or 4) Seked 
American poets of the second half of the twentieth century, and their precui'-rs. 

German 

Wilmer D. Sanders, Chairman 
Professors Ralph S. Fraser, James C. O'Flaherty 
Associate Professors Wilmer D. Sanders, Larry E. West, Timothy F. Sellnt 

A major in German requires thirty-seven credits beyond German 111, 112 id 
must include German 218 and should include 281 and 285. 

Highly qualified majors are invited by the department to apply for admission to it 
honors program in German. To be graduated with the designation "Honorin 
German," thev must complete a senior research project and pass a comprehend 
examination. For additional information members of the departmental facii' 
should be consulted. 

Attention is called to the exchange program with the Free University of Ben. 

Ill, 112. Elementary German. (4, 4) This course covers the principles of gramur 
and pronunciation and includes the reading of simple texts. Lab — one hour 

150. Man spricht Deutsch auch in Oesterreich. (4) Three weeks of intensive 1 
guage and cultural study in Vienna, Austria. Travel to Salzburg and Munich. OffA 
in January. P — One semester of German. 

152. Intermediate German. (4) The principles of grammar are reviewed; readingl 
selected prose and poetry. Lab — one hour. P — Three years of high school Germ! 

153. Intermediate German. (5) The principles of grammar are reviewed; reading! 
selected prose and poetry. Lab — one hour. P — German 111, 112. 

211, 212. Introduction to German Literature. (4,4) The object of this course isi 
acquaint the student with masterpieces of German literature. Parallel reading ni 
reports. P — German 152 or 153. 

216. Basic Conversation: Level One. (4) Intensive practice of speech patterns, d;iy 
sessions, language laboratory practice. Offered in January. P — German 1 1 1 or 1 12 w 
grade of C or better. 

217. Conversation and Phonetics. (4) A course in spoken German emphasizi 
facility of expression. Considerable attention is devoted to phonetics. P — Germ 
152, 153, or equivalent. 

218. Composition and Grammar Review. (4) A review of the fundamentals 
German grammar with intensive practice in translation and composition. Requir 
for majors. P — German 152 or 153 or equivalent. 

219. Advanced Composition. (4) A study of advanced grammar and compositk 
English texts translated into German in addition to free composition in Germa 
P — German 218 or equivalent. 






93 



■-" 



;. < 



10 [ 



, !0. German Civilization. (4) A survey of contemporary German culture, including a 
jdy of its historical development in broad outline. The course is conducted in 

ierman. P — German 217 or permission of instructor. 
i I 
,12. Nietzsche in Translation. (4) Intensive study of selections from Nietzsche's 
arks, with emphasis on his development as a writer and thinker. Offered hi January. 
—Sophomore, junior, or senior standing. 

$1. Weimar Germany. (3 or 4) Historical and literary examination of Weimar 
ermany, 1919—1933. Authors include Thomas and Heinrich Mann, Juenger, Hes- 
, Brecht, Kafka, Tucholsky, Fallada, and Stefan Zweig. German or history credit 
etermined at registration. 

49. Old High German and Middle High German Literature. (4) The study of major 

riters and works from these two areas; emphasizes major writings of the chivalric 

'eriod. P — German 211, 212, or equivalent. 

i 

j 50. Renaissance, Reformation, and Baroque German Literature. (4) A study of 

, lajor writers and works from the post-chivalric period to approximately 1700. 

— German 211, 212, or equivalent. 

Id !'53. Eighteenth Century German Literature. (4) A study of major writers and works 
, Lf the Enlightenment and Sturm und Drang. P — German 211, 212, or equivalent. 

63. German Literature of the Nineteenth Century I. (4) Poetry, prose, dramas, and 
ritical works from approximately 1 795 to 1 848. P — German 2 1 1 , 2 12, or equivalent. 

\ 64. German Literature of the Nineteenth Century II. (4) Readings from the 
leginnings of Poetic Realism to the advent of Naturalism. P — German 21 1, 212, or 
, quivalent. 

.'70. Individual Study. (3) Studies in literature not ordinarily read in other courses. 
j — German 211, 212, and permission of instructor. 

!81. Seminar: Twentieth Century Prose. (4) Intensive study of certain works by 
-Thomas Mann, Hesse, and Kafka, plus considerable outside reading. P — German 
L!ll, 212, or equivalent. 

185. Seminar in Goethe. (4) Faust, Part I studied in class. Parallel readings in other 
;,vorks by Goethe assigned. P — (ierman 211, 212, or equivalent. 

J87, 288. Honors in German. (3, 3) A conference course in German literature. A 
najor research paper is required. Designed for candidates for departmental honors. 




94 

History 

Richard L. Zuber, Chairman 

Professors Richard C. Barnett, Cyclone Covey, 

Balkrishna Govind Gokhale, J. Edwin Hendricks, Thomas E. Mullen, 

Percival Perry, David L. Smiley, Henry Smith Stroupe, Lowell R. Tillett, 

W. Buck Yearns, Richard L. Zuber 

Associate Professors James P. Barefield, Merrill G. Berthrong, David W. Hacli. 

James G. McDowell, Michael L. Sinclair, J. Howell Smith 

Assistant Professor Alan J. Williams 

Lecturer Negley Boyd Harte (London) 

Instructor Christopher D. Cribaro 

Director of Minority Affairs Larry L. Palmer 

The major in history consists of a minimum of thirty-six credits and must incite 
History 310, from six to eight credits in European history, three or tour credits^ 
non-Western history, and from six to eight credits in American history. One of te 
American history courses must be 151, 152, or 153. 

Highly qualified majors should apply for admission to the honors program \ 
history. To be graduated with the designation "Honors in History," the student nut 
complete satisfactorily History 287 and 288. For additional information members' 
the departmental faculty should be consulted. 

Students contemplating graduate study should take historiography and shot 
acquire a reading knowledge of one modern foreign language (preferably Frenc 
German, or Russian) for the M.A. degree and two for the Ph.D. degree. 

101. The Rise of the West. (4) A survey of ancient, medieval, and early mode 
history to 1700. 

102. Europe and the World in the Modern Era. (4) A survey of modern Europe fro 
1700 to the present. 

131. European Historical Biography. (2) Study of biographies of several men ai 
women who have influenced the history and civilization of Europe. 

151, 152. The United States. (4, 4) Political, social, economic, and intellectual aspect 
151, before 1865; 152, after 1865. Students who take History 153 may not take eith< 
of these courses for credit. 

153. The United States. (4) A topical survey combining 151 and 152. Not open I 
students who take either 151 or 152. 

160. Freud. (4) An investigation of Freud's basic ideas in the context of his tim 
Books to be read include The Interpretation of Dreams, Civilization and Its Discontents, an 
Jones' biography in the 4'rilling abridgement. 

162. From the Forest of Wake to the Red Hills of Forsyth: The History of Wak 
Forest University. (4) A survey of the history of Wake Forest from its beginning. 4 
include reading assignments, lectures, and talks from those who remember life on tf 
old campus, a look at the history project now in progress, and a brief visit to the Tow 
of Wake Forest. Offered in January. 



95 
i 

13. Russian History and Culture from the Source. (4) A study tour of historic sites 
id cultural centers of the Soviet Union. Offered in January. 

i4. The American People and China. (4) A topical study of the images and attitudes 

Americans toward China. All students read John K. Fairbank's The United States and 

una and A. T. Steel's The American People and China, after which they select indi- 

'dual topics on which to present oral reports. Additional readings stress conflicting 

,,, [iterpretations of major issues in Sino-American relations. 

)5. Contemporary Conflict. (4) A study of the background of four conflicts to be 
udied as selected by the class members. 

56. Era of Individualism, 1954—1966 (4) An intensive studv of the period 1954— 
J66, during which privileged, prosperous Americans shared in seeking civil and 
ersonal rights for the freshly rediscovered deprived minorities. A nostalgic exami- 
iation of the time of optimism between McCarthvism and the rise of the Nixonian 
Silent Majority," when there was hope that a society could provide both equal 

I pportunity to all its citizens and special rewards for the citizens who excelled 
idividuallv. Much responsible student participation is expected, with the possibility 
fan examination. No limit, but size influences type of instruction. Pass/Fail. Usually 

^ ffered in January. 

! 11. Colloquium. (1—4). 

i 
15, 216. The Ancient World. (4, 3 or 4) Critical focus on the Creeks in the fall and 

Romans in the spring, but in global context of paleolithic to medieval; psychological/ 

'ihilosophical emphasis. 

21. The Middle Ages. (4) A survey of European history, 400—1300, stressing social 
If nd cultural developments. 

!22. The Renaissance and Reformation. (4) Europe from 1300 to 1600. Social, 
1 ultural, and intellectual developments stressed. Students may take either segment of 
he course separately. 

1 123. The Renaissance. (2) (See 222 for description.) 

!24. The Reformation. (2) (See 222 for description.) 

1260. History of London. (4) Topographical, social, economic, and political history 
)f London from the earliest times. Lectures, student papers and reports, museum 
visits and lectures, and on-site inspections. Offered in London. 

2262. The Golden Age of Burgundy. (2) Burgundian society, culture, and govern- 

nent in the reigns of Philip the Bold, John the Fearless, Philip the Good, and Charles 

fche Rash, 1384-1477. Offered in Dijon. 
li, 

231. Weimar Germany. (3 or 4) Historical and literary examination of Weimar 

Germay, 1919-1933. Authors include Thomas and Heinrich Mann, Juenger, 
'Hesse, Brecht, Kafka, Tucholskv, Fallada, and Stefan Zweig. German or history 
credit determined at registration. 

232. European Historical Novels. (2) Studv of the accuracy and value, from the 
standpoint of the historian, of a selection of historical novels. 



96 

238. Twentieth Century Europe. (4) Advent of modernism, World Wars I audi, 
totalitarianism, the Cold War, and Europe in the post-European era. 

240. Afro- American History. (4) The role of Afro- Americans in the development 
the United States, with particular attention to African heritage, forced migratifl 
Americanization, and influence. 

264. Economic History of the United States. (3) The economic development of e 
United States from colonial beginnings to the present. 

265. American Diplomatic History. (4) An introduction to the history of ' Americn 
diplomacy since 1776, emphasizing the effects of public opinion on fundamerl 
policies. 

270. Oral History. (4) Intensive study of select events of recent Piedmont Nol 
Carolina history, preparation of sets of questions for interviews, interviews w i 
participants in those events, and the evaluation of these interviews as his tor il 
evidence. 

271. Colonial Latin America, 1492—1825. (4) Cultural configurational approach 

287, 288. Honors in History. (4,4) First semester, seminar on problems of historic! 

synthesis and interpretation; second semester, writing of a major paper and examirl 
tion on a special field. 

310. Seminar. (4) Offered by members of the faculty on topics of their choice, 
paper is required. 

311, 312. Social and Intellectual History of Modern Europe. (4, 4) Intellectn 
trends in Western European civilization. Fall, seventeenth and eighteenth centuric 
spring, nineteenth and twentieth centuries. 

316. France and England in the Twelfth and Thirteenth Centuries. (4) The stru 
ture of society, the nature of law, church/state relations, and intellectual develo 
ments. P — History 221 or permission of instructor. 

319, 320. Germany. (4, 4) Fall, origins of the German nation and the rise of Prussia 
a context of particularism; spring, from World War I to divided Germany. 

321, 322. France. (4, 4) Fall, from prehistoric Gaul to 1788, with particular emphas 
on the sixteenth, seventeenth, and eighteenth centuries; spring, 1788 to the present 

323, 324. England. (4, 4) A political and social survey, with some attention t 
Continental movements. Fall, to 1603; spring, 1603 to present. 

325. Tudor and Early Stuart England. (4) A constitutional and social study 
England from 1485 to 1641. 

329, 330. Modern England. (4, 4) Political, social, economic, and cultural history o 
England since 1714. Fall, to 1815; spring, since 1815. 

331, 332. Russia (4, 4) Primarily political, with some attention to cultural and socki 
developments. Fall, the Russian Empire; spring, the Soviet Union. 

333. European Diplomacy, 1848—1914. (4) The diplomacy of the great powers, with 
some attention given to the role of publicity in international affairs. Topics includt 






97 

] 

e unification of Italy and of Germany, the Bismarckian system, and the coming of 
odd War I. 

1 Hi. Southeast Asia from 1511 to the Present. (4) A survey of the history and culture 
Southeast Asia under Western colonial systems, with special reference to econom- 
social, and cultural developments, the rise of nationalism, and the emergence of 

il I'w nation-states. 

12. The Middle East from Suleiman the Magnificent to the Present. (4) Major 
: j ibjects covered are the rise and fall of the Ottoman Empire, the Arabs and Persians 
t ; ider Ottoman hegemony, the rise of Arab nationalism, and the emergence of the 

odern Arab states and their roles in the post-World War II era. 

43. Imperial China. (4) Development of traditional institutions in Chinese society to 
o44; attention to social, cultural, and political factors, emphasizing continuity and 
•sistance to change. 

14. Modern China. (4) 4 he Manchu Dynasty and its response to the Western 
lallenge, the 1911 Revolution, the warlord era and the rise of the Communists, 
hinese Communist society, and the Cultural Revolution. 

45, 346. History and Civilization of South Asia. (4, 4) An introduction to the history 
id civilization of South Asia. Emphasis on historical developments in the social, 
:onomic, and cultural life of the area. 

47. India in Western Literatures. (4) A one-semester historical survey of images of 
ndia in Western literatures, with special reference to religious and philosophical 
leas, art, polity, society, and culture. 

49, 350, East Asia. (4, 4) An introduction to the social, cultural, and political 
L evelopment of China, Japan, and Korea. Fall, to 1600; spring, since 1600. 

51, 352. American Society and Thought. (4, 4) A non-political topical survey of 
.merican culture and lifestyles. Topics include religion, science, education, architec- 
,ire, and immigration. 

53. Colonial English America, 1582—1774. (4) Determinative episodes, figures, 
,., llegiances, apperceptions, and results of the period, organicallv considered. 

54. Revolutionary and Early National America, 1763-1815. (4) The American 
devolution, its causes and effects, the Confederation, the Constitution, and the new 
ation. 

55. The Westward Movement. (4) The role of the frontier in United States history, 
763-1890. 

56. Jacksonian America, 1815—1850. (4) The United States in the age of Jackson, 
>lay, Calhoun, and Webster. A biographical approach. 

'57. The Civil War and Reconstruction. (4) The political and military events of the 
^ar and the economic, social, and political readjustments which followed. 

'58. The United States from Reconstruction to World War I. (4) National progress 
nd problems during an era of rapid industrialization. 



98 



359. The United States from Versailles to Pearl Harbor. (4) The transitioiol 
America from World War I to 1941, with special emphasis on the Roaring Tvveies 
and the New Deal. 

360. The United States since Pearl Harbor. (4) Trends and changes in the na* 
from World War II through the Kennedy era to the present. 

362. American Constitutional History. (4) Origins of the Constitution, the cn- 
troversies invoking the nature of the Union, and constitutional readjustments 
meet the new American industrialism. 

363, 364. The South. (4, 4) Geography, population elements, basic institutions, ui 
selected events. 

365. Women in American History. (4) A survey of the roles and activities of woifc 
in America, with emphasis upon selected individuals. 

366. Studies in Historic Preservation. (4) An analysis of history museums id 
agencies and of the techniques of preserving and interpreting history throfh 
artifacts, restorations, and reconstructions. P — Permission of instructor. 

367. 368. North Carolina. (4, 4) Selected phases of the development of N<lh 
Carolina from the colonial beginnings to the present. Fall, to 1789; spring, six 
1789. 

372. Africa since 1800. (4) A survey concentrating primarily on the major thces 
and problems in African history from 1800 to the present. 

391, 392. Historiography. (4, 3) The principal historians and their writings fun 
ancient times to the present. Fall, European historiography; spring, American his r- 
iographv. 

398. Individual Study. (4) A project in an area of study not otherwise available in it 
department; permitted upon departmental approval of petition presented ha 
qualified student. 

399. Directed Reading. (1-4). 



Humanities 

N. Rick Heatley, Coordinator 

165. Black African Literature. (4) A general introductory course. Study ol K 
origins and development of black African literature. Analysis of representative wcfl 
of poetry, fiction, and essays. Readings and classes in English; originals in French <» 
available for majors. Discussions, occasional lectures, reports, and papers. Offenm 
January. 

213. Studies in European Literature. (4) A study of approximately twelve work: 
translation, taken from European literature. Satisfies a Division I requirement. 

214. Contemporary Fiction. (4) A study of contemporary European and L.n 
American fiction in translation. Satisfies a Division I requirement. 



,!7i 



99 

■"- 

;,5. Germanic and Slavic Literature. (4) A study of approximately twelve works in 
l a nslation taken from Germanic and Slavic literatures. Satisfies a Division I require- 
i nt. 

|J$. Romance Literature. (4) A study of approximately twelve works in translation 
I en from Romance literatures. Offered in alternate years. Satisfies a Division I l e- 
i irement. 

',7. European Drama. (4) A study of selected works in translation, from the seven- 
i nth to the twentieth centuries, by major Continental dramatists. Satisfies a Division 
equirement. 

: 5. Nineteenth Century Romanticism: Philosophy and Art. (4) A study of the 
mantic motif as expressed in the philosophy and ait of Europe and the United 
ites in the nineteenth century. 

7. Issues in Nineteenth Century America. (4) An interdisciplinary study of 
leteenth century American culture, including art, literature, music, and philoso- 
v, as it reflects and gives insight into some issues crucial to the developing nation. 

0. Discovering the Visual and Verbal Modes of the Twentieth Century. (4) An 

ploration of the ideas, values, and feelings found in the art and literature of 

oresentative twentieth centurv figures: Kandinskv, Stevens, Picasso, Kafka, Leger, 

ckett, Klee, Ionesco, Pollock, Faulkner, Chagall, Barth, and others. 
y 
0. What the Arts Have Been Saying since 1800. (4) An experiment in developing 

erpretive judgment and insight regarding music, painting, and literature as articu- 

Hons of the frontier consciousness of the period. 

2. The Classical and Surreal Tradition. (4) A venture to define and differentiate 
ssical and surreal modes of perception throughout history, their paradoxical 

nationship to each other and to complementary styles, considered in philosophy, 
usic, literature, and painting. 

8. An Editor Looks at the Rights of American Citizens, 1965— Present. (4) Current 

velopments in the field of constitutional rights as seen by a newspaper editor. 

3. France in the Thirties: Literature and Social Consciousness. (4) A study in 

iglish of Malraux, Giraudoux, Celine, Bernanos, and St. Exuperv. 

■14. French Literature in the Mid-Twentieth Century. (4) A study of the literature of 
e forties and fifties and its evolution from "commitment" to "disengagement." 
ithors include Sartre, Camus, Beckett, Robbe-Grillet, Genet, and Duras. 

5. The French Theatre between 1920 and 1960: Theory and Practice. (4) Study of 
>rks by Giraudoux, Cocteau, Anouilh, Sartre, Camus, Beckett, Ionesco, and Genet. 

8. Evolution of Autobiography as a Literary Form. (4) A study of autobiography 
a form of fiction. Reading of Rousseau's Confessions and selected autobiographies 

, twentieth century French authors. Taught in English. 

9. The Literary Works of Jean-Paul Sartre. (4) A critical study of Sartre's evolution 
reflected in his novels and plays from Nausea to The Prisoners of Altona. 

0. Albert Camus. (3) A critical studv of Camus' evolution as a writer. 



100 

Interdisciplinary Honors 

Paul M. Gross Jr., Coordinator 

A series of seminar courses of an interdisciplinary nature are open to quali 
students in the College. Students interested in admission to any one of these se 
nars, supervised by the Committee on Honors, should consult the coordinator 
member of the committee. 

Students who choose to participate in as many as four interdisciplinary semiirs 
and who have a superior record may elect Honors 28 1 , directed study culminatiiiin 
an honors paper and an oral examination. Those whose work has been superiofl 
this course and who have achieved an overall grade point average of at least 3.0 ilill 
college work may be graduated with the distinction "Honors in the Arts and Scjti- 
ces." Students who choose to be candidates for departmental honors may not alsoe 
candidates for "Honors in the Arts and Sciences." 

Able students are normally encouraged to choose a departmental honors progim 
rather than "Honors in the Arts and Sciences." As a result, most students ele< to 
participate in only one or two interdisciplinary seminars in which they are particufl 
ly interested. The faculty participants for these seminars represent diverse acade k 
disciplines. 

131, 132. Approaches to Human Experience I. (4, 4) An inquiry into the nature M 
interrelationships of several approaches to man's experience, represented by I 
work of three such minds as Leonardo da Vinci, Dante, Newton, Gandhi, Conf ucij, 
Dostoevsky, Descartes, Goya, Mozart, Jefferson, and Bohr. Seminar discussion ba i cl 
on primary and secondary sources, including musical works and paintings. Writ in 
reports and a term paper required. Offered in alternate years. 

133, 134. Approaches to Human Experience II. (4, 4) A parallel course to Hon s 
131, 132, concentrating on the work of a different set of figures such as Bui w 
Galileo, Keynes, Pascal, Camus, Picasso, Ibsen, Tagore, Sophocles, and Bach. Offiu 
in alternate years. 

*233. Darwinism and the Modern World. (4) A study of the Darwinian theonB" 
evolution and the impact of evolution and the impact of evolutionary thought I 
fields such as economics, politics, psychology, literature and the other arts, I 
philosophy. 

*235. The Ideal Society. (4) Man's effort to establish or imagine the ideal communl 
state, or society; principles of political and social organization; changing goals <l 
values. 

*237. The Scientific Outlook. (4) An exploration of the origins and developmen 
the scientific method and some of its contemporary applications in the natural ; 
social sciences and the humanities. 



*One or more offered each year at the discretion of the Committee on Honoi 



101 



* 8. Romanticism. (4) Romanticism as a recurrent characteristic of mind and art and 
a specific historical movement in Europe and America in the late eighteenth and 
neteenth centuries. Emphasis on primary materials in philosophy, literature, 
i usic, and painting. 

Tp59. Man and the Irrational. (4) The phenomenon of the irrational, with emphasis on 
11 j 1 twentieth century manifestations but with attention also to its presence in other 
nturies and cultures. Philosophy, religion, literature, psychology, politics, and the 
fits are explored. 

ill 

J U. The Tragic View. (4) The theory of tragedy in ancient and modern times; the 

pression of the tragic in literature, art, music, theatre, and film. 

Kp2. The Comic View. (4) The theory of comedy in ancient and modern times; the 
Impression of the comic spirit in literature, art, music, theatre, and film. 

' 14. Man and the Structure of the Universe. (4) An investigation of various concep- 
1 Sns of the universe and their implications for man. Study not necessarily limited to 
"e cosmologies of Ptolemy, Copernicus, and their modern successors, but may also 
'elude theories such as the Babylonian, Mayan, and Taoist. 

.... 
: 16. Man and the Environment. (4) An interdisciplinary examination of man and 

iciety in relation to the environment. 

: 17. The Mythic View. (4) The nature of myth through creation and hero myths; the 
>es to which myths have been put in different historical periods; various modern 
cplanations of myth (literary, religious, anthropological, psychoanalytic, social, and 

s.storical). 



ne or more offered each year at the discretion of the Committee on Honors 




102 

281. Directed Study. (4) Readings on an interdisciplinary topic approved b\ I 
Committee on Honors; preparation of a major research or interpretive paper I), I 
on these readings, under the direction of a faculty member; an oral examination 
the topic, administered by the faculty supervisor and the Committee on Horn 
Eligible students who wish to take this course must submit a written request topt 
Committee on Honors by the end of the junior year. Not open to candidates')! 
departmental honors. 

Mathematics 

Ivey C. Gentry, Chairman 
Professors John V. Baxley, Ivey C. Gentry, Fredric T. Howard, 

John W. Sawyer, Ben M. Seelbinder, Marcellus E. Waddill 

Associate Professors Richard D. Carmichael, Elmer K. Hayashi, 

James Kuzmanovich, J. Gaylord May, W. Graham May 

Assistant Professor Ellen E. Kirkman 

Instructors Nirmal Devi, Stephen P. Richters, Margaret B. Seelbinder 

A major in mathematics requires forty credits. A student must include courses 1 
112,1 13, 121,221, one of the courses 311,317, 352, 357, and at least two additiol 
300-level courses. A prospective teacher in the education block may take 231 in liei I 
the course from 311,317, 352, or 357. Lower division students are urged to consul 
member of the departmental faculty before enrolling in courses other than th<e 
satisfying Division II requirements. 

A regularly scheduled activity in mathematics is an informal seminar of stude 
and faculty on topics not discussed in regular courses (for example, finite differenc 
game theory, Monte Carlo method, divergent series). 

The department, along with the Departments of Economics and Business a 
Accountancy, offers joint majors. The Departments of Mathematics and Econoni 
offer a joint major leading to a Bachelor of Science degree in mathematical ecot 
mics. This interdisciplinary program affords the student an opportunity to ap] 
mathematical methods to the development of economic theory, models, and quai 
tative analysis. The major consists of the following course requirements: Mathemai 5 
111, 112, 113, 121, 251; Economics 151, 152, 201, 202, 203; a joint seminar] 
mathematical economics; and three additional courses chosen with the approval 
the program advisers. Recommended courses are Mathematics 253, 348, 353, 3." 
358, and Economics 25 1 , 242, 287, 288. Students electing the joint major must recei 
permission from both the Department of Economics and the Department of Matl 
matics. 

The Department of Mathematics offers a joint major leading to a Bachelor f 
Science degree in mathematics-biology. This interdisciplinary program affords t : 
student an opportunity to applv mathematical methods to the development ail 
analysis of biological systems. The major consists of the following course requii 
ments: Mathematics 112, 155, 157, or 357; Biology! 50, 151, 152; and seven additic 
al courses (at least three in each department) chosen with the approval of tl 
program advisers. Recommended courses in mathematics are 121, 253, 256, 34 
353, 355, 357. Students electing the joint major must receive permission from t 
Department of Mathematics. 



103 

The departments of Mathematics and Business and Accountancy offer a joint 
n jijor leading to a Bachelor of Science degree in mathematics-business. This interdis- 
lii i ilinary program prepares students for careers in business, with a strong back- 
Ill mound in mathematics. The major consists of the following course requirements: 
Mathematics 111, 112, 155, 157, 256, or 355; Accounting 111, 112; Business 211, 
t 1, 231; either Business 201 or Mathematics 357; either Business 202 or Mathema- 
s 253; and two additional courses chosen from Accounting 252, 278; Business 28 1 ; 
athematics 121, 248, 353, 381; or specially designed January courses. Economics 
1, 152 is strongly recommended. Students electing the joint major must receive 
rmission from both the Department of Business and Accountancy and the Depart- 
ent of Mathematics. 

Highly qualified majors are invited by the department to apply for admission to the 
mors program in mathematics or in the joint majors. To be graduated with the 
■signation "Honors in Mathematics," "Honors in Mathematics-Biology, "Honors 
Mathematics-Business," or "Honors in Mathematical Economics," they must com- 
ete satisfactorily a senior research paper and pass a comprehensive oral or written 
I :amination. For additional information members of the departmental faculty 
i ould be consulted. 

)5. Pre-Calculus Mathematics. (2, 3, or 4) Selected topics deal with the structure of 
amber systems and the elementary functions. Not to be counted toward the major in 
athematics. 

dl, 112, 113. Calculus with Analytic Geometry I, II, III. (5, 5 or 4, 4) Differential 
rid integral calculus and basic concepts of analytic geometry; multivariable calculus, 
o student allowed credit for both 1 16 and 111. Lab — two hours for 111, 112. 

15. Finite Mathematics. (5 or 4) Probability and statistics, matrices, linear program- 
ing, Markov chains, and theory of games. Lab — two hours. 

kj 

,16. Essential Calculus. (5 or 4) A one-semester course in differential and integral 
iilculus with application to business and the social sciences. No student allowed credit 
H )r both 1 16 and 1 1 1. A student who might take additional calculus should not take 
[athematics 116. Lab) — two hours. 

21. Linear Algebra. (4) Vectors and vector spaces, linear transformations and 
latrices, linear groups, and determinants. 

B 

]55. Introduction to FORTRAN Programming. (4) Lecture and laboratory. A study 
f FORTRAN language. Students use computer terminals as well as card input. 

56. Statistical Concepts. (4) An introductory course for the student of statistics who 
as a limited mathematical background. Includes descriptive techniques, frequency 
istributions, statistical inference, regression, and correlation. Emphasis is placed on 
ow statistics can be used in society. No student allowed credit for both 156 and 157. 

Offered in January. 

57. Elementary Probability and Statistics. (5 or 4) Probability and distribution 
unctions, means and variances, and sampling distributions. Lai) — two hours. No 
tudent allowed credit for both 156 and 157. 



104 



221. Modern Algebra I. (4) An introduction to modern abstract algebra througlhr 
study of groups, rings, integral domain, and fields. P — Mathematics 121. 

231. Euclidean Geometry. (4) Postulates, definitions, theorems, and model ol 
Euclidean geometry. 

251. Ordinary Differential Equations. (4 or 3) Linear equations with consii 
coefficients, linear equations with variable coefficients, and existence and unique ss 
theorems for first order equations. P — Mathematics 1 12. 

253. Operations Research. (4) Mathematical models and optimization techniqjs. 
Studies in allocation, simulation, queuing, scheduling, and network analysis. — 
Mathematics 111, 1 15, or equivalent. 

256. COBOL Programming. (4) Lecture and laboratory. A study of the element! 
COBOL language. P — Mathematics 155. I 

305S, 306S. Elementary Analysis for Teachers I, II. (4, 4) Concepts from di Hernial 
and integral calculus for Advanced Placement teachers. All topics in the Calculus»B 
and BC courses are covered. Offered in the summer. 

311, 312. Advanced Calculus I, II. (4, 4 or 3) Limits and continuity in metric spa:s, 
differentiation and Riemann-Stieltjes integration, sequences and series, uniiuii 
convergence, power series and Fourier series, partial differentiation and f unctioi of 
n real variables, implicit and inverse function theorem. P — Mathematics 1 13. 

317. Complex Analysis I. (4) Analvtic functions, Cauchy's theorem and its coie- 
quences, power series, and residue calculus. P — Mathematics 113. 

322. Modern Algebra II. (4 or 3) A continuation of modern abstract algebra thro jh 
the study of additional properties of group and fields and a thorough treatment)! 
vector spaces. P — Mathematics 221. 

323, 324. Matrix Theory I, II. (4, 4 or 3) Basic concepts and theorems concenlg 
matrices and real number functions defined on preferred sets of matrices. — 
Mathematics 121. 

332. Non-Euclidean Geometry. (4 or 3) Postulates, definitions, theorems, and n d- 
els of Lobachevskian and Riemannian geometry. 

345, 346. Elementary Theory of Numbers I, II. (4, 4 or 3) Properties of integ'S 
congruences, arithmetic functions, primitive roots, sums of squares, magic squa:s. 
applications to elementary mathematics, quadratic residues, arithmetic theor)0f 
continued fractions. 






348. Combinatorial Analysis. (4 or 3) Enumeration techniques, including generaiig 
functions, recurrence formulas, the principle of inclusion and exclusion, and Poll's 
theorem. 

351. Applied Analysis. (4) Topics which have proven useful in the physical scierns. 
including vector analvsis and complex analvsis. 



It "»' 



, 105 

'2. Partial Differential Equations. (4) The separation of variables techniques for 
; solution of the wave, heat, Laplace, and other partial differential equations, with 

[fe related study of the Fourier transform and the expansion of functions in Fourier, 
gendre, and Bessel series. 

3. Mathematical Models. (4) Development and application of probabilistic and 
terministic models. Emphasis given to constructing models which represent sys- 
tns in the social, behavioral, and management sciences. P — Mathematics 253. 

i5. Numerical Analysis. (4) A computer-oriented study of analytical methods in 
'athematics. Lecture and laboratory. P — Mathematics 112 and 155. 

y 

>7, 358. Mathematical Statistics I, II. (4, 4 or 3) Probability distributions, mathema- 
:al expectation, sampling distributions, estimation and testing of hypotheses, re- 
cession, correlation, and analysis of variance. P — Mathematics 113. 

il. Selected Topics. (2, 3 or 4) Topics in mathematics which are not considered in 
gular courses or which continue study begun in regular courses. Content varies. 

31. Individual Study. (2, 3 or 4) A choice of study in an area of individual interest 
irected by a faculty adviser. 

Military Science 

Lieutenant Colonel Anderson H. Walters, Professor 

Captain Robert H. Lewis, Captain Jasper L. McBride, 

Major William D. Waller, Captain David E. Walters, 

Captain John D. Wray, Assistant Professors 

Sergeant Major Ezequiel B. Evaro, Staff Sergeant Larry V. Strickland 

Sergeant First Class Curtis Torry 



h 10. ROTC and the Military Establishment. ( 1 ) Introduction to the ROTC program 
nd the military establishment; practical exercises in various skill modules, including 
irienteering, mountaineering, and marksmanship. Usually offered in January. 

11. Military Fundamentals. (Military History). (2) 

12. Military Fundamentals. (Mountaineering). (2) 

113. Military Fundamentals. (Tactical Considerations of Modern Battle). (2) 

114. Military Fundamentals. (Leadership). (2) 

115. Military Fundamentals. (Marksmanship). (2) 

116. Military Fundamentals. (Orienteering). (2) 

'Military Fundamentals 111-116 include ROTC and national defense, leadership 
styles, theoretical orientation in a contemporary environment, basic and intermedi- 
ate military skills. Enrichment subject required.* (Skill module areas of concentration 
are indicated in parentheses.) Students may receive credit for no more than four 
military fundamental courses. 



'This subject, either elective or required, furthers the professional qualifications of the student as a 
prospective officer in the U.S. Army. This does not require additional hours above and beyond the normal 
semester course requirements. In cases where a student is pursuing a discipline which is narrowly restricted 
with few electives, the Professor of Military Science can resolve any conflict in favor of the student's degree 
requirements. 



106 



201. Outdoor Exploration. (2) Introduction to various outdoor recreational surval 
skills. The content varies but includes such outdoor experiences as selecting id 
setting up a camp site, rock climbing, rappelling, back packing, canoeing, orienkr- 
ing, downhill and cross country skiing, spelunking, cross country bicycling, id 
drown proofing. (Offered jointly with the Department of Physical Education.) 

202S. Combined Military Fundamentals. (4) History and organization of the Uni'd 
States Army. Basic and intermediate military skills to include leadership styles ni 
techniques, land navigation, dismounted drill, mountaineering, and marksmanshl 
P — Permission of instructor. Offered in (he summer. 

211, 212. First Year Advanced. (2, 2) Small unit tactics, communications and militn 
orienteering, military formations, and advanced military skills. Lab — \V-> hours jr 
week. P — Credit for basic course. Enrichment subject required.* 

251, 252. Second Year Advanced. (2, 2) Planning and supervision of leadersrl 

laboratory program, active duty orientation, military administration, law, and lot>- 
tics. Enrichment subject required.* Lab — VA hours per week. P — Military Sciern 
211 and 212. 

Music 

John V. Mochnick, Acting Chairman 
Assistant Professors Christopher Giles, Annette LeSiege, David B. Levy, 

John V. Mochnick 

Director of Bands R. Davidson Burgess 

Instructors Louis Goldstein, Lucille S. Harris, Donna Mayer-Martin 

Teresa Radomski 

A major in music requires forty-eight credits. This includes a basic curriculum < 
thirty-six credits (Music Theory 171, 172, 173, and 174, sixteen credits; Mus 
Historv 181, 182, six credits; ten credits of applied music, and four credits c 
ensemble) plus twelve additional credits of elective courses in music. In addition t 
the course work, music majors are required to present a senior recital or project 

Students anticipating a major in music are urged to begin their studies during th 
freshman year and are required to audition during the second semester of thei 
sophomore year before being officially admitted to the program. 

Highlv qualified majors mav be invited to applv for admission to the honor 
program in music. To be graduated with the designation "Honors in Music," 
candidate must complete one of the following requirements: (1) an honors-leve 
research paper, (2) an original composition, or (3) an analytical lecture related t< 
music performed bv the candidate in a public recital. 

Any student interested in majoring in music should consult the chairman of th< 
department as soon as possible after entering the University. 



*Th is subject, either elective or required, furthers the professional qualifications of the student as a prospectn ' 
officer in the i'.S. A rmy. This does not require additional hours above and beyond the normal semester cows, 
requirements. In cases where a student is pursuing a discipline which is narrowly restricted with few elective^ 
the Professor of Militai-y Science can resolve any conflict in favor of the student's degree requirements 



107 



Music Theory 



;)1. Introduction to the Language of Music. (3, 4) Basic theoretical concepts and 
' imsical terminology. Survey of musical styles, composers, and selected works from 
% Lite Middle Ages through the twentieth century. For students not majoring in music. 



02. Language of Music I. (3, 4) Survey of musical styles, composers, and selected 

'orks from the Middle Ages through the twentieth century. For students who can 

' a ad music. Not open to music majors. P — Permission of instructor. 

\ 
05. Music Theory for Non-Majors (4) A study and application of music fundamen- 

ilsand music theory for the non-music major. A combination of theoretical skills for 
nalysis and stylistic composition (key signatures, scales, intervals, triads, seventh 
hords) and musical skills (sight singing, ear training, keyboard harmony). P — 101 or 
02 or permission of instructor. 
f 
71. Music Theory I. (4) Music Fundamentals: key signatures, scales, modes, inter- 

als, triads, elements of music. Ear training, sight singing, and rhythm skills. (A 
•ne-hour piano class is required of students having no keyboard background.) 



f-> I? 



t :'J 



72. Music Theory II. (4) Seventh chords, beginning part-writing, basic counter- 
joint, ear training, sight singing, rhythm skills, keyboard harmony. P — Music 171. 

.73. Music Theory III. (4) Altered chords, continuation of part-writing, eighteenth 
ind nineteenth century forms, ear training, sight singing, rhythm skills, keyboard 
tarmony. P — Music 172. 

174. Music Theory IV. (4) Expanded harmonic system of Impressionism and the 
wentieth century. New concepts of style and form. Ear training, sight singing, 

rhythm skills, keyboard harmony. P — Music 173. 
: ( 
1 202. Language of Music II. (3, 4) An in-depth study of selected major works from the 

Middle Ages through the twentieth century. Not open to music majors. P — Music 101 
Lor 102 or permission of instructor. 

270. Sixteenth Century Counterpoint. (2) Analysis of sixteenth century contrapuntal 
music, in particular that of Palestrina. Examination of Renaissance writings on 
counterpoint. Composition of canon and motet. Offered in alternate years. P — Music 
174. 

271. Eighteenth Century Counterpoint. (2) Analysis of eighteenth century contra- 
puntal styles, with concentration on the Well-Tempered Clavier and Art <>/ the Fugue of 
J. S. Bach. Composition of invention, canon, and fugue. Offered iti alternate years. 
P— Music 174. 

272. Analysis Seminar. (2) A study of analytical writings of theorists and composers 
and the development of practical skills as they can be used in research and perform- 
ance preparation. Offered in alternate years. P — Music 174. 

273. Composition. ( 1 or 2) Individual instruction in the craft of musical composition. 
May be repeated for credit. P — Permission of instructor. 



108 



275. History of Theory. (2) A study of theoretical writing on musical acousi's, 
instruments, and notation from classical Greece to the present. Offered in alter.U 
years. P — Music 174. 

276. Current Practices. (2) A survey of twentieth century compositional techniqis. 
notation, and performance problems involving the study of music and theoret'al 
writings associated with major trends from 1900 to the present. Offered in altertte 
years. P — Music 174. 

! 

Music History 

124. Chamber Music. (2) Study of the history and repertoire of chamber music frn 
the late Baroque to the twentieth century. Classroom work combined with act il 
rehearsal and performance of chamber repertoire. May be repeated for creit. 
P — Audition and permission of instructor. 

181. Music History I. (3) History of music from the Greeks to 1750. 

I 

182. Music History II. (3) History of music from 1750 to the present. P — Music 18 

201. Music History for Non-Majors. (3, 4) An historical survey of stylistic tren 
major composers, and genera. P — Music 101 or 102 or permission of instructoi 

a. Middle Ages c. Baroque e. Romantic 

b. Renaissance d. Classical f. Contemporary 

203. History of Jazz. (2) A survey of American jazz from its origin to the presei'. 
Open to majors and non-majors. P — Music 101 or 102 or permission of instructs 

204. Survey of Choral Music. (2) An historical overview of important genera (i. ; , 
anthem, cantata, motet, mass, oratorio) with an emphasis on church music aw 
liturgical function. Open to majors and non-majors. P — Music 101 or 102 or perm ; 
sion of instructor. 

205. Survey of Orchestral Music. (2) An historical overview of important orchesti 
repertoire (i.e., symphony, concerto, overture, symphonic poem). Open to majo 
and non-majors. P — Music 101 or 102 or permission of instructor. 

206. Survey of Opera. (2) A study of the development of opera from 1600 to tt 
present. Selected operas by European and American composers will be examined 
class via record, score, and film. Class will attend opera performances when possibl 
Open to majors and non-majors. P— Music 101 or 102 or permission of instructo 

212. Music in the Church. (2) Function of the church musician and the relationsh 
of his or her work to the church program. P — Music 174, 182. 

215. Philosophy of Music. (2) A survey of philosophical writings about musi 
Musical aesthetics; social, religious, and political concerns. P — Music 174, 182. 

219. Seminar in Medieval Music. (3) A study of medieval music, its philosoph' 
theory (including notational practices), and performance practices. Areas receivin 
special emphasis are Gregorian chant repertoire, the Notre Dame School, A\ 
Antiqua, and Ars Nova. P — Music 174, 182 or permission of instructor. 



109 



10. Seminar in Renaissance Music. (3) A study of music from 1400 to 1600, its 
v , eory (including notational practices), and performance practices. The study begins 
th the Burgundian School, with special areas of emphasis the Netherlands compos- 
sand the late Renaissance madrigal. P — Music 174, 182 or permission of instructor. 
lif p 
lit L>1. Seminar in Baroque Music. (3) Musical activity from about 1600 to Bach and 

, L andel. Special emphasis on the development of national styles and their resolutions 
ward the end of the era. P — Music 174, 182 or permission of instructor. 

12. Seminar in Eighteenth Century Music. (3) Musical developments from the sons 
: Bach through the Viennese Classicism of Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven. P — 
ifusic 174, 182 or permission of instructor. 

s j23. Seminar in Nineteenth Century Music. (3) Music from the latter part of 
i seethoven's career through Wagner and Brahms. Special emphasis on the post- 

eethoven schism and its ramifications. P — Music 174, 182 or permission of in- 

ructor. 

24. Seminar in Twentieth Century Music. (3) A study of the major musical styles, 
chniques, and media of contemporary music from Debussy to the present. P — 
ifusic 174, 182 or permission of instructor. 



Music Education 

386. String Instruments. (2) Fundamentals of playing and teaching all instruments of 
me string family. Offered in alternate years. 

1 87. Woodwind Instruments. (2) Fundamentals of playing and teaching all principle 
instruments of the woodwind family. Offered in alternate years. 

88. Brass and Percussion Instruments. (2) Fundamentals of playing and teaching 
rass and percussion instruments. Offered in alternate years. 

80. Orchestration. (4) A study of the orchestral and wind band instruments, how 
omposers have used them throughout history, and the development of practical 
coring and manuscript skills. Offered in alternate years. P — Music 174, 182. 



82. Conducting. (4) A study of conducting technique; practical experience with 
nsembles. P — Music 174 or permission of instructor. 



) 84. Music Literature Seminar. (3 or 4) A survey of repertoire, including an exami- 
nation of teaching materials in the student's special area of interest. P — Permission of 
he instructor. 



!89. Ensemble Methods. (2) A practical study of choral and instrumental training 
echniques. Discussion of tonal development, administration, bibliography, choral 
nd instrumental repertoire, marching band, and instrumental problems. P — Music 
d 01 or 102 or permission of instructor. 

■ 191. Teaching of Music. (4) The teaching and supervision of choral and instrumental 
nusic in the public schools, all grades. P — Music 174, 182. 



110 

Honors and Individual Study 

298. Individual Study. (2 or 4) A project in an area of study not otherwise availably 

the department. By pre-arrangement. 

299. Honors in Music. (4) Individual study for honors candidates who have fulfil 
the specific requirements. 

Ensemble 

Departmental ensembles are open to all students. Credit is earned on the basis I 
one credit per semester of participation. 

111. Opera Workshop. Study, staging, and performance of standard and conte- 
porary operatic works. P — Permission of instructor. 

112. Collegium Musicum. An ensemble stressing the performance practices and t 
performance of music of the medieval. Renaissance, and Baroque eras. Open 
vocalists and instrumentalists. 

113. Orchestra. Studv and performance of orchestral works from the classical ai 
contemporary repertoire. P — Audition. 

115. Choral Union. A large oratorio chorus which concentrates on the performan 
of major choral works. P — Audition. 

115a. Concert Choir. A select touring choir of forty-five voices which perform^ 
varietv of choral literature from all periods. P — Audition. 

117. Marching Deacons Band. Performs for most football games. Meets twi 
weeklv. No audition required. Fall. 

118. Concert Band. Studv and performance of music for wind band. P — Permissio 
of instructor. Spring. 

119. Symphonic Wind Ensemble. Study and performance of music for wind ensen 
ble. Regular performances on and off campus, including an annual tour. P- 
Audition. 

121. Jazz Ensemble. Studv and performance of written and improvised jazz for 
twentv-member ensemble. P — Audition. 

123. Piano Ensemble. Study of the elements of accompanying and ensemble playinj 
through class discussion and studio experience. P — Permission of instructor. 

Applied Music 

Applied music courses are open to all students with the permission of the instrui 
tor. Credit is earned on the basis of lesson duration and weeklv preparation. One 
credit per semester implies a half-hour of instruction weekly and a minimum of one 
hour of dailv practice. Two credits per semester imply an hour of instruction weeklv 
and a minimum of two hours dailv practice. With the permission of the music faculty 
and with a proportional increase in practice, a student may earn three or four credits 
per semester. Students in applied music who do not have basic knoyvledge of notation 



a. violin 


f- 


oboe 


b. viola 


g- 


clarinet 


c. cello 


h. 


bassoon 


d. bass 


i. 


saxophone 


e. flute 


J- 


trumpet 



111 

id rhythm are advised to enroll in Music 101 either prior to or in conjunction with 
>plied study. An applied music fee and practice fee are charged for all individual 
struction. 

>1, 261. Individual Instruction. (1 or 2) May be repeated for credit. Technical 
f udies and repetoire of progressive difficulty selected to meet the needs and abilities 
' the student. 

k. French horn p. piano 

I. trombone q. percussion 

i; c. cello h. bassoon m. baritone r. guitar 

n. tuba v. voice 
o. organ 

i5p. Class Piano. (1) Scales, chords, inversions, and appropriate repertoire, with 
nphasis on sight-reading, harmonization, and simple transposition. Designed for 
Lie beginning piano student. 

35v. Class Voice I. (1) Introduction to the fundamental principles of singing; 
incepts of breath control, tone, and resonance. 

56v. Class Voice II. (1) Continuation of fundamental vocal techniques. P — Music 
, 55v or permission of instructor. 

57v. Theatrical Singing I: Class Voice (1) Basic techniques of singing, breath 
imtrol, phonation, and resonance, with emphasis on theatrical projection. Study and 
erformance of musical theatre repertoire. (One hour per week). 

68v. Theatrical Singing II: Class Voice (1) Continuation of theatrical singing 

■chniques with increased study and performance of musical theatre repertoire. 

— Music 167v or permission of instructor. (One hour per week). 
i< 
90. Diction for Singers. (2) Study of articulation in singing, with emphasis on 

lodification of English; pronunciation of Italian, German, and French. Develop- 
ment of articulatory and aural skills with use of the international phonetic alphabet, 
ndividual performance and coaching in class. (Two hours per week). 

Philosophy 

jj Gregory D. Pritchard, Chairman 

Professors Robert M. Helm, Marcus B. Hester, Gregory D. Pritchard 

Associate Professor Charles M. Lewis 
! 

Assistant Professor Ralph C. Kennedy III 

A major in philosophy requires thirty-six credits. The courses must include 261 
'• nd either 161 or 271, two courses from the history sequence (201, 211, 222), and one 
ourse from each of the following: 230, 23 1 , 24 1 , or 242; 279, 285, or 287; and 294 or 
95. 

The Spilman Philosophy Seminar, open to advanced students in philosophy, was 
stablished in 1934 through an endowment provided by Bernard W. Spilman. The 
icome from the endowment is used for the seminar library, which now contains 



112 

about 4,000 volumes. Additional support for the library and other departmeial 1 
activities is provided by the A. C. Reid Philosophy Fund, which was establishedn 
1960 by friends of the department. The furniture in the library and seminar ro'U I , 
was donated in honor of Claude V. Roebuck and Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Hough by th,r j 
families. 

Two distinguished alumni of the College have made possible the establishment < a ! 
lectureship and a seminar. The late Guy T. Carswell endowed the Guy T. and CI a r 
Carswell Philosophy Lectureship, and a gift from James Montgomery Hester esui I 
lished the Hester Philosophy Seminar. In addition, a lectureship bearing his nais 
has been instituted in honor of Claude V. Roebuck. 

Highly qualified majors are invited by the department to apply for admission to t ; | 
honors program in philosophy. To be graduated with the designation "Honors i I 
Philosophy," a student must submit an acceptable prospectus for an honors thesis 
November for graduation in the spring semester or by May for graduation in the 1.1 
semester, present a satisfactory paper based on the prospectus, and show an acce| 
able level of performance in a discussion of the paper with the honors adviser and 
least one other member of the departmental faculty. 

111. Basic Problems of Philosophy. (4) An examination of the basic concepts < I 
several representative philosophers, including their accounts of the nature of knov 
ledge, man, God, mind, and matter. 

133. Space and Time in Fact and Fiction. (4) Are space and time fundamental 
different? Are they properties of the physical world or of minds only? Are they finil 
or infinite in extension and duration? Other questions cover problems and paradox* 
in the concept of space and in the concept of time travel. 

161. Logic. (4) An elementary study of the laws of valid inference, recognition < 
fallacies, and logical analysis. 

171, 172. Meaning and Value in Western Thought. (4,4) A critical survey of religioi 
and philosophical ideas in the Western world from antiquity to modern times. Eithe 
Philosophy 1 7 1 or 1 72 satisfies the philosophy or religion requirement; both 1 7 1 an 
172 satisfy both the philosophy and religion requirements; choice determined a 
registration. 

201. Ancient and Medieval Philosophy. (4) A study of philosophical problems sue! 
as the nature of faith, reason, universals, and God in the thought of Plato, Aristotle 
Augustine, Abelard, Anselm, Aquinas, and Ockham. P — Philosophy 111, 171, oi 
172. 

211. Modern Philosophy. (4) A survey of major philosophers from Descartes to 
Nietzsche. P— Philosophy 111, 171, or 172. 

222. Contemporary Philosophy. (4) A survey of major philosophers from Russell t< 
Sartre. P— Philosophy 111, 171, or 172. 

230. Plato. (4) A detailed analysis of selected dialogues, covering Plato's most impor- 
tant contributions to ethics, political philosophy, theory of knowledge, metaphysics, 
and theology. P — Philosophy 111, 171, or 172. 



113 

1. Aristotle. (4) A study of the major texts, with emphasis on metaphysics, ethics, 
4d theory of knowledge. P— Philosophy 111, 171, or 172. 

2:1. Kant. (4) A detailed study of selected works covering Kant's most important 
ntrihutions to theory of knowledge, metaphysics, ethics, and religion. P — 
lilosophy 111, 171, or 172. 

t 2. Hegel, Kierkegaard, and Sartre. (4) An examination of selected sources 
smabodying the basic concepts of Hegel, Kierkegaard, and Sartre, especially as they 
Jdlate to each other in terms of influence, development, and opposition. P — 

lilosophy 111, 171, or 172. 

°|il. Ethics. (4) A critical study of selected problems and representative works in 
M hical theory. P— Philosophy 111, 171, or 172. 

,i ,'1. Symbolic Logic. (4) Basic concepts and techniques of modern deductive logic, 
•ginning with the logic of truth functions and quantification theory. Attention given 
i advanced topics such as descriptions, classes, and number, and to issues in the 
lilosophy of logic. 

'5. Concepts of the Self: (4) A systematic examination of selected texts, classical and 
intemporary, dealing with the origin, nature, powers, and fate of the self. Authors 
udied include Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Locke, Hume, Kant, and Wittgenstein, 
ot open to students who have credit for Philosophy 1 37. P — Philosophy 111, 171, or 

i f 7 2. 

19. Philosophy of Science. (4) A systematic exploration of the conceptual founda- 
)ns of scientific thought and procedure. P — Philosophv 111, 171, or 172. 

12. Philosophy of Law. (4) A philosophical inquiry into the nature of law and its 

■lation to morality. Classroom discussions of readings from the works of classical 
id modern authors focus on issues of contemporary concern involving questions of 

1 gal principle, personal liberty, human rights, responsibility, justice, and punish- 

>ent. P— Philosophy 111, 171, or 172. 

15. Philosophy of Art. (4) A critical examination of several philosophies of art, with 
nphasis upon the application of these theories to particular works of art. P — 
lilosophy 111, 171, or 172. 

[37. Philosophy of Religion. (4) A systematic analysis of the logical structure of 
.'ligious language and belief, including an examination of religious experience, 

ysticism, revelation, and arguments for the nature and existence of God. P — 

nilosophy 111, 171, or 172. 

JO. Readings in Philosophy. (4) A discussion of several important works in philoso- 
hy or closely related areas. P — Philosophy 111, 171, or 172. 

92. Wittgenstein. (4) A senior seminar in which the work of Ludwig Wittgenstein on 
;veral central philosophical problems is studied and compared with that of Frege, 
lmes, and Russell. Topics include the picture theory of meaning, truth, scepticism, 
rivate languages, thinking, feeling, the mystical, and the ethical. P — Philosophv 111, 
71, or 172. 



114 

294. Seminar in Epistemological Problems. (4) A senior course requiring a map 
research paper. P — Philosophy 1 1 1, 171, or 172. 

295. Seminar in Metaphysical Problems. (4) A senior course requiring a maj 
research paper. P — Philosophy 111, 171, or 172. 

297, 298. Seminar: Advanced Problems in Philosophy. (4, 4) Senior courses treatii 
selected topics in philosophy. P — Philosophy 111, 171, or 172. 

Physical Education 

William L. Hottinger, Chairman 

Associate Professors William L. Hottinger, Paul M. Ribisl 

Assistant Professors W. Thomas Boone, Dorothy Casey, Leo Ellison, 

Walter Rejeski 

Visiting Assistant Professor Sarah D. Hutslar 

Lecturer J. William Dellastatious 

Instructors Donald Bergey, Deborah S. David, Gail L. Sailer, 

Gale Chamblee 

The purpose of the Department of Physical Education is to organize, administe 
and supervise ( 1 ) a professional education program which prepares students interested i 
the field of physical education; (2) a required! elective physical education program consis 
ing of conditioning activities, dance, and individual and team sports; and (3) a 
intramural sports program which provides a wide variety of competitive activities. 

Physical Education Requirement 

All entering students are required to complete two semesters of physical education 
Physical Education 1 11, Foundations of Health and Physical Fitness, and one additions 
course selected from the 100-series of physical education courses. The requiremen 
must be met before enrollment in additional courses for electives. It is recommends 
that the requirement be completed by the end of the student's first year; it must b 
completed by the end of the second year. 

Courses in Basic Instruction and Elective Physical Education 

11F Foundations of Health and Physical Fitness 

112. Sports Proficiency 

113. Adaptive Physical Education 

114. Weight Control 

115. Physical Conditioning 

116. Weight Training 

120. Beginning Dance Technique 

121. Intermediate Dance Technique (P— Physical Education 120 or permission of instructor) 

122. Advanced Dance Technique (P— Physical Education 121 or permission of instructor) 

123. Dance Composition (P~Physical Education 121) 

124. Social Dance 

125. Folk/Square Dance 



115 



l 30. Beginning Tumbling/Free Exercise 
31. Intermediate Tumbling! Free Exercise 
J 2. Beginning Gymnastic Apparatus 

33. Intermediate Gymnastic Apparatus 

34. Aero-Sports 

{ '10. Beginning Swimming 

11. Intermediate/ Advanced Swimming 

12. Beginning Scuba Diving 

13. Water Ballet/ Synchronized Sivimming 

14. Springboard Diving 

15. Advanced Lifesaving and Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation (P — Strong swimming 
ability) 

16. Water Safety Instructor's Course (P — Current advanced lifesaving certification) 

50. Beginning Tennis 

51. Intermediate Tennis 

52. Advanced Tennis (P — Physical Education 151 or permission of instructor) 

53. Beginning! Intermediate Racqueiball 

54. Beginning/Intermediate Badminton 

55. Beginning Squash Racquets 
*50. Beginning Golf 

"52. Intermediate Golf 

52. Archery 

53. Bowling 

54. Beginning/Intermediate Handball 

55. Recreational Games 
JO. Volleyball 

Jl. Soccer 

J 5. Wrestling 

1 76. Fencing 

I 79. Beginning Horseback Riding 

50. Intermediate/ Advanced Horseback Riding 

51. Snow Skiing 

52. Beginning Ice Figure Skating 

53. Intermediate/ Advanced Ice Figure Skating 
10. Sports Option 



Courses for the Major 

Students desiring to elect a major in physical education must be of junior standing, 
iology 111 and 150 are required, along with the following courses in physical 
iucation/health: 220, 221, 222, 224, 230, 240, 250, 352, 353, 357, 360, and 363. 

Highly qualified majors are invited by the department to apply for admission to the 
onors program in physical education. To be graduated with the designation "Hou- 
rs in Physical Education," they must participate satisfactorily in Physical Education 
B2 and pass a comprehensive written examination. Upon satisfactory completion ol 
lese requirements they are recommended for graduation with "Honors in Physical 



116 



Education." For additional information members of the departmental faculty shou 
be consulted. 

Any student interested in majoring in physical education should consult tl 
chairman of the department as soon as possible after entering the University. 

201. Outdoor Exploration. (2) Introduction to various outdoor recreational a 
survival skills. (Offered jointly with Military Science.) 

212. The Psychology of Sport. (3) A study of the psychological and sociological bas 
underlying sports, games, dance, and gymnastics and the impact these forces no 
have on society and culture. 

220. Methods and Materials in Aquatics. (2) Presentation of knowledge, skill, an 
methods of teaching acquatics. 

221. Methods and Materials in Gymnastics and Dance. (2) Presentation of knov 
ledge, skill, and methods of teaching gymnastics and dance. 

222. Methods and Materials in Teaching and Coaching Team Sports. (4) Present; 
don of knowledge, skill, and methods of teaching, coaching, and officiating teai 
sports. 

223. Health and Physical Education for the Intermediate Grades. (4) The develop 
ment of physical education skills appropriate for the intermediate grade teacher an 
an understanding of the personal and community health needs appropriate for th 
grade level. 

224. Methods and Materials in Team and Individual Sports. (4) Theory and practic 
in organization and teaching selected individual and dual sports in a comprehensiv 
physical education program. 

230. First Aid and Athletic Training. (2) A study of first aid techniques and the can 
and treatment of athletic injuries. 

240. Physical Education for Pre-School and Elementary School. (3) A study of th< 
developmental stages of fundamental motor skills and a presentation of methods o 
teaching physical education activities to the pre-school and elementary school child 

250. Principles, Organization, and Administration of Health, Physical Educatior 
and Athletics. (4) A study of principles, organization, and administration of healtt 
physical education, and athletics. 

310. Applied Field Study. (2) A course involving application of theory and method 
of solving problems in a specialized area according to the student's immediate caree 
goals. P — Physical Education 250 or permission of instructor. 

352. Anatomy and Physiology. (5) A course to provide students of physical educatiol 

with a functional knowledge of the anatomical structure and physiological functiol 
of the human body. 

353. Physiology of Exercise. (4) The course presents the many effects of muscula 
activity on the processes of the bodv which constitute the scientific basis of physica 
education. 



117 

ki7. Kinesiology and Adapted Physical Education. (5) A study of the principles of 
iman motion based on anatomical, physiological, and mechanical principles and 
e application of these principles along with other special considerations in develop- 
g a program for the atypical student. 

; >0. Evaluation and Measurement in Health and Physical Education. (3) A course 
measurement techniques and beginning statistical procedures to determine pupil 

itus in established standards of health and physical education which reflect the 
evailing educational philosophy. 

>3. Personal and Community Health and Safety Education. (3) A course present- 
g personal, family, and community health problems; a study of safety in the schools. 

12. Individual Study in Health and Physical Education. ( 1—4) Library conferences 
id laboratory research performed on an individual basis. 



Physics 

■ 'j 

: y George P. Williams Jr., Chairman 

Professors Robert W. Brehme, Ysbrand Haven, Howard W. Shields, 

George P. Williams Jr. 

Associate Professor William C. Kerr 

Assistant Professor George Eric Matthews 

The program of courses for each student majoring in physics is developed through 
jmsultation with the student's major adviser and may lead to either a Bachelor of 
jrts or a Bachelor of Science degree. The B.A. degree requires a minimum of basic 

lysics courses and allows a wide selection of electives related to the students 

terests in other disciplines. The B.S. degree is designed to prepare students for 
: 'reers in physics, perhaps beginning with graduate study. 

The Bachelor of Arts degree in physics requires thirty-seven credits in physics and 
fust include courses 141, 161, 162, 345, and two from 230, 352, and 351. The 
,ichelor of Science degree in physics requires forty-five credits in physics and must 
i elude courses 311,312, 343, 344, 345, and 346. In special cases the department may 

low substitutions. For either degree, two courses in chemistry or the equivalent and 

athematics 251 are required. 

A typical schedule for the first two years: 

« Freshman Sophomore 

j Basic and divisional requirements Basic and divisional requirements 

Physics 111, 112 or 121, 122 (live courses) 

Mathematics 111, 112 Physics 141, 162 

'Foreign Language Mathematics 251 

If this sequence is followed, the physics major may be completed in such a way as to 
low considerable flexibility in exercising various options, such as the five-year 
A. /M.S. program. (See Graduate Bulletin.) This saves not only time, but theoutstand- 
g student may qualify for a tuition scholarship in the senior year of the five-year 
ogram. 



118 

If Physics 111, 112 or 121, 122 is not taken in the freshman year, one oft 
sequences may be taken in the sophomore year; the degree requirements in phvs 
may still be completed by the end of the senior year. No student may be a candid; 
for a degree with a major in physics with a grade less than C in general physics withe 
special permission of the department. 

Satisfactory completion of the laboratory work is required for a passing grade in 
courses with a laboratory. 

Highly qualified majors are invited by the department to apply for admission tot 
honors program in physics. To be graduated with the designation "Honors 
Physics," they must complete satisfactorily Physics 381 and pass a comprehensi 
written examination. For additional information on these programs or on the e 
gineering program the chairman or a member of the departmental faculty shoulc 
consulted. 

101. Conceptual Physics. (5) A non-mathematical introduction to the essent 
principles of classical and modern physics based on a conceptual treatment of tl ! 
more exciting contemporary aspects of the subject. Credit not allowed for both If 
and 111. Lab — two hours. 

104. Introductory Physics for Teachers. (3 or 4) No lab. Does not satisfy Divisioi 
requirements. 

105. Descriptive Astronomy. (4) An introductory study of the universe, from tl 
solar system to the galaxies. No lab. Does not satisfy Division II requirements. 

106. Physics and the Sounds of Music. (3 or 4) A study of the production, propag 
tion, and perception of musical sounds. Satisfies no divisional requirements. N 
prerequisites; no lab. 

108. Energy and the Environment. (2) A descriptive, non-mathematical introductii 
to the concept of energy and its role in the environment. Does not satisfy Division 
requirements. 

Ill, 112. Introductory Physics. (5, 5) Essentials of mechanics, wave motion, he;t 
sound, electricity, magnetism, optics, and modern physics for freshmen and soph< 
mores. Lab — two hours. 

121, 122. General Physics. (5, 5) A course designed for those who expect to major i 
physics or chemistry. A calculus treatment of the topics covered in 111, 112 
student may not receive credit for both this course and Physics 111, 112. Lah> — tw 
hours. C — Mathematics 111. 

141. Elementary Modern Physics. (4) The development of twentieth century physic 
and an introduction to quantum ideas. P — Physics 1 12 or 121; C — Mathematics 1 1! 

161. Applied Mechanics. (5) The fundamental principles of mechanics. Lab — thre : 
hours. Offered in the spring of even-numbered years. P — Physics 111 or 121 an 
Mathematics 1 1 1 or equivalent. 

162. Introductory Electricity. (5) The fundamental principles of electricity, magnt I 
tism, and electromagnetic radiation. Lab — three hours. P — Physics 112; C- I 
Mathematics 1 12. 






119 



0. Electronics. (4) Introduction to the theory and application of transistors and 

xtronic circuits. Lab — three hours. Offered in the fall of odd-numbered years. P — 

\ysics 162 or equivalent. 
i 

1, 302. Physics Seminar. (0, 0) Discussion of contemporary research, usually with 

,iting scientists. Attendance required of junior and senior physics majors. 

1. Mechanics. (4) A junior/senior level treatment of analytic classical mechanics. 
'-Mathematics 251. 

2. Electromagnetic Theory. (4) Ajunior/senior level treatment of classical electro- 
ignetic theory. P — Physics 162 and Mathematics 251. 

! 1, 332. Acoustics I, II. (4, 4) A study of the fundamental principles and applica- 
nt of the generation, transmission, and reception of sound and its interaction with 
rious media. 

.3, 344. Modern Physics. (4, 4) Application of the elementary principles of quan- 
m mechanics to atomic and molecular phvsics. 

5, 346. Modern Physics Laboratory. (1, 1) 4 he laboratory associated with 
lysics 343, 344. Lab — three hours. 

'1. Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics. (4, 4) Introduction to classical and 
itistical thermodynamics and distribution functions. Offered in the spring oj odd- 
■ ruber ed years. 

>2. Physical Optics and Spectra. (5) A study of physical optics and the quantum 
?atment of spectra. Lah> — three hours. Offered in the fall oj even-numbered years. 

II. Research. (4) Library, conference, and laboratory work performed on an 
dividual basis. 



Politics 

James A Steintrager, Chairman 

Professors Jack D. Fleer, C. H. Richards Jr., James A Steintrager 

Professor of History and Asian Studies Balkrishna Govind Gokhale 

Associate Professors David B. Broyles, Carl C. Moses, 

Jon M. Reinhardt, Donald O. Schoonmaker, Richard D. Sears 

Instructor Robert L. Utley 

: In its broadest conception, the aim of the study of politics is to understand the way 
which policy for a society is formulated and executed and to understand the moral 
mdards by which policy is or ought to be set. This center of interest is often 
•scribed alternatively as the study of power, of government, of the state, or of 
iman relations in their political context. For teaching purposes, the study of politics 
is been divided by the department into the following fields: (1) American politics, 

11 ) comparative politics, (3) political philosophy, and (4) international politics. Intro- 
tctory courses in the first three of these fields provide broad and flexible 
•proaches to studying political life. 



120 

The major in politics consists of thirty-six credits, of which no more than foi 
credits may be earned in January courses. The courses must include the following; 
a first course selected from Politics 1 13, 1 14, or 1 15; (1)) any one introductory c 
advanced course in each of the four fields of the discipline, restricted to non-semin; 
courses; (c) one seminar in politics (usually a student takes no more than one semini 
in each field and no more than three seminars overall). A minimum grade average J 
C on all courses attempted in politics is required for graduation. Majors shou 
consult with their advisers concerning additional regulations. 

Highly qualified majors are invited by the department to apply for admission to to 
honors program in politics. To be graduated with the designation "Honors i 
Politics," they must successfully complete Politics 284 and one seminar course. F( •] 
additional information members of the departmental faculty should be consultec "ij 

A student who selects politics to fulfill the Division IV requirement must take or 
of the following courses: Politics 1 13, 1 14, or 1 15. No introductory level course 
required for students taking a politics course as an elective unless such a prerequisil 
is specified in the course description. 






Introductory Courses 

A student may take any one of the following as the first course in the departmen 
more than one may be taken. Ordinarily a student is expected to take Politics 113; 
the first course. 

113. Introduction to Politics: American Politics. (4) The nature of politics, politic 
principles, and political institutions, with emphasis on their application to the Unite 
States. 

114. Introduction to Politics: Comparative Politics. (4) Political processes an; 
principles as applied to traditional, developing, and mature states. 

115. Introduction to Politics: Political Theory. (4) Major systematic statements ( 
the rules and principles of political life. Representative writers are Tocqueville, Dali 
and Aristotle. 

American Politics 

210. Public Policy Analysis. (4) Analysis of the substance of public problems air 
policy alternatives. Examination of why government pursues certain policies and th 
consequences of those policies. 

211. Political Parties and Voting Behavior. (4) An examination of party competi 

tion, party organizations, the electorate and electoral activities of parties, and th 
responsibilities of parties for governing. 

213. Public Administration. (4) Introduction to the study of public administrauoi 

emphasizing policy-making in government agencies. 

218. Congress and Policy-Making. (4) An examination of the composition, authorit 
structures, external influences, and procedures of Congress with emphasis on thei 
implications for policy-making in the United States. 






■ , 



m 

0. The American Presidency. (4) Emphasis on the office and the role; contribu- 
>ns by contemporary presidents considered in perspective. 

1. North Carolina Politics. (4) A study of three major components of the state's 
i )litical system: electoral competition, legislative politics, and executive politics (par- 

ularly the office of governor). Offered in January. 

\\2. Urban Problems and Politics. (4) Political structures and processes in American 
ies and suburbs as they relate to the social, economic, and political problems of the 
etropolis. 

!5. American Constitutional Law: Separation of Powers and the Federal System. 

) An analysis of Supreme Court decisions affecting the three branches of the 
itional government and federal/state relations. 

J6. American Constitutional Law: Civil Liberties. (4) Judicial interpretations of 
j rst Amendment freedoms, racial equality, and the rights of the criminally accused. 

'■17. Politics, Law, and the Legal Process. (4) Analysis of the nature and possible 
•urces of law, the proper role of law in social change, structure and process in the 
gal system, and the impact of legally decided policies on society, including their 
ropensity for justice and fairness in American democratic society. 

r 28. Watergate. (3, 4) An investigation of the Watergate crisis in the context of the 
■political scandals of American history. 



Comparative Politics 

1 31. Western European Politics. (4) Analysis of the political systems of Great Britain, 
ranee, and Italy, focusing primarily on the problems of stable democracy. 

32. Government and Politics in the Soviet Union. (4) Analysis of the institutions 
nd processes of politics in the USSR and examination of political developments in 
jjie other states of Eastern Europe. 

''33. The Politics of West and East Germany. (4) A study of the political behavior and 
overnmental institutions of the capitalist democratic regime of West Germany and 
le authoritarian socialist regime of East Germany. 

34. Goverment and Politics in East Asia. (4) An analysis of the political institutions 
i nd processes in China and Japan, with emphasis on the problem of modernization. 

'35. The Politics of Revolution. (4) The comparative study of revolution as a 
listorical phenomenon and as an alternative means of change in the contemporary 
/orld. Analysis of the nature, the background and causes, the processes, the varieties, 
nd the consequences of revolution, and an attempt to assess the capabilities or 
>otential of some current movements purporting to be revolutionary. Some revolu- 
ions receiving particular attention are those of England, France, Russia, Mexico, 
^uba, and China, and some broad movements included are the New Left and 
ontemporary anarchism in the United States and Western Europe. 

!36. Government and Politics in Latin America. (4) Comparative analysis of the 
nstitutions and processes of politics in the Latin American region. 



122 

238. History, Culture, and Political Change. (4) The study of how major cultui 
articulate or symbolize their existence either in history or moving through histo 
Special attention given to an evaluation of current concepts applied to politic 
change. 

239. Comparative Bureaucratic Elites. (4) An investigation of the role of top ei 
servants in the decision-making process of industrialized political svstems. Tl* 
dilemma of bureaucratic power and democratic accountability explored in the pol 
tical svstems of the United States, West Germany, Great Britain, France, Italy, at 
one of the Scandinavian countries. 

240. Socialism in Cuba. (4) An intensive study of contemporary Cuba embracii 
consideration of several aspects: the origins and course of development of the Cuba 
variety of socialism; the political, economic, and social structures, methods, policie 
and goals; the status and role of leaders and institutions; comparison with some otht 
major Marxist regimes; and prospects for the future. Offered in January. 

241. Politics in Mexico. (4) A study of Mexican political life from historical an 
sociocultural perspectives, focusing particularly upon the subject of political cultui 
and socialization. One week on campus, the remainder in Mexico. Offered in Januar 

242. Problems in Comparative Politics. (4) An intensive study of one or more majt 
problems in contemporary comparative politics. 

245. Government and Politics of South Asia. (4) A study of the governments d] 
India, Pakistan, Nepal, and Ceylon. Emphasis on political organizations, party struc 
tures, and subnational governmental systems. 

248. Political and Economic Systems. (4) An investigation of the way in whic! 

political and economic svstems impinge on each other. The chief focus is on the wa k 
in which a particular economic system affects a political system. Offered in Janua>\ \ 

International Politics 

251. Fundamentals of International Politics. (4) Fundamental theoretical question j 
of international politics, with special emphasis on existing international patterns, s 

252. Current Problems in International Politics. (4) An intensive study of one oi 
more major problems of contemporary international politics. 

254. American Foreign Policy: Contemporary Problems. (4) A critical examination 
of different methods of studying American foreign policy and of selected policies 
followed by the United States since the early 1960s. 

255. American Foreign Policy: The Cold War Period. (4) A critical examination of 
the forces which shape American foreign policy and of selected policies followed 
from World War II to the Cuban Missile Crisis. 

256. The Cold War: Research in Washington, D. C. (4) The course focuses on Cold 
War research in Washington, D. C, using the resources of the National Archives and 
the Library of Congress. Offered in January. 



123 

Political Philosophy 

I 1. Plato, Aristotle, and Classical Political Philosophy. (4) An examination of the 
ture and goals of the classical position, with attention to its origins in ancient 
hens and its diffusion through Rome and the medieval world. Representative 

1 iters are Plato, Aristotle, and Cicero. 

. 2. Equality and Liberty. (4) The arguments for and against democracy and 
publicanism, majority rule, and the rights of man. Representative writers are 
)usseau and Mill. 

3. Radical Critiques of Political Society. (4) Anarchist, socialist, and communist 
.iticisms of and alternatives to existing political societies, with special attention to 

ch problems as utopianism and alienation. Representative writers are Marx and 
jietzsche. 

'5. Theory of the American Polity. (4) Critical examination of the nature of the 
merican polity as expressed by its founders and leading statesmen. Representative 
riters are the Federalists, Lincoln, and Wilson. Does not meet theory distribution 
quirement for majors. 

f6. Medieval Political Philosophy. (4) Philosophy and religion in cooperation and 
(inflict. Emphasis on Christian writers with some attention to Muslim and Jewish, 
epresentative writers are Aquinas, Dante, and Maimonides. 

78. Foundations of Modern Political Philosophy. (4) An examination of the essen- 

'il writings of thinkers who broke with the past in an attempt to establish a more 

ealistic" approach to the study of politics. Representative writers are Machiavelli, 

obbes, and Locke. 

i 

79. Minor Classics in Political Thought. (4) The study of one or two authors of 
nportance not ordinarily covered in courses in political thought or the study of 
dnor writings of major authors. Examples: Xenophon, Averroes, Swift, and Locke's 
irst Treatise. Offered in January. 

Honors and Individual Study 

84. Honors Study. (4) A conference course with a faculty committee. Readings in 
'veral fields provide the basis for an extensive paper on a subject of special interest to 
le student. This course is taken in the senior year by all candidates for departmental 
onors. 

87. Individual Study. (2, 3, or 4) Internships, work/study projects, and other 
idividual study programs. 

Seminars 

91. Seminar in American Politics. (4) Readings, research, and independent study 
n selected topics. P — Permission of instructor. 

92. Seminar in Comparative Politics. (4) Readings, research, and independent 
udy on selected topics. P — Permission of instructor. 



124 

293. Seminar in International Politics. (4) Readings, research, and independti 
study on selected topics. P — Permission of instructor. 

294. Seminar in Political Philosophy. (4) Readings, research, and independt 
study on selected topics. P — Permission of instructor. 

Psychology 

John E. Williams, Chairman 

Professors Robert C. Beck, Robert H. Dufort, John E. Williams 

Associate Professors David W. Catron, Philippe R. Falkenberg, 

David Allen Hills, Charles L. Richman, John J. Woodmansee 

Assistant Professor Cecilia H. Solano 

Adjunct Assistant Professor Frank B. Wood 

Visiting Assistant Professors C. Drew Edwards, Jean C. Seeman, Wayne M. Sotil 

Lecturer Brian M. Austin 

Instructors Deborah L. Best, Anne B. Meinrath, Mark H. Meinrath 

Adjunct Instructors Sam T. Manoogian, David S. Stump 

Psychology 151 is prerequisite to all courses of a higher number. Courses nun 
be red below 151 do not count toward Division IV requirements or toward the majn 
in psychology. Psychology 211, or special permission of the instructor, is prerequisit 
for all 300-level courses except 313, 335, 344, 358, and 367. 

It is recommended that students who are considering psychology as a major tak 
Psychology 151 in their freshman year and Psychology 211 in the fall of thei 
sophomore year. An average of C or higher in psychology courses is required at tb 
time the major is elected. The major in psychology requires the completion of ; 
minimum of forty credits in psychology, including 151, 211, 212, and 313. Ii 
addition, the major student must complete one course from each of the following 
groups: 320, 326, 329, and 333; 341, 351, 355, and 362. No more than forty-eighj 
psychology credits may be counted toward the graduation requirements. 

Highly qualified majors are invited by the department to participate in the honor: 
program in psychology. To be graduated with the designation "Honors in Psych 
ology," the student must complete satisfactorily a special sequence of courses (381 
383) and pass an oral or written examination. In addition, the honors student 
normally has a non-credit research apprenticeship with a faculty member. For more 
detailed information members of the departmental faculty should be consulted. 

100. Learning to Learn. (4) A workshop to help people improve their learning skills 
through the application of basic principles of learning, remembering, and so forth 
Students at all levels welcomed. No prerequisite. Pass/Fail only. 

102. Exploration of Career Planning. (4) Examination of educational/vocationa 
planning as a personal process, based on knowledge of self and the work world. N< 
prerequisite. 

151. Introductory Psychology. (4) A systematic survey of psychology as the scientific 
study of behavior. Prerequisite to all courses of a higher number. 



IK I 



125 

1. 212. Research Methods in Psychology. (5, 5) Introduction to the design and 
tistical analysis of psychological research. Lab — twice weekly. P — Psychology 151. 



1 9. Altered States of Consciousness. (4) Examination of altered states of conscious- 
ss with special reference to sleep and dreams, meditation, hypnosis, and drugs. 
-Psychology 151. 

1. Developmental Psychology. (3 or 4) Survey of physical, emotional, cognitive, 
d social development in humans from conception to death. P — Psychology 151. 

5. Survey of Abnormal Behavior. (3 or 4) Study of problem behaviors such as 
pression, alcoholism, antisocial personality, the schizophrenias, and pathogenic 
; rsonality patterns, with emphasis on causes, prevention, and the relationships of 
ese disorders to normal lifestyles. P — Psychology 151. 

jl ,0. Psychology Abroad. (4) The study of psychology in foreign countries. Content 
d travel plans vary from year to year depending upon interests of faculty and 
idents. Usually off eredin January. P — Psychology 151. 

>5. Theories of Personality. (3 or 4) A comparative study of classical and contem- 
>rary theories of human personality. P — Psychology 151. 

40. Social Psychology. (3 or 4) A survey of the field, including theories of social 
i'havior, interpersonal attraction, attitudes and attitude change, and group be- 
ivior. P — Psychology 151. 



>4. The Therapeutic Process. (4) Theories and laboratory practice of a variety of 
lychotherapeutic methods, with special emphasis on developing the student's facili- 
tive skills as a therapeutic agent. P — Psychology 151. 



)5. Human Sexuality: A Changing Scene. (4) An exploration of the psychological 
iid physiological aspects of human sexuality, with attention to changing sexual 
;ores, sexual deviances, sexual dysfunction, and sex-related roles. P — Psychology 

)1. 

)8. Psychology of Business and Industry. (3 or 4) Psychological principles and 
ethods applied to problems commonly encountered in business and industry. 
—Psychology 151. 

70. Topics in Psychology. (1,2, or 3) The student selects from among a group of 
tort one-credit courses dealing with topics of special interest. The courses meet 
quentially, not concurrently, and options are offered in each portion of the semes- 
' r. P — Psychology 151. 

270A Aggression 270H Intelligence 

270B Applications of Psychology 2701 Race and Young Children 

270C Biofeedback 270] Memory 

' 270D Brain/Behavior Relations 270K Psychology and Politics 

270E Emotion 270L Sex Stereotypes and Roles 

270F Human Sexuality 270M The Gifted and Creative Person 

27 0G Information-Processing 27 ON Liking and Loving Relationships 



126 

275. Issues in Psychology. (4) Seminar on contemporary theoretical and reseai 
issues in psychology. P — -Psychology 151. 

280. Directed Study. (1-4) Student research performed under faculty supervisioj 

P — Psychology 151 and approval of faculty member prior to registration. 

281. Individual Study. (4) A special project conducted under faculty supervisio 
P — Psychology 151 and permission of the department. 

313. History and Systems of Psychology. (4) The development of psychologic; 
thought and research from ancient Greece to present trends, with emphasis of 
intensive examination of original sources. P — Psychology 151. 

320. Physiological Psychology. (4) Neurophysiological and neuroanatomical expk 
nations of behavior. P — Psychology 211 or permission of instructor. 

322. Behavior Genetics. (2) A study of the effects of genes and chromosomes o| 
behavior and importance of behavior in understanding evolution. P — Psycholog 

211. 

323. Animal Behavior. (4) A survey of laboratory and field research on anirm 
behavior. This course may count as biology or psychology but not both; choice to bj 
determined at registration. P — Permission of instructor. 

326. Learning Theory and Research. (3 or 4) Survey of concepts and research it 
learning, with particular emphasis on recent developments. P — Psychology 211. 

329. Perception. (4) Survey of theory and research findings on various sensor 
svstems (vision, hearing, touch, taste). P — Psychology 211. 

333. Motivation of Behavior. (3 or 4) Survey of basic motivational concepts anc 
related evidence. P — Psychology 211. 

335. Fundamentals of Human Motivation. (4) Description and analysis of some 
fundamental motivational phenomena, with special reference to human problems: 
includes reward and punishment, conflict anxiety, affection, needs for achievemenl 
and power, aggression, creativity, and curiosity. P — Psychology 151. 

341. Research in Child Development. (4) Methodological issues and selected re- 
search in child development. Research projects required. P — Psychology 211. 

343. Developmental Disorders. (2) Delayed or distorted neural development studied 
in relation to major disturbances of learning and behavior in children and in the 
aging. P — Psychology 211. 

344. Abnormal Psychology. (4) Descriptive analysis of the major types of abnormal 
behavior with attention to organic, psychological, and cultural causes and major 
modes of therapy. Offered in the summer. P — Psychology 151. 

347. Mental Retardation. (2) A brief overview of mental retardation covering current 
definitions, diagnostic procedures, primary known causal factors, and treatment 
procedures. Includes observational and/or practicum work in community centers. 
P — Psychology 211. 



127 



,'<1. Personality Research. (4) The application of a variety of research procedures to 
i : study of human personality. Research projects required. P — Psychology 211. 

Pp. Research in Social Psychology. (4) Methodological issues and selected research 
i the study of the human as a social animal. Research projects required. P — 
ychology 211. 

8. Psychology of Woman. (4) Intensive study of the behavior of women and its 
rsonal application, including consideration of biological, social, and motivational 
:tors. P — Psychology 151. 

1. Operant Conditioning and Behavior Modification. (4) Principles, theory, and 
perimental research in operant learning, with applications to the modification of 

c havior in various populations and situations, P — Psychology 211. 

2. Psychological Tests and Measurements. (4) Theory and application of psycho- 
ncal assessment procedures in the areas of intelligence, aptitude, vocational 

Merest, and personality. P — Psychology 211. 

3. Survey of Clinical Psychology. (3 or 4) An overview of the field of clinical 
lychology. P — Psychology 245 and senior standing or permission of instructor. 

>7. Effectiveness in Parent/Child Relations. (4) A survey of popular approaches to 
ild-rearing, with examination of the research literature on parent/child interaction 
d actual training in parental skills. P — Psychology 151. 

i9. Contemporary Applications of Psychology. (4) Supervised field experience in 
>plied psychology. P — Psychology 151 and permission of instructor. 

8. Instrumentation for Psychological Research. (2—4) Lecture/demonstration 
esentation of electrical and mechanical equipment, followed by practical applica- 
>n in small group project work. Assumes no prior knowledge of electricity or 
nstruction. P — Permission of instructor. 

Jl. Honors Seminar. (3) Seminar on selected problems in psychology. Intended 
imarily for students in the departmental honors program. P— Psychology 2 1 1 and 
'^mission of instructor. 




128 

383. Honors Research. (3) Seminar in selected issues in research design, followed! 
independent empirical research under the supervision of a member of the depl 
mental faculty. P — Psychology 212 and permission of instructor. 

390. Advanced Theory and Method. (4) Seminar in a selected area of psychologjl 
theory and research. P — Psychology 211. 

392. Contemporary Problems in Psychology. (4) Seminar treatment of curni( 
theory and research in several "frontier" areas of psychology. Principally for seni 
majors planning to attend graduate school. P — Psychology 21 1 and senior standi]. 



I 



Religion 

Emmett Willard Hamrick, Chairman 

Professors John William Angell, George McLeod Bryan, Robert Allen Dyer 

George J. Griffin, Emmett Willard Hamrick, Carlton T. Mitchell, 

Charles H. Talbert 

Associate Professors John E. Collins, Fred L. Horton Jr., Ralph C. Wood Jr 

Visiting Lecturer Thomas E. Dougherty Jr. 

The department offers courses designed to give every student an opportunity- 
acquire at least an introduction to the life, literature, and most important movemeu 
in the field of religion. It also seeks to give the students preparing for specializ 
service as religious education directors, ministers, and missionaries the foundatioi 
courses needed for further study. 

A course in religion is required for all degrees. Any course offered by the dep.i 
ment is accepted to meet the requirement except for 218, 225, 237, 239, 240, 1( : , 
266, 270, 273, 282, 286, 287, 292, and 346. 

A major in religion requires a minimum of thirty-two credits, at least half of whi< 
must be in courses above the 100-level. 

Pre-ministerial students are advised to include in their program of study, 
addition to courses in religion, courses in psychology, ancient history, public spea 
ing, and two languages (Greek or Latin and German or French). 

Highly qualified majors are invited by the department to apply for admission to tl 
honors program in religion. To be graduated with the designation "Honors 
Religion," they must apply to the chairman of the department for admission to tl 
honors program, normally by February of the junior year. Upon completion of all tl 
requirements the candidate is graduated with "Honors in Religion." For addition 
information members of the departmental faculty should be consulted. 

111. Introduction to the Old Testament. (4) A survey of the Old Testament designe 
to introduce the student to the history, literature, and religion of the ancier 
Hebrews. 

112. Introduction to the New Testament. (4) A survey of the literature of the Ne 
Testament in the context of early Christian history. 

113. The Hebrew Prophets. (4) A study of the background, personal characteristic 
function, message, contribution, and present significance of the Hebrew prophei 



129 

'4. The Wisdom Literature. (4) An introduction to the Wisdom Literature of the 
id Testament, with special attention to Proverbs. 

0. Introduction to the Bible. (4) A consideration of prominent themes found in the 
I'd and New Testaments. May be taken only by students who do not take Religion 

1 or 112. 

'1. Basic Christian Ethics. (4) The Biblical and theological foundation of the 
i' ristian ethic and its expression in selected contemporary problems. 

1. World Religions. (4) The place of religion in life and the origin, nature, and 
; :omplishments of the living religions of the world, studied from the historical point 
i view. 

4. History of Christianity. (4) A rapid survey of the history of the Christian 
' ; <*urcfi. 

: 5. American Religious Life. (4) A study of the history, organization, worship, and 
fiefs of American religious bodies, with particular attention to cultural factors. 

L 

1, 172. Meaning and Value in Western Thought. (4, 4) A critical survey of religion 
; d philosophy in the Western world from antiquity to modern times. Either Reli- 
j| >n 171 or 172 satisfies the philiosophy or religion requirement; both 171 and 172 
I'isfy both the philosophy and religion requirements; choice determined at registra- 
rs 



3. An Introduction to Christian Theology. (4) A study of the ground, structure, 
; c d content of Christian belief. 

'6. Theology and Modern Literature. (4) A study of modern literary artists whose 
i :mes are primarily theological, from Hopkins to Tolkien. 



! 0. Myth. (4) A study of the approaches to the interpretation of myth, with a focus 
Ij the meaning and values implicit in the myths of contemporary culture. 

Pi. Meaning of Religion. (4) A phenomenological study of different ways of 
< fining religion, including views of representative philosophers, psychologists, 
: :iologists, anthropologists, theologians, and historians of religion. 

' 2. Religious Ecstasy. (4) A phenomenological study of religious ecstasy and of the 
■thods by which it is obtained. Views of selected psychologists, sociologists, anthro- 
dogists, and historians of religion considered. 

• 4. Introduction to Biblical Archeology. (4) A survey of the contributions of Near 
stern archeology to Biblical studies. 

■ 1 5. Visions of the End: Jewish and Christian Apocalyptic. (4) Reading and study of 
ilical and non-Biblical apocalyptic texts. 

7. The Old Testament Apocrypha. (4) Reading of the books of the Apocrypha, 
h special attention to their origin and significance, and with a consideration of the 
ibivalence of Judaism and Christianity toward this literature. Pass/Fail. Usually 
?red in January. 



130 

218. Seminar in the Mediterranean World. (4) Travel and study in such countries 
Greece, Italy, Turkey, Egypt, Lebanon, Syria, and Israel. 

224. Jesus and the Synoptic Gospels. (4) A study of Jesus' proclamation and activ 
in the light of modern critical research on the Gospels. 

225. The Gospel Genre. (4) Consideration of the Apocryphal Gospels and of nc 
Christian writings that assist in answering the question, what is a gospel? Pass/f 
optional. 

236. Church and Community. (4) An examination of the basic needs and trends 
the contemporary community, especially the rural and suburban, in the light oft 
Christian norms for "the good community." 



237. Black Religion and Black Churches in America. (4) Survey of literature 
these themes with an examination of the historical background and special attenti' 
to the contemporary area. 

238. Religion and Science. (4) An analysis of the relationship between science ai 
religion in world culture. 

239. Ethical Value Systems in Confrontation, Conflict, and Creativity. (4) Exposu 
to Third World cultures by travel to Africa, Asia, or Latin America. Pass/Fail. Usua 
offered in January. 

240. Principles of Religious Education. (4) A study of the theory and practice 
religious education, with emphasis on the basic foundations in religion and educ 
tion. 

261. Judaism in the First Three Centuries of the Common Era. (4) A study of il 
development of Rabbinic Judaism out of the sects and movements of first centu 
Judaism. 

265. Religion in North Carolina. (4) A study of the major religious groups in Noi 
Carolina, with special emphasis upon their historical backgrounds. Visits to historic 
churches and other sites. Pass/Fail. Usually offered in January. 

266. Religious Sects and Cults. (4) An examination of certain religious sects 
America, including such groups as Jehovah's Witnesses, communal groups, an 
Black Muslims. Pass/Fail. Usually offered in January. 

270. Walker Percy. (4) A theological examination of his novels and essays, h 
Southern stoic background, and his use of European existentialism. 

273. Studies in Ecumenical Theology. (4) A study of the ecumenical moveme 
among Christians in the twentieth century, especially as related to the World Coun 
of Churches and the Vatican. The course involves visits to Geneva and Rom 
Pass/Fail. Usually offered in January. 

276. The Problem of Evil from Job to Shakespeare. (4) A comparative analysis 
the source and remedy of evil in Job, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Plato, Dante, ai 
Shakespeare. 



i 



131 

2'f. Christian Literary Classics. (4) A study of Christian texts which are master- 
p es of literature as well as faith, including works by Augustine, Dante. Pascal, 
B iyan, Milton, and Newman. 

21 . Honors in Religion. (4) A conference course including directed reading and the 
w ing of a research report. 

2:', 287. Directed Reading. ( 1-4, 1-4) A project in an area of study not otherwise 
a 1 lable in the department, permitted upon departmental approval of a petition 
p sented bv a qualified student. 

i% Teaching Religion. (4) A study of the teaching of religion in church, school, and 
Bimunity. This course may be credited as education for those who are applicants 
h a state teacher's certificate in religious education. 

3-!. Poetic Literature of the Old Testament. (4) A study of Hebrew poetry, its types, 
it iterary and rhetorical characteristics, and its significance in the faith of ancient 
I kel. 

3 ', 316. Field Research in Biblical Archeology. (4, 4) A study of the religion and 
c ure of the ancient Near East through the excavation and interpretation of an 
a ient site. 

3,'. The Ancient Near East. (4) A comparative study of ancient Near Eastern 
c :ures and religions, with special emphasis on Israel's relationships with surround- 
i: peoples. 

3 ... The Quest for the Historical Jesus. (4) An investigation of the possibility and 
T ?vance of historical knowledge about Jesus through a consideration of the seminal 
[" ves of Jesus" since the eighteenth century. 

3 !. The General Epistles. (4) An exegetical study of two or more of the general 
I sties, with emphasis on the setting of the epistles in the life of the Early Church. 

I >. Early Christian Theologians: Paul. (4) An introduction to the Pauline interpre- 
t on of Christianity and its place in the life of the Early Church. 

I 1. Early Christian Theologians: The Fourth Evangelist. (4) An examination of the 
J lannine interpretation of Jesus and Christian faith. 

mi,. Religion and the Social Crisis. (4) An interdisciplinary approach to the study of 
s iety today, with particular attention to views of human nature and social institu- 
k is as reflected in religion, the social sciences, and related disciplines. 

I 1. Christian Ethics and Contemporary Culture. (4) A study of the encounter 
1 ween the Christian ethic and the value systems implicit in social areas such as 
e nomics, politics, race, and sex. 

ni. Theological Foundations of Religious Education. (4) A study of theological 
I thodology, theories of learning, and philosophies of education in terms of their 
i plications for religious education. 

> ). Psychology of Religion. (4) An examination of the psychological elements in the 
< gin, development, and expression of religious experience. 



132 

354. Religious Development of the Individual. (4) A study of growth and develo 
ment through childhood and adolescence to adulthood, with emphasis on the role 
the home and the church in religious education. 

355. Theology of Pastoral Care and Counseling. (4) A study of the relationsh 
between theology and the purpose, theories, and methods of pastoral care. P- 
Permission of instructor. 

360. Hinduism. (4) A study of the fundamental features of the Hindu tradition 

361. Buddhism. (4) A study of the Buddhist tradition, its fundamental features, ar 
its impact on the culture of Asia. 

363. Hellenistic Religions. (4) Consideration of available source materials, questioi 
of method, and bibliography related to such Hellenistic religions as the mysterit 
Hellenistic Judaism, and Gnosticism. 

364. Islam. (4) A studv of the fundamental concepts of Islamic thought and il 
historical context of its development. Both the ancient and contemporary impact 
the teachings of Islam considered. 

365. History of Religions in America. (4) A study of American religions froi 
colonial times until the present. 

373. History of Christian Thought. (4) A study of the history of Christian though 
beginning with its Hebraic and Greek backgrounds and tracing its rise and develo| 
ment to modern times. 

.... 

374. Contemporary Christian Thought. (4) An examination of the major issues an 

personalities in modern theology. 

376. The Origins of Existentialism. (4) A study of the principal nineteenth centut 
figures who form the background for twentieth century existentialism: Goethi 
Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Dostoevskv, and Tolstoy. 

i 
Hebrew 

111, 112. Elementary Hebrew. (4, 4) A course for beginners in the classical Hebrc 
of the Bible, with emphasis on the principles of Hebrew grammar and the reading c 
Bibical texts. Both semesters must be completed. 

153. Intermediate Hebrew. (4) Intensive work in Hebrew grammar and syntax base 
upon the readings of selected texts. Readings emphasize post-Biblical Hebrew 
P — Hebrew 111, 1 12, or the equivalent. 

211. Hebrew Literature. (4) The reading and discussion of significant Biblic? 
Hebrew texts. P — Hebrew 153. 

212. Hebrew Literature II. (4) The reading and discussion of significant Biblical aiu 
post-Biblical texts. Offered on demand. P — Hebrew 153. 

301. Introduction to Semitic Linguistics. (4) In each of the four weeks the histor 
and structure of one of the languages from the Hamito-Semitic family of language 
are studied. Usually offered in January. 



133 

Romance Languages 

Mary Frances Robinson, Chairman 
Professor of Humanities Germaine Bree 
Professors Shasta M. Bryant, Harry L King Jr., John E. Parker Jr., 
Mary Frances Robinson, Richard L. Shoemaker, Anne S. Tillett 
sociate Professors Doranne Fenoaltea, Kathleen Glenn, Gregorio C. Martin, 
Assistant Professors Milorad R. Margitic, Blanche C. Speer 
Lecturers Bianca Artom, Eva Marie Rodtwitt 
Instructors Julian Bueno, Frances Creighton, Ruth M. Mesavage, 
i Candelas M. Newton, Anna- Vera Sullam (Venice), 

i Sylvia Trelles, Frank H. Whitchurch 

lie major in French requires a minimum of thirty-six credits, at least twenty-four 
•■which must be in literature. French 219 and 221 or their equivalents are required; 
r tory 321 and 322 are recommended. An average of at least C must be earned in all 
c, rses taken in the major. 

"he major in Spanish requires a minimum of thirty-six credits, at least twenty of 
v ich are normally in the literature of Spain and Spanish America. Spanish 219 and 
¥ or their equivalents are required; Spanish 223 and 224 and eight credits chosen 
fm 225, 226, and 227 are recommended. Spanish 173, 181, 1827, and 187 may not 
c int toward the major. An average of at least C must be earned in all courses taken in 
t^ major. 

v joint major is offered in French and Spanish, consisting of fifty-six credits in the 
t r > languages and literatures, excluding elementary language. Required courses for 
lis major are French 153x, 2 16, 2 17, 219, 22 1 , and 224; Spainish 153x, either 215 or 
|j), 2 19, 22 1 , either 223 or 224, and eight credits from 225 through 227. Equivalents 
r y be substituted. An average of at least C must be earned in all courses taken in the 
i jor. 

Ml majors are strongly urged to take advantage of the department's study abroad 
{ )grams and to live for at least a semester at one of the foreign language residence 
caters at the Graylyn Estate. 

"4ighly qualified majors are invited by the department to apply for admission to the 
1 aors program in French or Spanish. To be graduated with the designation "Hon- 
c° in Romance Languages," a candidate must complete French or Spanish 280 and 
' 3 l and pass a comprehensive written and oral examination. The oral examination 
i; y be conducted, at least in part, in the major language. For additional information 
i mbers of the departmental faculty should be consulted. 

1. Self-Instructional Language. (4) A self-instructional language course covering 
' : principles of grammar and pronunciation in one of the less commonly taught 

iguages, such as Japanese, Swedish, Arabic, or Thai. Individual self-instruction in 
' ; language of the student's choice through the use of recorded material and 

tbooks. Admission by petition to the Foreign Language Placement Review Com- 

ttee. Elective credit only; does not satisfy basic or divisional course requirements. 



134 

French 

111, 112. Elementary French. (4, 4) A course for beginners, covering the princip 
of French grammar and emphasizing speaking, writing, and the reading of elem 
tary texts. Lab required. 

113. Intensive Elementary French. (5) A one-semester course covering the elemer 
of grammar and skills presented in French 111, 112. Intended for students whc 
preparation for French 153 is inadequate. Not open to students who have receive 
credit for French 112. Lab required. 

153. Intermediate French. (5) A review of grammar and composition with practice 
conversation. Reading of selected texts. Lab required. P — French 111, 112, 1 13, 
two years of high school French. 

153x. Intermediate French. (4) Open to students by placement or permission. Li 
required. 

164. A Classic in Comedy. (2—4) Participants plan and present a production of 
French comedy. The play is rehearsed and performed in French; students at 
involved in all aspects of production. P — Permission of instructor. 

181. Swiss French Civilization. (4) The course is designed to acquaint the studer 
with the Swiss people and their civilization through living for a few weeks wit 
families. Visits are made to points of cultural interest, historical, literary, and artist i 
A journal and a paper describing in detail some aspect of Swiss French civilizatioi 
both in French, are required. Offered in January. 

1 85. Paris, Cultural Center of France. (4) A study of Paris monuments on location t 
explore the development of the city as capital and cultural center of France. N 
prerequisites. Usually offered in the summer. 

187. France in January. (4) The course is designed to acquaint students with Freno 
people and their civilization through living for a few weeks with families. Visits ar 
made to points of cultural interest. Offered in January. P — French 153 or permission o 
instructor. 

199. French Individual Study. (2—4) P — Permission of the department. 

213. Masterpieces of French Literature I. (4) Reading of selected texts in French 
Particular periods, genres, and authors may vary from section to section. Paralle 
reading and reports. Only one course in masterpieces may count toward the major 
but either may satisfy the basic or divisional requirement. P — French 153 or equiva 
lent. 

214. Masterpieces of French Literature II. (4) Reading of selected texts in French 
Particular periods, genres, and authors may vary from section to section. Paralle 
reading and reports. Only one course in masterpieces may count toward the major 
but either mav satisfy the basic or divisional requirement. P — French 153 or equiva 
lent. 

216. Survey of French Literature from the Middle Ages through the Eighteenth 
Century. (4) Study of selected texts, parallel reading, and study of trends and 
movements. Taught largely in French. P — French 153 or permission of instructor 



135 



2 . Survey of French Literature of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries. (4) 

Sdy of selected texts, parallel reading, and study of trends and movements. Taught 
l;' r ely in French. P — French 153 or permission of instructor. 

2 i. Composition and Review of Grammar. (4) A systematic review of the fun- 

1 nental principles of comparative grammar, with practical training in writing 
i(>matic French. Required for major. P — French 153 or equivalent. 

2, . Conversation and Composition. (4) Practice in speaking and writing French, 
s ssing correctness of sentence structure, phonetics, pronunciation, fluency, and 
v abulary for everyday situations. Required for major. Lab required. P — French 
■1 ' > or equivalent. 

2 :. French Civilization. (4) An introduction to French culture and its historical 

1 elopment. Emphasis on intellectual, artistic, political, social, and economic life of 
F nee. Taught in French. P — French 221 or permission of instructor. 

IT. History of French Civilization. (2) An introduction to the historical develop- 
n lit of French culture, including consideration of its intellectual, artistic, and 
p ideal heritage. Taught in French. P — French 221 or permission of instructor. 

2 . Contemporary France. (2) A study of present-day France, including aspects of 
g graphy and consideration of social, political, and educational factors in French 
li today. Taught in French. P — French 221 or permission of instructor. 

2,. Business French. (4) A study of French used in business procedures, empha- 
si lg specialized vocabulary pertaining to business correspondence, corporate orga- 
n ition, banking, and governmental relations, with practice in translation and 
ir rpretations, oral and written. P — French 2 19 and 221 or permission of instructor. 

2 . Medieval French Literature. (2—4) A survey of French literature of the Middle 
A. ?s with cultural and political backgrounds. Selected masterpieces in original form 
a r modern transcription. P — French 216 or 217 or permission of instructor. 

2|. Sixteenth Century French Literature. (4) The literature and thought of the 
R laissance in France, with particular emphasis on the works of Rabelais, 
N* itaigne, and the major poets of the age. P — French 216 or 217 or permission of 
ir iructor. 

m. Seventeenth Century French Literature. (4) A study of the outstanding writers 
o ; he Classical Age. P — French 216 or 217 or permission of instructor. 

2 . Seminar in Seventeenth Century French Literature. (4) A study of selected 
t( ;cs of the period. Topics may vary from year to year. P — French 216 or 217 or 
p mission of instructor. 

2 . Eighteenth Century French Literature. (2-4) A survey of French literature of 
tl eighteenth century with cultural and political backgrounds. P — French 216 or 
p mission of instructor. 

2 . Seminar in Eighteenth Century French Literature. (2-4) Study of selected 
t< ics of the period. Topics vary from year to year. P — French 216 or 217 or 
p mission of instructor. 



136 



261. Nineteenth Century French Literature. (4) A study of French literature oM* 
nineteenth century with cultural and political backgrounds. P — French 2 16 or 2 , on - 
permission of instructor. 

262. Seminar in Nineteenth Century French Literature. (4) Study of selected t< 
of the period. Topics vary from year to year. P — French 216 or 21 7 or permissicl 
instructor. 

263. Trends in French Poetry. (4) A study of the development of the poetic g<j 
with analysis and interpretation of works from each period. P — French 216 or 2 1^ 
permission of instructor. 

264. French Novel. (4) A broad survey of French prose fiction, with critical studi 
several masterpieces in the Field. P — French 21(5 or 217 or permission of instrut 

265. French Drama. (4) A study of the chief trends in French dramatic art, 1 
leading and discussion of representative plays. P — French 216 or 217 or permisj 
of instructor. 

271. Twentieth Century French Literature. (4) A study of general trends ; 
representative works of the foremost prose writers, dramatists, and poets. P — Fre 
216 or 217 or permission of instructor. 

272. Seminar in Twentieth Century French Literature. (4) Study of selected topic 
the period. Topics vary from year to year. P — Fiench 216 or 217 or permission 
instructor. 

280. Directed Research. (2) Required for honors in French. 

281. Directed Study. (3, 4) Extensive reading and/or research to meet individ 
needs. Required for departmental honors. P — Permission of the department. 

371. Surrealism. (4) Origins, theories, evolution, and impact. This course examii 
the interconnections between Surrealist poetry and painting and the works of B 
ton, Fluard, and Aragon. Conducted in French. P — French 221 or equivalent. 

372. Proust. (4) Study of substantial portions of Proust's A la Recherche du temps pert 
its themes, and their significance in historical and aesthetic context. Conducted 
French. P — French 221 or equivalent. 

373. French Images of America. (4) A study of French points of view through i 
reading of texts beginning with Tocqueville and ending with Michel Butor's Mobi 
4 he course attempts to relate them to a variety of circumstances and influenc< 
political, sociological, and cultural. Conducted in French. P — French 221 or equiv 
lent. 

Semester in France 

The department sponsors a semester in France in Dijon, the site of a well esta 
lished French university. Students go as group in the fall semester, accompanied b\ 
departmental faculty member. 

No particular major is required for eligibility. However, a student ( I ) should be( 
junior standing and (2) should have taken a prerequisite French 22 1 or its equivalei 
or at least one French course beyond the intermediate level. 



I 



137 

lci Students are placed in language courses according to their level of ability in French, 
"''[ascertained by a test given at Dijon. Courses are taught by native French professors, 
e resident director supervises academic, residential, and extracurricular affairs 
IfjJJd has general oversight of independent study projects. 

si«J2. Advanced Oral and Written French. (2—4) Study of grammar, composition, 
|j munciation, and phonetics, with extensive practice in oral and written French. 

w$2. Contemporary France. (4) A study of present-day France, including aspects of 
0I '2| pgraphy and consideration of social, political, and educational factors in French 
I ■ todav. 



!>92. French Civilization. (2-4) An introduction to French culture and its historical 
'nliVelopment. Field trips to museums and to points of historical and cultural signifi- 
, < ice in Paris and in the French provinces. 

!'02. Independent Study. (2—4) One of several fields; scholar's journal and research 

] per. Supervision by the director of the semester in France and evaluation by the 

i, cpartment for which credit is granted. Work may be supplemented by lectures on 

pAe subject given at the Universite de Dijon Faculte des Lettres et Sciences Humaines. 

! 52. French Literature. (2) The novel, theatre, and poetry of France, largely of the 
. :riod since 1950. 

'62. Literary Pilgrimage. (2—4) Reading of selected French texts, with visits to sites 
ving literary associations. A study of the relationship between milieux and works, 
lught in French-speaking countries. 

Jt 2712. Studies in French Art. (2) Lectures and field trips in French painting, 

ilpture, and architecture, concentrating on the eighteenth and nineteenth cen- 

ries. 
i 
jistory 2262. The Golden Age of Burgundy. (2) Bui gundian society, culture, and 

vernment in the reigns of Philip the Bold, John the Fearless, Philip the Good, and 

f carles the Rash, 1384-1477. 

Spanish 

.1, 112. Elementary Spanish. (4, 4) A course for beginners covering grammar 
sentials and emphasizing speaking, writing, and the reading of elementary texts, 
ib required. 

3. Intensive Elementary Spanish. (5) A one-semester course covering the elements 
grammar and skills presented in Spanish 111, 112. Intended for students whose 
eparation for Spanish 153 is inadequate or who have demonstrated proficiency in 
other language. Not open to students who have received credit for Spanish 1 12. 
lib required. 

>3. Intermediate Spanish. (5) A review of grammar and composition with practice 
conversation. Reading of selected texts. P — Two years of high school Spanish or 
uivalent. Lab required. 

>3x. Intermediate Spanish. (4) Open by placement or permission. Lab required. 



138 

161. The Spanish Romancero. (4) Study of the importance of the romancero in if I 
literature and life of Spain, focusing on the older hallads of the Middle Ages id 
Renaissance. Offered in January. 

162. A Panorama of Drama. (4) A brief sampling of Spanish drama from its el 
period to the contemporary theatre, studying in Spanish representative works i i m 
each major period. Approximately six plays. The class selects one play to presen 
Spanish, with students having directing and acting responsibilities. Offered injanul 

171. Contemporary Spanish American Novel. (4) A detailed study of a novel 
Spanish by each of five or six outstanding contemporary Spanish American noveli 
such as Julio Cortazar, Carlos Fuentes, and Gabriel Garcia Marquez. Offered} 
January. 

173. The Mexican Novel in Translation since 1915. (4) A study of the Mexin 
Revolution of 1910 — 19 18 as seen through the eyes of authors contemporary with l 
events they describe and of those who wrote in its aftermath: Azuela, Guzman, a; 
Yanez; Rulfo and Fuentes. Pass/Fail. Usually offered in January. 

181. Colombia: Study Tour of Bucaramanga, Cali, and Medellin. (4) Travel 
Colombia and residence in one of its major cities in homes of private families fo 
period of three weeks. Students receive instruction in spoken Spanish and 
Colombian literature and anthropology and political, social, or economic histo 
Offered in January. 

187. Culture and Language. (4) A study of Spanish culture and language, tailored 
various levels of student ability. Taught only in the Spanish world. Does not cou 
toward the major. 

199. Individual Study. (2—4) P — Permission of the department. 

214. Introduction to Hispanic Literature. (4) Selected readings in Spanish an 
Spanish American literature. Designed as a substitute for either Spanish 215 or 211 
Offered in the summer. P — Spanish 153 or equivalent. 

215. Major Spanish Writers. (4) Reading of selected texts. P — Spanish 153orequiv. 
lent. 

216. Major Spanish American Writers. (4) Reading of selected texts. P — Spanish 15 
or equivalent. 

219. Advanced Grammar and Composition. (4) A systematic review of the fur 
damental principles of comparative grammar, with practical training in writin 
idiomatic Spanish. Lab required. P — Spanish 153 or equivalent. 

221. Conversation and Composition. (4) Practice in speaking and writing Spanisl 
stressing correctness of sentence structure, phonetics, pronunciation, fluency, an 
vocabulary of everyday situations. Lab required. P — Spanish 153 or equivalent. 

223. Latin American Civilization. (4) The culture and its historical development 
emphasis on intellectual, artistic, political, social, and economic life. P — Spanish 15? 
or 216. 



139 

4. Spanish Civilization. (4) The culture and its historical development; emphasis 
si, intellectual, artistic, political, social, and economic life. P — Spanish 215 or 216. 

5. Survey of Spanish Literature from the Middle Ages through the Seventeenth 
sntury. (4) Extensive reading and study of trends and influences. P — Spanish 215 

216. 

1,1 6. Survey of Spanish Literature from the Eighteenth Century to the Present. (4) 

'Intensive reading and study of trends and movements. P — Spanish 215 or 216. 

1 ' 7. Survey of Spanish American Literature. (4) Extensive reading and study of 
! '!>rks from the colonial through the contemporary periods, with emphasis on the late 
'neteenth and twentieth centuries. P — Spanish 215 or 216. 

9. Commercial, Official, and Social Correspondence. (4) Instruction in the special 
'cabularies, formats, and styles required in written and telegraphic communica- 
''»ns. Students write in Spanish communications appropriate to each tvpe of corres- 
pondence. P — Spanish 215 or permission of instructor. 



>4. Spanish Prose Fiction before Cervantes. (4) A study of the several types of prose 
;tion, such as the sentimental, chivalric, pastoral, Moorish, and picaresque novels, 
, ior to 1605. P — Spanish 215 or 216. 

j:1. Golden Age Drama. (4) A study of the major dramatic works of Lope de Vega, 
dderon de la Barca, Tirso de Molina, Ruiz de Alarcon, and others. P — Spanish 215 
216. 

:3. Cervantes. (4) Intensive study of the life and works of Cervantes, with special 
riphasis on the Quixote and the novelas ejemplares. P — Spanish 215 or 216. 

A. Seminar in Cervantes. (2—4) A study of special aspects of Cervantes' works, such 
the novelas ejemplares and his dramatic works. P — Spanish 215 or 216. 

'2. Seminar in Hispanic Poetry. (2—4) A study of selected topics, such as gonogoris- 
md, the romancero, and the Generation of 1927. P — Spanish 215 or 216. 

yl. Nineteenth Century Spanish Novel. (4) A studv of the novels of Valera, Pereda, 
ildos, Pardo Bazan, Blasco Ibanex, and their contemporaries. P — Spanish 215 or 
,6. 

»5. Spanish American Novel. (4) A studv of the novel in Spanish American from its 
'ginning through the contemporary period. P — Spanish 215 or 216. 

>6. Seminar in Spanish American Novel. (4) A study of one or more categories of 
vanish American novels, such as romantic, indianista, realistic, gauchesca, and social 
otest. P — Spanish 215 or 216. 

!| 

•9. Nineteenth Century Spanish Drama. (4) A study of the principal dramatic 
)rks from neoclassicism to the end of the century. P — Spanish 215 or 2 Hi. 

r l. Modern Spanish Drama. (4) A studv of the principal dramatic works from the 
id of the nineteenth century through the contemporary period. P — Spanish 215 or 
6. 



140 



- 



273. Modern Spanish Novel. (4) A study of representative Spanish novels from tl 
Generation of 1898 through the contemporary period. P — Spanish 215 or 216. 

274. Seminar in Modern Spanish Literature. (2-4) An analysis of selected wor! 
representative of such movements as costumbrismo, realism, naturalism, and tl 
contemporary social novel. P — Spanish 215 or 216. 

280. Directed Research. (2) Required for honors in Spanish. 

281. Directed Study. (3—4) Extensive reading and/or research, to meet individu 
needs. Required for departmental honors. P — Permission of the department. 

Semester in Spain 

The department offers a semester in Spain at Salamanca, the site of a well est.il 
lished Spanish university. Students go as a group in the spring semester, accon 
panied by a professor from the College. 

No particular major is required for eligibility. However, a student ( 1 ) should be d 
junior standing, (2) should have completed intermediate Spanish or its equivalent 
and (3) should be approved by both the major department and the Department o 
Romance Languages. A course in Spanish conversation is also recommended. 

1829. Introduction to Spain. (2 — 1) Familiarization with the Spanish people, Spanisl 
culture, and daily life in Spain. (Masses in conversational and idiomatic Spanish 
excursions to points of historical and artistic interest, and lectures on selected topi< s 

2049. Spanish Phonetics and Phonology. (4) Theory and practical application of tin 
elements involved in speaking correct Spanish. 

2059. History of the Spanish Language. (4) Evolution and historical development o 
the Spanish language, including regional dialects and present-dav variations in th< 
spoken and written form. 

2419. Spanish Literature of the Golden Age. (4) A survey of the most importani 
authors and genres of the Golden Age, with particular emphasis on the novel and tin 
drama. 

2539. Contemporary Spanish Poetry. (4) Survey of the most important poets and) 
poetic movements of the contemporary period. 

Sociology 2029. Social-Political Structures of Present-Day Spain. (4) A study of the 
various social and political elements which affect the modern Spanish state. 

History 2019. General History of Spain. (4) History of Spain from the pre-Romati 
period to the present day. 

Art 2029. Spanish Art and Architecture. (4) A study of the development and 
uniqueness of Spanish art and architecture within the framework of Mediterranean 
and Western art in general. 

Chinese 

111, 112. Elementary Chinese. (4, 4) Emphasis on the development of listening and 
speaking skills in Mandarin. Brief introduction to the writing system. Basic sentence 
patterns covered. Lab required. 



141 



19. Individual Study. (2—4) P — Permision of the department. 

Hindi 

1, 112. Elementary Hindi. (4, 4) Attention given mainly to basic Hindi grammar, 
icabulary-building, simple composition, and conversation. Lab required. 

13. Intermediate Hindi. (4) Advanced practice in Hindi composition and conversa- 
>n and introduction to literary Hindi. Lab required. P — Hindi 111, 112, or the 
|uivalent. 

11. Hindi Literature. (4) Reading and translation of selected texts in prose and 
)etry and journalistic Hindi. Lab required. P — Hindi 153. 

Italian 

13. Elementary Italian. (5) Intensive course for beginners, emphasizing the struc- 
, re of the language and oral practice. Recommended for students in the Venice 
ogram and for language majors. Lab required. Lecture — five hours. Offered every 
jmester. 

>3. Intermediate Italian. (5) Continuation of 1 13, with emphasis on reading and 
peaking. Lab required. Lecture — five hours. P — Italian 113 or two years of high 
hool Italian. 

53x. Intermediate Italian. (4) Open by placement or permission. Lab required. 

99. Individual Study. (2—4) P — Permission of instructor. 

15. Introduction to Italian Literature I. (4) Reading of selected texts in Italian, 
itisfies basic requirement in foreign language. Offered in the spring. P — Italian 153 or 
mivalent. 

16. Introduction to Italian Literature II. (4) May alternate with 215. Satisfies basic 
?quirement in foreign language. P — Italian 153 or equivalent. 

Semester in Venice 

"213. Spoken Italian. (4) Course in oral Italian, offered only in Venice. Students are 
laced in small groups according to their levels of fluency. Elective credit. 
J 

Norwegian 

90, 191. Norwegian. (4, 4) Independent study of the language and directed reading 
f texts in Norwegian. Primarily for students specializing in foreign languages. 

i 

Russian 

11, 112. Elementary Russian. (4, 4) The essentials of Russian grammar, conversa- 
onal drill, and reading of elementary texts. Lab required. P — Permission of in- 
ductor. 

53. Intermediate Russian. (5) Training in principles of translation with grammar 
eview and conversation practice. Lab required. P — Russian 1 12 or equivalent. 



142 

153x. Intermediate Russian. (4) Open by placement or permission. Lab require* 
165. Solzhenitsyn: The Politics of Literature. (4) Reading and discussion of all tl 
works of Solzhenitsyn available in English. One long paper. Offered in January, 

215. Introduction to Russian Literature. (4) Reading of edited texts from \\ 
nineteenth century. P — Russian 153 or equivalent. 

216. Introduction to Russian Literature. (4) Reading of edited texts from tl 
twentieth century. P — Russian 153 or equivalent. 

217. Seminar in Nineteenth Century Russian Literature. (4) A study of the foremo. 
writers, with reading of representative works. P — Russian 153 or equivalent. 

218. Seminar in Contemporary Russian Literature. (4) Reading of representath 
works in Russian with discussion of political and cultural backgrounds. P — Russia 
153 or equivalent. 

Sociology 

Philip J. Perricone, Chairman 

Professor John R. Earle 

Associate Professors William H. Gulley, Philip J. Perricone 

Visiting Assistant Professors Patrick W. Conover, James D. Walter 

A major in sociology requires thirty-six credits and must include Sociology 151 
371, and 372. A minimum average of 2.0 in sociology courses is required at the timi 
the major is declared. A minimum grade point average of 2.0 in all sociology course 
is required for graduation. 

To be graduated with the designation "Honors in Sociology," highly qualifief 
majors are invited to apply to the department for admission to the honors program 
They must complete a senior research project, document their research, and satisfac 
torily defend their work in an oral examination. For additional information member 
of the departmental faculty should be consulted. 

151. Principles of Sociology. (3 or 4) General introduction to the field; socia 
organization and disorganization, socialization, culture, social change, and othei 
aspects. 

152. Social Problems. (3 or 4) Survey of contemporary American social problems 
P — Sociologv 151. 

205. Photography in the Social Sciences. (3 or 4) Explores the use of photography a; 
a research technique for the social sciences; camera and darkroom instruction in 
eluded. Usually offered in January. P — Permission of instructor. 

248. Marriage and the Family. (3 or 4) The social basis of the family, emphasizing thef 
problems growing out of modern conditions and social change. 

301. Religion as a Social Institution. (3) A cross-cultural study of religious organiza 
tions; cults, and sects. Examination of the forms of organization and their relation 
ship to other social factors. Usually offered in January. P— Sociology 151. 



143 



)5. Male and Female Roles in Society. (3 or 4) Changing male and female roles in 
le context of societal institutions and sociological theories that explain such changes, 
consideration of feminism as a social movement and of consequences of changing 
>les for human interaction. P — Sociology 151. 

10. Death and Dying. (3) Study of some of the basic issues and problems of modern 
an in accepting and facing death. Offered in January. P — Permission of instructor. 

15. Self and Society: An Interactionist Perspective. (3 or 4) An analysis of the 
fects of social relationships upon self-development, self-presentation, and the 
'arning of social roles and norms, with special emphasis on language and symbolic 
;teraction. P — Sociology 151. 

33. The Urban Community. (3 or 4) A survev of materials relating to the communitv 
'<'; a unit of sociological investigation, with emphasis on the urban setting. Of particu- 
r value for social work or community planning. P — Sociology 151. 

35. Medical Sociology. (3 or 4) Analysis of the social variables associated with health 
id illness and with the practice of medicine. P — Sociology 151. 

37. Aging in Modern Society. (3 or 4) Basic social problems and processes of aging. 
Dcial and psychological issues discussed. P — Sociology 151. 

40. Sociology of Child Development. (3 or 4) Socialization through adolescence in 
le light of contemporary behavioral science, emphasizing the significance of social 
ructure. P — Sociology 151. 

41. Criminology. (3 or 4) Crime, its nature, causes, consequences, methods of 
i-eatment, and prevention. P — Sociology 151. 

42. Juvenile Delinquency. (3 or 4) The nature and extent of juvenile delinquency; 
No examination of prevention, control, and treatment programs. P — Sociology 151 
'id permission of instructor. 

43. Sociology of Law. (3 or 4) Consideration will be given to a variety of special 
sues: conditions under which laws develop and change, relationships between the 
gal and political system, the impact of social class and stratification upon the legal 

rrder. Usually offered in January. P — Sociology 151 or permission of instructor. 

i 

44. The Sociology of Deviant Behavior. (3 or 4) A sociological analysis of the nature 
id causes of and societal reaction to deviant behavior patterns such as mental illness, 

;iicide, drug and alcohol addiction, sexual deviation, and criminal behavior. P — 
Dciology 151. 

46. Seminar on Social Utopias. (3 or 4) Survey of major Utopian literature; em- 
ihasis is placed upon both the social organization in Utopian proposals and their 
nplicit critique of current society and social ideologies. P — Sociology 151. 

147. Society, Culture, and Sport. (3 or 4) An examination of the interrelationship of 
)ort and other social institutions. Emphasis on the study of both the structure of 
: x>rt and the functions of sport for society. P — Sociology 151. 

58. Population and Society. (3 or 4) Techniques used in the study of population 
ata. Reciprocal relationship of social and demographic variables. P — Sociology 151. 



144 






359. Race and Ethnic Relations. (3 or 4) Racial and ethnic group prejudice anc 
discrimination and their effect on social relationships. Emphasis on psvchologica 
and sociological theories of prejudice. P — Sociology 151. 

360. Social Stratification. (3 or 4) The study of structured social inequality with d 
particular emphasis on economic class, social status, and political power. P— 
Sociology 151. 

365. Dependency Needs and Social Services. (3 or 4) Examination of various formjjj 

of dependency, such as social, economic, emotional, and physical, and communiti 
social agencies designed to meet these needs. Use of relevant literature, field expei i 
ence, and resource persons. 

371, 372. The Sociological Perspective. (4,4) A two-semester course dealing with the 
development and application of major theories and research methods in sociology. A 
continuing effort is made to enable the student to deal with current theoretically 
oriented research. P — Sociology 151 and permission of instructor. 

380. Social Statistics. (3 or 4) Basic statistics, emphasizing application in survey 
research. (A student who receives credit for this course may not also receive credit for 
Biology 248, Business 201, Mathematics 157, or Anthropology 380.) 

385, 386. Special Problems Seminar. (3 or 4) Intensive investigation of current 
scientific research within the discipline which concentrates on problems ol "contem- 
porary interest. P — Permission of instructor. 

398, 399. Individual Study. (1—4, 1—4) Reading research, or internship course 
designed to meet the needs and interests of selected students, to be carried out under 
the supervision of a departmental faculty member. 

Speech Communication and Theatre Arts 

Donald H. Wolfe, Chairman 

Professors Julian C. Burroughs Jr., Franklin R. Shirley, David H. Welker 

Associate Professors Harold C. Tedford, Donald H. Wolfe 

Assistant Professor Michael D. Hazen 

Visiting Assistant Professor Jo Whitten May 

Visiting Lecturer James H. Dodding 

Instructors Caroline S. Fullerton, Allan D. Louden 

Laura V. Rouzan 

For convenience in advising majors, the department divides the study of speech 
communication and theatre arts into the following fields: (1) communication theory, 
(2) rhetoric/public address, (3) radio/television/film, (4) theatre arts, and (5) speech 
pathology/correction. It is possible for a student either to concentrate in one of the 
first four fields or to take courses across the breadth of the discipline. Specific courses 
of study are worked out in consultation with departmental faculty members. 

A major in speech communication and theatre arts consists of a minimum of forty 
credits, at least eight of which must be at the 300-level. I n order for a course to count 
toward a student's major, the student must earn a grade of C or higher in the course. 



■ 



145 

Those students majoring in speech education and theatre arts education are 
upected to take specific courses which meet the requirements for teacher certifica- 
l n. Information concerning the courses may be obtained from departmental facul- 
t,members. 

iHighly qualified majors are invited by the department to apply for admission to the 
] nors program in speech communication and theatre arts. To be graduated with the 
( Agnation "Honors in Speech Communication and Theatre Arts," they must suc- 
I sfully complete 281. For additional information members of the departmental 
fulty should be consulted. 

3 

\ D. Special Seminar. (4) The intensive study of selected topics in communication, 
pics may be drawn from any theory or concept area of communication, such as 
rVsuasion, organizational communication, film, or theatre. 

■ 1. Honors in Speech Communication and Theatre Arts. (4) A conference course 
i olving intensive work in the area of special interest for selected seniors who wish to 
j iduate with departmental honors. 

J 2. Individual Study. (4) Special research and readings in a choice of interest to be 
; proved and supervised by a faculty adviser. 

L3, 284. Debate, Radio/Television/Film, or Theatre Arts Practicum. (2, 2) Indi- 
I ual projects in the student's choice of debate, radio/television/film, or theatre arts; 
i ludes organizational meetings, faculty supervision, and faculty evaluation. No 
s dent may register for more than two credits of practicum in any semester. No 
rdent is allowed to take more than a total of eight credit units in practicum, only 
i ir credits of which may be counted toward a major in speech communication and 
t atre arts. Pass/Fail only. 

Communication/Public Address 

11. Public Speaking I. (4) A study of the nature and fundamentals of speech 
( nmunication. Practice in the preparation and delivery of short speeches. 

] I. Public Speaking II. (4) The preparation and presentation of short speeches to 
i orm, convince, actuate, and entertain. P — Speech Communication 151. 

1 5. Interpersonal Communication. (4) The course is divided into three parts: 
cinmunication theory, person-to-person communication, and small group inter- 
I ion. 

1 ». Group Communication. (4) An introduction to the principles of discussion and 
liberation in small groups, with practice in group problem-solving and discussion 
1 dership. 

1 >. Oral Interpretation of Literature. (4) Fundamentals of reading aloud, with 
t phasis on selection, analysis, and performance. 

1 I. Voice and Diction. (4) A study of the principles of voice and production, with 
t j phasis on phonetics as a basis for correct sound formation. 

5 i. Persuasion. (4) A study of the variables and contexts of persuasion in contem- 
I ary society. 



146 

252. Argumentation and Debate. (4) A study of the principles of argumentatioi 
practical experience in researching and debating a public policy question. 

253. The Rhetoric of Western Thought. (4) A survey of the major theories in rhetor 
from Plato to Burke, with emphasis on rhetorical criticism. Students apply trj 
historical/critical method to the rhetoric of contemporary movements. 

261. Clinical Management of Speech and Language Disorders. (4) Methods used t 
correct speech disorders of voice, rhythm, language, and articulation; observation ( 
methods used with selected cases in clinical or public school settings. Offered i 
alternate fall semesters. 

262. Audiology. (4) Clinical audiology, including anatomy, physiology, disorders < 
the hearing mechanism, and interpretations of basic measurements of auditoi 
function. Offered in alternate spring semesters. 

263. Speech and Language Disorders I. (4) Study of the disorders of languasji 
articulation, and rhythm, with special emphasis on functional disorders; focus is o 
the role the therapist plays in assisting the speech-handicapped child. Offered i 
alternate fall semesters. 

264. Speech and Language Disorders II. (4) Consideration of etiology and sympton 
of speech and language problems due to organic disorders of voice, articulatioi 
language, and hearing. Offered in alternate spring semesters. 

271. Communication Theory. (4) An introduction to theory-building in communic; 
tion and to the major contemporary theorists in the field. P — Speech Communicatio, 
151 or permission of instructor. 

280. Special Seminar. (4) (See previous description.) 

281. Honors Course. (4) (See previous description.) 

282. Individual Study. (4) (See previous description.) 

283. 284. Debate Practicum. (2, 2) (See previous description.) 

353. British Public Address. (4) A historical and critical survey of leading Britis 
speakers and their speeches from the sixteenth century to the present. 

354. American Public Address. (4) The history and criticism of American publ: 
address from colonial times to the present. 

S355. Directing the Forensic Program. (4) A pragmatic study of the methods a 
directing high school and college forensics with work in the High School Debat 
Workshop. Offered in the summer. 

356. The Rhetoric of Race Relations. (4) A study of race relations in America i 
reflected in the rhetoric of selected black and white speakers. Students apply th 
historical/critical method in exploring the effects of discourse on attempts at inte 
racial communication. 



357. The Rhetoric of the Women's Movement. (4) A study of selected wome 
activists and the impact of their speeches and arguments from the 1800s to th 
present. Emphasis on the "New Feminist Movement." Offered in January. 



I 147 

3 1. Research in Communication. (4) An introduction to design and statistical 
I >cedures for research in communication. 

3 !. A Survey of Organizational Communication. (4) An introduction to the role of 
c nmunication in organizations, with emphasis on field applications. 

3 1. Mass Communication Theory. (4) Theoretical approaches to the role of com- 
r nication in reaching mass audiences and its relationship to other levels of com- 
I nication. Offered in alternate years. 

3 ». Communication and Conflict. (4) A study of communication in conflict situa- 
t is on the interpersonal and societal levels. Offered in alternate years. P — Speech 
(nmunication 153 or permission of instructor. 
[j 

1 i. Small Group Communication Theory. (4) Advanced study of the principles of 
s ill group interaction and discussion leadership. P — Speech Communication 155 
c'permission of instructor. 

3 1. Semantics and Language Behavior. (4) A study of the syntactic and semantic 
ifects of communicative messages. 

Radio/Television/Film 

. Introduction to Broadcasting. (4) A study of the historical, legal, economic, and 
5' ial aspects of broadcasting. 

2 >. Introduction to Film. (4) Historical introduction to motion pictures through the 
s dy of various kinds of films and their relationship to society. 

2 I. Special Seminar. (4) (See previous description.) 

2 . Honors Course. (4) (See previous description.) 

2 . Individual Study. (4) (See previous description.) 

2 i, 284. Radio/Television/Film Practicum. (2, 2) (See previous description.) 

I . Radio/Television/Film Production. (2, 2, 2) Advanced radio/television/film 
p duction workshop. May be taken more than once for two credits each time, but for 
imore than a total of six credits. P— Speech Communication 283, 284. 

\ . Seminar in Radio/Television. (3 or 4) Extensive readings in and discussion of 
: ; damental theory and current issues in radio and television. Offered on an eleven- 
Vifteen-week basis. Offered in spring, 1982. P— Speech Communication 241. 

5 . Film Criticism. (3 or 4) A study of film aesthetics through an analysis of the work 
^elected film makers and film critics. Offered on an eleven- or fifteen-week basis. 
■\>red in Spring, 1981. P — Speech Communication 245. 

Theatre Arts 

I' . Introduction to the Theatre. (4) A survey of all areas of theatre art. Experience 
] aboratory and University Theatre productions. May be used to satisfy a require- 
j at in Division I. Lab — three hours. 



148 

223. Stagecraft. (4) A study of the basic elements of theatre technology. Practic; 
experience gained in laboratory and University Theatre productions. Open to fresl 
men and sophomores by permission of instructor. Lab — five hours. 

226. Theories of Acting. (4) A study of acting theories and fundamental actin 
techniques. Open to freshmen and sophomores by permission of instructor. Lai 
two hours. 

227. Theatre Speech. (4) An intensive course in the analysis and correlation of th 
physiological, physical, and interpretive aspects of voice and diction on the stage 

228. The Contemporary English Theatre. (4) An examination of the English theatre 
through reading, lectures, seminars, and attendance at numerous live theatre pel 
formances. The participants are expected to submit written reactions to the p|a| I 
which are seen. Ample time to allow visits to museums, libraries, and historic places 
Taught in London. Offered in January. P — Permission of instructor. 

280. Special Seminar. (4) (See previous description.) 

281. Honors Course. (4) (See previous description.) 

282. Individual Study. (4) (See previous description.) 

283. 284. Theatre Arts Practicum. (2, 2) (See previous description.) 

320. Theatrical Scene Design. (4) A study of the theories and styles of stage desigi 
and their application to the complete play. P — 1 heatre Arts 121 and 223 or permii I 
sion of instructor. 






321. Play Directing. (4) An introduction to the theory and practice of play directing 
A grade is not granted for this course until the student has completed Theatre Art 

322. Lab — two hours. P — Theatre Arts 121 and 226 or permission of instructor. 

322. Play Production Laboratory. (2) A laboratory in the organization, the tech 
niques, and the problems encountered in a dramatic production. The production of 
play for public performance required. P — Theatre Arts 321. 

3230. The English Theatre, 1660-1940. (4) A study of the major developments ii 
the English theatre from the Restoration to World War II, including the plavi 
playwrights, actors, audiences, theatre architecture, theatre management, costume; 
and sets. Field trips include visits to theatres, museums, and performances. Offered ivm 
London. 

S324. Directing the Drama Program. (4) A study of the function of drama in th 
educational curriculum, with emphasis on the secondary level. Laboratory work ii 
the High School Drama Workshop. Lab — six hours. Offered in the summer. 

325. Advanced Acting. (4) A concentrated study of the actor's art through theory arl 
practice. P — Theatre Arts 226 or permission of instructor. 

327. Theatre History I. (4) A survey of the development of the theatre from it 
origins to 1870; includes lectures, readings, and reports. 

328. Theatre History II. (4) A survey of the development of the modern theatre fro 
1870 to the present day; includes lectures, readings, and reports. 






149 



mh Advanced Theatre Speech. (4) Specific study in the theory and personal de- 
velopment of vocal melody, rhythm, color, and harmony according to the form, style, 
a I mood of a theatrical production. P — Theatre Arts 227 or permission of in- 
I actor. 




The Rare Book Room in Z. Smith Reynolds Library 



150 



Degrees Conferred 



July 29, 1978 

Bachelor of Arts 



Jess Dean Bailes 
James Clarke Bashelor 
Karen Suzanne Brande, 

with honors in history 
Richard Mauze Burr 
Virginia Carolyn Carroll 
Edward Joseph Cash 
Katherine Holmes Cochrane, 

cum laude 
Deborah Lynn Duckett 
John Krauss Hardage 
Michael Edward Jones 
Martha Elizabeth Kellar 
Brian Alan King 
Kennie Jean Liverman 



Barry Eugene Love 
James Frederick Mulling II 

laude, Kai David Nelson 

Ufo Ikechukwu Okeke 
George James Pahno 
Jeffrey Mitchill Pierce, cum laud 
John Carroll Pratt 
David William Regan 
Sherilyn Belinda Rogers 
Jeanne White Stovall, 

magna rum laude 
Reuben Anth ny Turner 
Edward Arnold Walker 
Patricia Gayle Watkins, rum lava 
John Lemuel Wooten Jr. 

Dawn Elizabeth Yandle 



Bachelor of Science 



Edward Bennett Anfindsen 
Napoleon Bonaparte Barefoot Jr 
Robert Joseph Bilbrough Jr. 
Jeffrev Gilbert Bullins 
Kenneth William Carter 
Donald Thomas Cervi 
Ann Baker Copeland 



Mark Adam Cregar 
Thomas Lawson Crouch 
James Carl Dumser 
Patricia Littleton Hall 
Ronald Lee McQueen 
Kenneth Trent Rvals, rum laude 
Robert Gregg Winchester 



February 13, 1979 

Bachelor of Arts 



Rodnev Morris Bennett 
Susan Annette Bishop, rum laude 
Robert David Boone 
Andrew Glenn Burgess 
James Philip Carroll, cum laude 
Mary Elizabeth Childress 
Edwin Clay Damewood 
David Huff Doulong 
Richard Alan Fox 



Jan Hazelrigg Gilliam 

Donald Lance Goodman 

Scott Mabon Hoch 

William Craig Hooper 

GraigJ. Hutchinson 

Kenneth Drake Kanoy 

Ann Williams Keiger, cum laudi 

John Francis Kronforst 

Laura Ellen Lyons, magna rum lay 



„ alter Brinkly Melvin 

;klyn Allison Mickle, cum laude 

ibert Lee Moore Jr. 

:bra Bodenheimer Mutton 
'. icia Joan Neary, magna cum laude 

hn Kent Pearson Jr., cum laude 
; mley Jerome Rolark 
. ine McMillan Ryals 
[ tuglas Donnelly Salyers, 

nagna cum laude 



151 

Margaret Emanuel Schmid, 

summa cum laude 
Preston Kahlil Smythe 
Lizabeth Ann Stickle 
Paul Robert Traywick 
Susanna Maria Von Canon, cum laude 
Sally Greene Watkins 
John Adair Watson 
John Louis Zeglinski 



Bachelor of Science 



'. vid Nielsen Bennett 
ctoria Lynn Calcagnini, cum laude 
: bert W. Chalanick 
'. rbara G. Grovert 
'. ul Millman Hesser IV 
Ltricia Linda Jolicoeur 
pralynn Ann Killian 
] bert Wayne Lawton 



Laurie Rae Ligon Long 
Thomas Edward McCarter 
John Edgar Pacer 
Betty Jane Reppert, cum laude 
Scott Kevin Shattuck 
Hiroshi Takahashi 
William Russell Transou 
Frank Judson Turner 



Julia Jia Jen Yu 
May 21, 1979 

Bachelor or Arts 



?len Sotira Sallie Adkins, 

um laude 
J Jin Bernard Albers, cum laude 

;eph Wilbur Allen Jr. 
t in Steven Alspaugh, cum laude 

sley Jean Anderson 
; chard Kelly Anderson 
i )ore Ugochukwu Asouzu 

rginia Grey Avent 
J irk Hauser Badgett, cum laude 

thleen Cynthia Bahry, cum laude 

lerie Ann Baker 
J ircia A. Banker 
• :ne Elizabeth Banks, cum laude, 
'< uith honors in Romance languages 

a Faye Barlow, cum laude 
1 ira Beth Barnes, cum laude 
, :hard Alan Baucom 
Bl'frey Mark Beal 



D. Scott Bedsole, cum laude 

Kenneth L. Bender 

Jack Hanson Berry 

Feodor Bijkersma 

William Edward Bivin 

Mary Anne Black 

William Meredith Bloss, cum laude, 

with honors in politics 
Laura Veach Boies 
Gary Franklin Bolick 
Catherine Elin Bolton, 

magna cum laude, 

with honors in anthropology 
Kyla Alexis Boone 
Frances Suzette Boukedes, cum laude 
John Corbet Bowers 
Sharon Denise Bowser, cum laude, 

with honors in psychology 
Gregory Coler Brann 



152 



Marietta Alberta Breidenthal, 

cum laude 
Steven Vincent Brewer 
Thomas Edmund Brewer Jr., 

magna cum laude, 

with honors in biology 
David Tyson Broome 
Philip Wilson Broome 
Judith Lvnn Brown 
Robert Hadley Brown, cum laude, 

with honors iti polities 
Steven Lee Brown 
Patricia Tracy Bumsted 
Debra Lou Burns, cum laude 
James Henry Burrus Jr. 
Elizabeth Ellen Burton 
Stephen H. Caldwell, 

magna cum laude 
Anne Sohngen Calkins, cum laude 
Walter Gardner Campbell, 

magna cum laude 
Brigitta Margareta Carlson, cum laude 
John Stephen Carlton, 

magna cum laude 
Myra Allene Can 
Mary Catherine Carter 
Thomas Wesley Chipman, cum laude 
Lee Ann Chrisman 
Martha Josephine Clinkscales 
Jeffrey Wayne Cobb 
Charles Kelley Corbridge 
Donna Elizabeth Corey 
James Love Corn well IV 
Nathan Ancle Couch 
Jay Jackson Coyle 
Barbara Ellen Craig 
Jennifer Holmes Crawley, cum laude 
Sidney Allen Crawley 
Linda Lou Crocker, magna cum laude 
Frances Clair Woodbury Crowe, 

cum laude 
James Nicholas Dadouris, cum laude 
John Marcus Dale 
Kenneth Herbert Daly 
Carla Lee Damron, cum laude 
Sharon Ann Darnell 



Richard William Davidson 
James Frederick Davis III 
Kenneth Erwin Davis 
Reid Sterling Davis 
Sheri Lane Davis 
Jane Beecher Dawkins, 

summa cum laude 
Karen Lynn Demarest 
Phyllis Huntley Dew 
Evan Hall Dillon, magna cum laude 
Donna Doulong 

Lauren Elizabeth Dovle, cum laude 
Cheryl Ann Duckworth, cum laude 
Nancy Elizabeth Dyson 
Sarah Kathryn Early, cum laude 
Christie Marie Efland 
Mark Douglas Eisler 
Laura Malone Elliott, cum laude 
Paul Charles Engstrom, cum laude 
Steven S. Erickson, cum laude 
Christopher Thomas Espenshade 
Judith Leigh Evans, cum laude, 

with honors in speech communication 

and theatre arts 
Mary Bridget Facchine, 

magna cum laude, 

with honors in psychology 
Dyer Jackson Farley III 
David Samuel Felman, 

magna cum laude, 

with honors in history and economics 
Elizabeth Martin Felts 
Amy Leigh Fickling, cum laude 
Dana Fishburne 

Anne Waring Foard, magna cum lave 
Michael Scott Forrest 
Suzanne Lynn Forry, 

magna cum laude, with honors in biolo{. 
Robert Ashley Forsyth 
William Edwin Foster Jr. 
David Lawrence Foulke 
Kathryn Lorraine Freeman, cum laud 

with honors in history 
Charles Edward Frye III 
Thomas Grady Fulghum, 

summa cum laude 



153 



ones Walker Fulton Jr. 
lizabeth Kaye Gable, 

magna cum laude 
?an Ellison Garvin 
met Lynn Gebbie, magna cum laude 
cott James Gerding, cum laude 
)hn Alexander Gildea, 

magna cum laude 

nne Shepherd Gilmore, cum laude 

ndrevv Richard Gluski, 

magna cum laude 

ina Selene Golding 

arol Ann Gough 

nna Ruth Grady, cum laude 

'avid Matheson Grant 

lamara Lynn Greb, cum laude, 

with honors in speech communication 

and theatre arts 
lichael Carroll Green 
, ndrew Steven Griffin, cum laude, 

with honors in biology 

'avid Lawrence Gunn 

( /endy Lee Haggerty, 

magna cum laude 
/ade Gorrell Hampton III 
teven Lynn Hamstead 
everly Elizabeth Harris 
athy Ann Harris 
amelajane Harris 
nn Hyman Harvey 
,avid Dewey Harwood, 

magna cum laude 
usan Banks Harwood, 
i magna cum laude, with honors in politics 
nomas Pace Hayes 
obert Nelson Headley Jr., cum laude 
atricia Ann Healy 
j obert Eugene Helv Jr. 
[yron Padgett Hendrix 
atherine Louise Henkens 
imothy Wright Herrick, 
L summa cum laude 
unes Pierce Hill Jr. 
/illiam David Hill II 



Nathaniel Morton Hilliard Jr., 

magna cum laude 

with honors in English 
Ann Chamberlain Hoffman 
Richard Clifton Hoffman 
Jeffery Paul Hogg, cum laude 
Timothy Stuart Hood, cum laude 
Carolyn Janelle Hooper, cum laude 
Elizabeth Anne Hooper 
Bruce Elliot Hopkins 
David William Hord 
Steve Horosko III 
Walter Linwood House 
Jo Ann Howell 
Robert Melton Howerton 
Jeffrey Charles Howland 
Stephanie Foster Hudson 
Joey Vernon Huff 
William Glenn Huggins Jr., cum laude 
Frank Alan Hull 
Jane Carolyn Hunley, cum laude 
Donald Bruce Hunsucker 
W. Thomas Huntsman, cum laude 
Christopher William Ingram 

cum laude 
Carolyn Louise Inman, cum laude 
Cynthia Louise Ives, cum laude 
Jean Kathryn Joel 
Hansford Frederic Johnson Jr., 

cum laude 
James Stanley Johnson 
Lucie Rebecca Johnson 
Pamela Kay Johnson, cum laude 
James Louis Joyce Jr. 
Andrew Houston Kahn, cum laude 
Gordon Charles Kammire, cum laude 
Graeme McGregor Keith Jr. 
Elizabeth Anne Kelton, cum laude 
Glenn Cameron Kent 
Susan Kelley Kersker 
Karen Ann Kindle 
Linda Mae Kitchings 
John Delmont Kling II 
Paul Chatterton Knepp 



154 

Pamela Jane Koch, summa cum laude 
Lynda Marie Kohnken 
Valerie Ann Kowalewski 
Robert Eugene Kragie Jr. 
John Frederick Krahnert Jr., 

cum laude 
Keith Andrew Kraner 
Mary Lucille Kuhn, magna cum laude 
Michael Randolph Langley 
Tina Christine Lawson 
Phillip Charles Leckrone, cum laude 
Rebecca Jane Lee, cum laude 
Roger Wayne Lee, cum laude 
Carolyn Beth Lehoczky, cum laude 
Richard Douglas Lemmerman Jr. 
Linda Susan Leonard, cum laude 
Michele E. Liles 
John Wesley Little III 
Douglas Shelton Long 
Stephen Melvin Lore, 

magna cum laude 
James Danny Love 
Linda Flores Love, cum laude 
Charles Timothy Lyda 
Allen Kevin Lydick 
Donald R. MacQueen 
Stephen Richard Madden Jr., 

cum laude 
Thomas Clyde Mann, cum laude 
Bryan Douglas Martin, cum laude, 

with honors in history 
Jeffrey Edwin Martin, cum laude 
Keith Monroe Martin, 

magna cum laude 
Mark Joseph Mattiko 
Glenn Elizabeth Maxwell, cum laude 
Nancy Wolfe McAdams, cum laude 
Kathleen Mary McClay 
Elizabeth A. McCluer 
Brian Keel McCulloch 
Mary Patricia McHugh 
Mary Elizabeth McLean, 

magna cum laude 
Myra Lynn Miller, cum laude 
Robert Arthur Miller 
William Lynn Miller Jr., cum laude 



Waverly Mills Jr. 

Mary Beth Minor 

Joseph Owens Mitchell 

William Douglas Mitchell 

Mark Patrick Moir 

Elizabeth Jane Montague, cum laud 

Marcia Lynne Moonev 

Ellen Lois Moor, magna cum laude 

Caroline Gardner Moore, cum laud* 

Robert Walsh Moore Jr. 

David Francis Moran 

Cindy Moreland, cum laude 

R. Tyler Morgan, cum laude 

Bonita Jane Moss, cum laude 

John Robert Murphy 

Paul Brian Murphy, cum laude 

Katherine Wood Murray, cum laude 

Christine Lee Mvatt 
Jack Nales II 
Mary Catherine Nance 
Nancy Theresa Natelli 

Kathleen Neal, magna cum laude 
Etienne Benedict Neubeiser 
Don A. Nicholson 
Eric Edmund Nickeson 
Rudy Langdon Ogburn 
Donna Lynn Orsuto, cum laude 
Charles David Osborne 
Cynthia Lynn Osborne, 

magna cum laude 
Nancy Elizabeth Osborne 

magna cum laude 
Susan Gail Oualline, magna cum laud 
Gerald Patrick Owens 
Don Anthony Paradiso 
Terry Bruce Pardue 
Elizabeth Allen Parish, 
summa aim laude, 
with honors in psychology 
Nancy Elizabeth Parker, 

magna cum laude 
Christopher Parks 
Jeffrey Roland Parno, 

magna cum laude, with honors in bid 
Linda Jean Patterson, cum laude 
Janet Frances Pauca, cum laude 






155 



ilith Anne Pazdan 

F n Leigh Peeler, cum laude 

I )rge Clifton Pennell 

F Dert Wayne Phelps 

Men Keith Phillips 

Ei Mobley Phillips 

V liam John Pike III. 

yiagna cum laude, until honors in speech 
Communication and theatre arts 

F hard Lee Pippin, cum laude 

X ndy Kathleen Plumer, 
nmma cum laude 

^ x Donald Poore Jr. 

S nuel Michael Post 

[ les Anthony Powell 

f na Laurie Powers, cum laude, 
'"ith honors in politics 

F som Cleveland Proctor 1 1 1 

F nert Hugh Pryor, cum laude 

\ omas John Purwinis 

I rk Braxton Queen 

?d Diab Rabie 

[ .id Charles Ray 

I -ree Jane Reaching 

E lita Lynne Reeder 

[ eph Reginald Reeves Jr. 

F lip Madison Regan 

^ rion V. Reyling 

H el Elizabeth Rhodes, 
mgna cum laude 

E :tt High Riggs, magna cum laude 

5 iwn Cerise Risdon 

f-ies Avery Roberts III, cum laude 

^ ry Anne Robertson 

C ford B. Robinson Jr. 

I kie Robinson 

I 3mas Goff Robinson 

I ne Holladay Rodman 

F jinald LeVaughn Rodman 

V th Phillip Rogers 

^ icy Elizabeth Roper 

E iena Fay Harman Rosebrock, 

urn laude 
i )ert Judson Rosser 
1 eodore Michael Roussis 



Judith Yvonne Rowland, 

magna cum laude 
Scott Anthony Roy 
Thomas Alan Rozanski, 

magna cum laude, with honors in biology 
Thomas Gerard Rubino 
Charles Thomas Rush Jr. 
Cynthia Eileen Rushing 
James Richard Saintsing, 

magna cum laude 
Martha Wallis Salt 
Caterina Sanchez 
Joseph Matthew Santi, 

summa cum laude, with honors in speech 

communication and theatre arts 
Robert Paul Schaudies, cum laude 
Mark Ronald Scheeler 
Karen Darlene Schenk, 

magna cum laude, 

unth honors in psychology 
Mark Evan Schurmeier 
Jeffrey Scott Schwall 
Eugene P. Scolamiero 
Susan Elizabeth Scripsema 
Leanne Carol Seaver, cum laude 
Mark Richard Seggel, cum laude 
Robert Edward Seymour III 
Jewett Moncure Sharpe, cum laude 
Peter Carl Shipman 
John Barry Sikes 
Betsv Kay Simmons, cum laude 
Debra Lee Smith 
Jerome William Smith, cum laude 
Sandra Leigh Smith, magna dim laude, 

with honors in anthropology 
Virginia Ellen Smith, cum laude 
Stephen Hughes Spragins 
Edward Holmes Stall Jr., cum laude 
Jimmy Alexander Steele 
Joseph John Michael Steffen Jr., 

cum laude 
Nadine Louise Stensland, 

magna cum laude 
Michael Joseph Stevenson 
Anda Lucille Strauss 



156 

Christopher de Beaulieu Sweet, 

cum laude 
Richard Jamille Tamer 
David Carlton Tassell, cum laude 
Cathy Marie Tatum 
Caron L. Tayloe 
Dennis Absher Taylor 
Valerie Jensen Taylor, 

magna cum laude 
Alexis Elizabeth Johnson Teague, 

cum laude 
Joel Thomas Teague 
Kenneth Alan Terzian 
James Edward Thomas Jr. 
John Michael Thomas, 

magna cum laude 
Kimberlv Thompson 
Constance Marie Thruston, 

cum laude 
Michael Bela Toth 
Morgan Ralph Towe 
Steven Henrv Trent 
Beth Anne Trousdale, cum laude 
Eleanor Wood Trowbridge, cum laude 
Theodore Neofytos Tsangaris 
Anna Maria Tsiantis 
Dana Gordon Tugman 
Michael Anthony Tyner, cum laude 
Scott Thomas Uffelman 
James Thomas Van Camp, cum laude 
Harold Wood Vann, cum laude 
Debbie Ellen Vest 
Abigail Archer Vinez, cum laude 
Debra Gail Vogler 
Carolyn Jean Vosburg, cum laude 
David Lvnn Wagoner, cum laude 
Vicki Lee Wagstaff, cum laude 
Richard Lee Walker 
Earl Franklin Wall, summa cum laude, 

with honors in politics 
Audrey Lee Wallace 
James William Scott Wallace, cum laude 
Allan Abba Waller 



Paul Andrew Walters III 

Donna Preston Ward 

Jan Lizabeth Ward, cum laude 

Anne Dudley Warner, cum laude 

Ruby Johnette Warren, cum laude 

Edwin McLee Watson 

Kathryn Ann Webb, magna cum lau, 

with honors in Latin 
Karl Thomas Weist, cum laude 
Glenn Leroy Werner, 

magna cum laude 
Ty Walter West 
Emmett Rovce White Jr. 
James Fisher White 
Ronda Snow White, cum laude 
Jacob Woodrow Whitener Jr. 
Jeanne Preston Whitman 
Wayne Edward Whitty, cum laude 
Lauren Reynolds Wilcher 
Carolyn Leone Williams 
Gregory Bruce Williams 
Martha Kimberlv Williams 
Susan Jane Williams, cum laude 
Ann Walker Williamson 
Gary Lee Willison 
Ann Lorentz Windon, 

magna cum laude 
Rodney Ray Windsor, cum laude 
Deborah Jane Winegard, 

magna cum laude 
Kenneth Hugh Winkler 
Brenda Sue Wofford, 

magna cum laude, 

with honors in psychology 
Alvce Morgan Woody 
Kathy Camille Worsham 
Elisabeth Anne Wyche 
Kenneth Howard Yearick 
Robin Leigh Young, cum laude 
Elizabeth Helen Yu, cum laude 
Betty Jo Zimmerman, cum laude 
Ruth Ann Zultner, cum laude 



Bachelor of Science 



.57 



ri Elizabeth Bailey 
son Kenneth Baker 
thryn Ann Baker, magna cum laude 
in Leland Barker 
uise Fisher Beaver 
egg Walter Beck 
ace William Beckert 
ri Ann Bellew 

ni Robin Blair, magna cum laude 
vid Gorrell Bodenheimer 
ry Marcia Bond 
tthew Howard Booher 
drew Bestes Bowden Jr. 
therine Lynn Boyce, cum laude 
bby Glenn Brewington 
nes David Bronk 
rlton Ray Brooks Jr. 
lathan Henry Burke 
ink Anthony Capriglione, cum laude 
incis Anthony Carchedi 
nes Kenneth Carse 
rbara Mary Cleary 
ty Ann Consolo, cum laude, 
oith honors in physical education 
niel Glen Gonstantine 
die Suzanne Cooper, cum laude 
;ston Emmett Corbett 
ne Courtland Cowart 
len Diane Cox 

uglas Holmes Culpon Jr., cum laude 
arlotte McNeill Darden 
nthia Anyon Darnell 
ia Ann Darracott, cum laude 
)tt Charles David, cum laude 
uardo Del Carmen Teets 
bert Winston Dozier Jr. 
orge Louis Droz II 
vid Allan Dunn 
vid Lynn Dunnagan 
ven Lowell Easter 
ryn Ann Esser 
Ann Fink, cum laude 
bert Todd Flowe 
ssell Edmond Ford 



Frank Lord Frailey Jr. 

John Martin Gallahan 

Michael Joseph Gaona 

Paul Dale Gardner Jr. 

Thomas P. Gibbons 

Susan Beckwith Giesler, cum laude 

Joel Royce Gillespie 

John Preston Glynn, Jr. 

Kimberly Elizabeth Godley, cum laude 

Susan Patrice Graham, cum laude 

Virginia Alice Greiss 

Timothy Jennings Gunn, 

magna cum laude 
Sharon Ann Harvey 
W. Cameron Haskett 
Richard T. Henderson 
John Anthony Higgie 
Janet Lee Hopper, cum laude 
John Arthur Howard 
John Christian Huffman, cum laude 
Michael Joseph Iacobucci 
Brian William Jackson 
Stephen Newell Jeske 
Raymond Benjamin Jones III 
Reynolds Scott Keith 
Earl Clifton Kelley Jr. 
Peter Joseph Kelly, cum laude 
Kyra Henderson Kenan 
David McCue Kersey, cum laude 
Jeffrey Frederick Kies 
Fred Scott Koppenheffer, cum laude 
Dale Joseph Kratz 
Karl Vernon Kropp 
Michael J. Lakusta 
William Michael Langford, cum laude 
Randall Byron Lauffer, 

magna cum laude 
Jane Watt Lawler 
Stephen Cashwell Laws 
Edward Banks Leonard, cum laude 
Valerie H. Lewis, cum laude 
Thomas Harry Littell 
Henry Heath Long 
Todd M. Lord 



158 

John Richard Lowden 
Janet Diane Lucas, cum laude 
Patricia Payne Lunka, cum laude 
Quang Huyen Luong, cum laude 
Michael George Macher, cum laude 
Martha Ramage Mahon, cum laude 
Barbara Ann Martin, cum laude 
Steven George Matsik, cum laude, 

until honors in physics 
Thomas Edward McGabe 
Richard Hardie McDonald, cum laude 
Sandra Lee McGill, cum laude 
Thomas Davis McGowen Jr. 
Benjamin Fred McKaig 
James Kenneth McQueen Jr. 
Douglas Edward Meyer, cum laude 
Lawrence Mitchell Miller 
Emilv Hallman Moak 
Stuart Douglas Wolfgang Moore 
William Finch Morgan 
Martha Bailey Morrison 
Karen Ann Muehlstein, cum laude 
Alan Entrekin Nations 
Charles Mitchell Neaves Jr. 
David Alan Norman, magna cum laude 
Douglas Evatt Norton, summa cum laude 
Glenn Edward Palmer 
Nicholas James Pantinakis 
Bruce Paul Paolini 
Frances Kathleen Payne 
Samuel Joseph Perry 
Bonnie Lynn Peterson, cum laude 
Richard Lee Potter 
Charles Allen Prall 
Joseph Thomas Price Jr. 
Jeannie Elizabeth Prim 
David Whitehurst Ragsdale 
Bruce Paul Randall 
Andree Maria Rankin 
Oscar David Redwine 
Douglas James Reynolds, cum laude 



III 

I 

■i 



David Mark Salvatore 

David Chester Sane, summa cum lau 

Jane Gay Satchell, magna cum laude 

Linda S. Sattler, magna cum laude 

Joseph Rutherford Schadt, cum lau! 

John P. Scratchard 

William David Shannon 

Elizabeth Lenice Shaw, cum laude 

Laura Jean Smith, magna cum laude 

Lisa Gaye Smith 

Sandra Carol Smith 

David Brent Spear 

David Clinton Spivey 

James Michael Spragins 

Stanford Ryan Spurlin 

Gary Michael Stroner 

Roy Ervin Strowd Jr. 

William P. Taylor III 

Perrv Rickman Tharrington III 

Gary L. Thompson, summa cum laud 

with honors in mathematics 
Timothy Alan Tibbetts, cum laude 
Elizabeth Tornow 
Mark Richard Trever 
Cheryl Lynne Turner 
Cathy Evelyn Tutan, cum laude 
Edwin Mark Uebele 
Virginia Kay vonLackum 
Robert Edward von Sprecken Jr. 
Judith Taylor von Thron 
Julian Lafayette Wade III 
Amy Anne Warstler, cum laude 
Judith Lee Watkins 
Jane Campbell Williams, cum laude 
Kyle E. Winchester, magna cum laude 
Andrew John Witherell 
Harold Frederick Wolf III 
Donna Jean Worman, magna cum lauo 
Nancy Weimer Young 
Sarah Margaret Young 






159 



>mas William Andrew 
her Carl Beckerdite III, 
agna cum laude 
hael Jay Bybee 
k nn Elizabeth Clapp 
n Robert Connor 
>mas Malcolm Cooke 
ert Glenn Dennis Jr. 
ineth Robert Dyer 
es Burr Fairchild 
>mas Paul Graham 
ar Arnett Harris 
old Francis Harsh 
id Lewis Houston 
icy Parker Hutcheson 
id Terry Lawrence 



August 4, 1979 

Bachelor of Arts 

Marcus Bruce Liles 
Cheryl Ann O'Neal 
Paul Joseph Pascarelli 
Caryl Jones Rentz, cum laude 
Steven Adam Sanders, cum laude 
S. Jennifer Sault, magna cum laude, 

with honors in histoiy 
Gordon Franklin Skeeters 
James Bernard Slate Jr. 
Jo Cox Snodderly, cum laude 
John Belk Stamps 
Shari Lynn Tanke, cum laude 
Joseph Gray Taylor 
Cynthia Ardis Walker 
James Cannon White 
Cheryl Lynn Willoughby 
Abner Glenn Wright III 



Bachelor of Science 



\ hony Dane Bates 

I rey David Brooks, magna cum laude 

ith honors in psychology 
I Dert Maxton Craig III 
j *rge Beauchamp Hancock 
[t rey Robert Herman 
> ron Ann Jeffries 



William Frederick Laporte III 
Rosemary Jean Lunsford 
David Payne Nolan 
Richard Bernard Paschal 
Carl U. Patterson Jr. 
James Thomas Royster 
Debra Jane Spainhour 



February 12, 1980 

Bachelor of Arts 



tt Thomas Austin 

d Lynn Breedlove 

derick Wylie Brown 

n Stanley Clarkson 

lard Bryan Earls 

>mas Harrison Fetzer Jr. 

tha Kathren Galliher 

laid Graham 

)hen John Gurganus 

t Allyn Hunter 



Vinita Marie Hunter, cum laude 
Sidney Charles Jackson 
Charity Ann Johnson, cum laude 
Donald Livingston Johnson 
Kathy Sue Killian 
William Bernard Leisy 
Cynthia Helen Massey 
Weldon Cooper Matthews III 
Glen F. Mickey 
Michael R. Nicolais 



160 

William Edwin Stoltz 
Michael William Stubeck 
Nancy Lvnn Team 



Thomas Eli Turlington Jr 
William Chase White Jr. 
Frances Crews Wilmarth 
Sallie Hart Yaskin, cum laude 

Bachelor of Science 



Kevin Mark Amigh 

Teresa Mae Arnold 

Neal Brown III 

Laura Leigh Elliott, cum laude 

Mary Llewellvn Faircloth, cum laude 

Sandra Lynn Goodwin, 

magna cum laude 
Victor Fisher Harllee Jr. 
Kenneth Perry Hawkins 



Marcus Austin Kester, cum lam 
Mary Ellen Koehne, cum laude 
Joseph William Leighton 
Louis Ray McCallister Jr. 
Roy Eugene Passage 
Ryland Restee Roane Jr. 
Gerald Matthew Small Jr. 
Kelle Annette Smith, cum laude 
John Kelly Thompson 
Philip Anthony Wall 



' 




1979 Commencemeyit speaker, Margaret Callaghanjay 



Honor Societies 



Omicron Delta Kappa 



Members of 

am Meredith Bloss 
Je Sohngen Calkins 
J;er Gardner Campbell 
, Ann Darracott 

i Marcus Dale 
Beecher Dawkins 

a Malone Elliott 

d Samuel Felman 
,mas Grady Fulghum 

othy Wright Herrick 

am Thomas Huntsman 

hia Louise Ives 



the Class of 1979 

Michael John Lakusta 
Cindy Moreland 
Christine Lee Myatt 
Douglas Evatt Norton 
Nancy Elizabeth Osborne 
William John Pike III 
James Richard Saintsing 
Joseph Matthew Santi 
Jane Gay Satchell 
Edward Holmes Stall 
Jan Lizabeth Ward 
Betty Jo Zimmerman 



V am Meredith Bloss 
■ e Sohngen Calkins 
Vper Gardner Campbell 
u| Ann Darracott 
o|i Marcus Dale 
B Beecher Dawkins 
Era Malone Elliott 



d Samuel Felman 
mas Grady Fulghum 
am Thomas Huntsman 
hia Louise Ives 



Mortar Board 

Members of the Class of 1979 

Michael John Lakusta 
Cindy Moreland 
Douglas Evatt Norton 
Nancy Elizabeth Osborne 
William John Pike III 
James Richard Saintsing 
Joseph Matthew Santi 
Jane Gay Satchell 
Edward Holmes Stall 
Jan Lizabeth Ward 
Betty Jo Zimmerman 

Phi Beta Kappa 



tryn Ann Baker 
hen Hugh Caldwell 
er Gardner Campbell 
i Stephen Carlton 
a Lou Crocker 
i Hall Dillon 
Beecher Dawkins 
/ Bridget Facchine 
d Samuel Felman 
nne Lynn Forry 



Members of the Class of 1979 

Thomas Grady Fulghum 
Elizabeth Kaye Gable 
Janet Lynn Gebbie 
John Alexander Gildea 
Andres Ricardo Gluski 
John Marcus Gulley 
Timothy Jennings Gunn 
Wendy Lee Haggerty 
David Dewey Harwood 
Susan Banks Harwood 



162 

Timothy Wright Herrick 
Cynthia Diane Knight 
Pamela Jane Koch 
Randall Byron Lauffer 
Stephen Melvin Lore 
Patricia Payne Lunka 
Keith Monroe Martin 
Kathleen Neal 
Tricia Joan Neary 
David Alan Norman 
Douglas Evatt Norton 
Cynthia Lynn Osborne 
Nancy Elizabeth Osborne 
Susan Gail Oualline 
Elizabeth Allen Parish 
Nancy Elizabeth Parker 
Jeffrey Roland Parno 
William John Pike III 
Wendy Kathleen Plumer 
Brett High Riggs 
Judith Yvonne Rowland 
Thomas Alan Rozanski 
James Richard Saintsing 



- 



Douglas Donnelly Salyers 
David Chester Sane 
Joseph Matthew Santi 
Jane Gay Satchell 
Linda Sue Sattler 
S. Jennifer Sault 
Margaret Emanuel Schmid 
Jewett Moncure Sharpe 
Laura Jean Smith 
Sandra Leigh Smith 
Nadine Louise Stensland 
Valerie Jensen Taylor 
Gary Lynn Thompson 
Constance Marie Thruston 
Earl Franklin Wall 
Kathryn Ann Webb 
Glenn Leroy Werner 
Jeanne Preston Whitman 
Kyle Edward Winchester 
Deborah Jane Winegard 
Brenda Sue Wo f ford 
Donna Jean Worman 



if 




Enrollment 



163 



Fall 1979 



h College 

I )rs 
u: >rs 

o omores 
r< lmen 
Jr assified 



Men 



1,950 



Women 



1,209 



Total 



483 


277 


760 


442 


283 


725 


481 


289 


770 


526 


332 


858 


18 


28 


46 



3,159 



'h Graduate School 

( jnolda Campus) 
It er's Program 
lc oral Program 
h assified 

cl 



85 


113 


198 


8 


2 


10 


4 


14 


18 



97 



129 



226 



1 Graduate School 

I awthorne Campus) 
tier's Program 
oral Program 
HUassified 



9 


5 


14 


47 


21 


68 


3 


1 


4 



59 



86 



If School of Law 



379 



128 



507 



1 Babcock Graduate 
1 hool of Management 

Her's Program 
Hutive Program 

VI 



'1 Bowman Gray 
hool of Medicine 

d Health Programs 



118 


29 


147 


44 


11 


55 


162 


40 


202 


351 


77 


428 


44 


82 


126 



3,042 



1,692 



4,734 



164 

States 



Alabama 

Alaska 

Arizona 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

Delaware 

District of Columbia 

Florida 

Georgia 

Hawaii 

Idaho 

Illinois 

Indiana 

Iowa 

Kansas 

Kentucky 

Louisiana 

Maine 

Maryland 

Massachusetts 

Michigan 

Minnesota 

Mississippi 

Missouri 

Montana 

Nebraska 

Nevada 

New Hampshire 

New Jersey 

New Mexico 

New York 

North Carolina 

North Dakota 

Ohio 

Oklahoma 

Oregon 

Pennsylvania 

Rhode Island 

South Carolina 

South Dakota 

Tennessee 



Men 


Women 


Total 


2 


3 


5 




1 


1 




1 


1 


1 




I 


4 


4 


8 


2 


1 


3 


43 


7 


50 


23 


17 


40 


8 


3 


11 


111 


51 


162 


47 

1 


34 
1 


81 
1 
1 


33 


9 


42 


5 


1 


6 


1 


1 


2 


2 


1 


3 


24 


11 


35 


9 


2 


4 


1 


2 


3 


110 


61 


171 


16 


4 


20 


13 


2 


15 


3 


1 


4 


2 


3 


5 


2 


1 


3 



2 




2 


122 


51 

1 


173 
1 


91 


29 


120 


828 


665 


1493 


44 


26 


70 


2 


1 


3 


111 


19 


130 


3 




3 


48 


22 


70 


2 


1 


3 


30 


22 


52 



165 



f as 



I led States Territories 

J ted States Citizens Abroad 

S'h 

/ mont 

/ nnia 

A hington 

A t Virginia 

A :onsin 

A >ming 



2 
150 

26 
3 

1 



114 

1 

21 

3 



Other Countries 



10 
3 



2 
264 
1 
47 
6 
1 




An art exhibit in the lobby of the Scales Fine Arts Center 



166 

The Board of Trustees 



Terms Expiring December 31, 1980 

A. Douglas Aldrich, Gastonia Weston P. Hatfield, Winston-Salem 

M. Alexander Biggs, Rocky Mount fames R. Helvey 111. Lexington 

Howard Bullard, Fayetteville Sara Page Lewis, Charlotte 

Jean Hopson Gaskin |. Robert Philpott, Lexington 

I). L. Ward Jr., Lumberton 



Terms Expiring December 31, 1981 

E. Lee Gain, High Point G. Hunter Moricle St., Reidsville 

Gloria F. Graham, Wilson W. Linville Roach, Greensboro 

Rav K. Hodge, Kinston Colin Stokes, Winston-Salem 

James L. Johnson, Rowland Charles L. Tanner, Garner 

Richard A. Williams, Maiden 



Terms Expiring December 31, 1982 

Joseph Branch, Raleigh Robert A. Culler, High Point 

Dewey H. Bridget Jr., Bladenboro Manuel E. Cannup, Greensboro 

James T. Broyhill, Lenoir Charles Cedric Davis, Farmville 

C. Frank Colvardjr., West Jefferson J oil n I). Larkins, Trenton 
William W. Leathers III, Rockingham 



Terms Expiring December 31, 1983 

Charles W. Cheek, Greensboro Pete Lovette, Wilkesboro 

Thomas H. Davis, Winston-Salem Claude A. McNeill Jr., Elkin 

C. C. Hope Jr., Charlotte Mary Lide Morris, Burlington 

John M. Lewis, Raleigh Dale Simmons. Mt. Airy 

Lonnie Williams, Wilmington 



Officers 

(For one-year terms beginning January 1, 1980) 

Colin Stokes, Winston-Salem. Chairman 

J. Robert Philpott. Lexington, Vice-Chairman 

Elizabeth S. Drake, Winston-Salem, Secretary 

John C. Williard, Winston-Salem, Treasurer and Assistant Secretary 

Womble Garble Sandridge & Riee, Winston-Salem. General Counsel 

Leon H. Corbett Jr., Winston-Salem, Associate General Counsel 



167 

The Board of Visitors 



Arnold Palmer, Latrobe, Pennsylvania 

Chairman, University Boards of Visitors 

I 

Terms Expiring December 31, 1980 

I- rbert Brenner, Winston-Salem Albert S. Lineberry Sr., Greensboro 

E )ert P. Caldwell, Gastonia J°hn G. Medlin Jr., Winston-Salem 

V ton Dillon, Washington, 1). C. Katharine Babcock Mountcastle, 
F nk Forsyth, Winston-Salem New Canaan, Connecticut 

I ne Reynolds Forsyth, Winston-Salem James R. Peterson, Winston-Salem 
\ Burnett Harvey, Chairman, Frank Thompson, Washington, D. C. 

loston, Massachusetts George Williamson Jr., 

L lwood Lennon, Orlando Florida Poughkeepsie, New York 

Meade H. Willis Jr.. Winston-Salem 

Terms Expiring December 31, 1981 

V Ham N. Austin, Jo DeYoung Thomas, Miami, Florida 
x>s Angeles, California Patrick L. M. Williams, 

J n Fairchild, New York, New York Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

\ Ham F. Laporte, New York, N. Y. J. Tvlee Wilson, Winston-Salem 

Terms Expiring December 31, 1982 

S nuel H. Adler, Rochester, New York Harold T. P. Hayes, New York, New York 

I j;ya Angelou, Pacific Albert R. Hunt Jr., Washington, D. C. 

Palisades, California Graham A. Martin, Winston-Salem 

\ Ham L. Bondurant, Winston-Salem Martin Mayer, New York, New York 

V llace Carroll, Winston-Salem Jasper D. Memory, Raleigh 

F ph Ellison, New York, New York Bill Movers, New York, New York 

Eugene Owens, Charlotte 

Terms Expiring December 31, 1983 

( orge Anderson, Jacksonville, Florida Constance Gray, Winston-Salem 

/ R. Amnions, Ithaca, New York Charles U. Harris, Delaplane, Virginia 

| rt Bennett, Winston-Salem Hubert Humphrev, Greensboro 

J in Chandler, Williamstown, James Alfred Martin Jr. 
; Massachusetts New York, New York 

I rrimon Cuninggim, Winston-Salem Earl Slick, Winston-Salem 

1J nald Deal, Hickory Zacharv I . Smith, Winston-Salem 

I :hur E. Earley, Cleveland, Ohio Feme Sticht, Winston-Salem 

Honorary Members 

Walter E. Greer Jr., Greensboro 
Gerald Johnson, Baltimore, Maryland 

Ex-Officio Member 

Kvle Young, Greensboro (President, Wake Forest Alumni Association) 




President James R. Scales 



-I 



169 

The Administration 



Date following name indicates year of appointment. 
University 

les R. Scales (1967) President 

B. A., Oklahoma Baptist; M.A., Ph.D., Oklahoma; Litt.D., 

Northern Michigan; LL.D., Alderson-Broaddus; LL.D., Duke 

E|»vin Graves Wilson (1946, 1951) Provost 

B.A., Wake Forest; A.M., Ph.D., Harvard 

h nson Meads (1947, 1963) Vice President for Health Affairs and 

B.A., California; M.D., Sc.D., Temple Director of the Medical Center 

pin G. Williard (1958) Vice President and Treasurer 

B.S., North Carolina (Chapel Hill); C.P.A., North Carolina 

( William Joyner Jr. (1969) Vice President for Development 

B.A., Wake Forest 

I 

I ssell H. Brantley Jr. (1953) Assistant to the President and 

B.A., Wake Forest Director oj Communications 

I'yressa H. Schoonmaker (1975) Assistant to the President for Legal Affairs 

:' B.A., J. D., Wake Forest 

I :>n Gorbett (1968) Associate General Counsel 

B.A., J.D., Wake Forest 

1 nry B. Stokes (1977) Director of Denominational Relations 

B.A., Wake Forest; Th.B., Southern Baptist Seminary 

1 ss A. Griffith (1966) Director of Equal Opportunity 

B.S., Wake Forest; M.Ed., North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

1 rry L. Palmer (1978) Director of Minority Affairs 

B.A., Emory; M.Ed., Texas Southern; Ed.D., Indiana 

I Rick Heatley (1970) Associate in Academic Administration 

B.A., Baylor; M.A., Ph.D., Texas and Associate Director 

of Educational Planning and Placement 

College 

' omas E. Mullen (1957) Dean of the College 

B.A., Rollins; M.A., Ph.D., Emory 

l;bert Allen Dyer (1956) Associate Dean 

B.A., Louisiana State; Th.M., Ph.D., Southern Baptist Seminary 

'by A. Hale (1970) Assistant Dean and Director of Educational 

B.A., Wake Forest; M.Div., Duke; Ed.D., Indiana Planning and Placement 

'tricia Adams Johnson (1969) Academic Counselor 

B.A., Winston-Salem State; M.A., Wake Forest 



170 



Graduate School 



Henry Smith Stroupe (1937) 

B.S., M.A., Wake Forest; Ph.d., Duke 

Harold O. Goodman (1958) 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Minnesota 



Dean of the Graduate Schc 

Associate Dean for Biomedk 
Graduate Studi 



School of Law 



John D. Scarlett (1955, 1979) 

B.A., Catawba; J. D., Harvard 

Leon H. Corbett Jr. (1968) 
B.A.. J.D., Wake Forest 

Elva L. Jess (1978) 

B.A., Methodist; J. D.. Wake Forest 

Laura L. Myers (1959) 

Jeanne T. Wilson (1974) 
B.A., Oklahoma State 



Dean of the School of La 

Associate Dca 

Assistant Dm 

Registrar and Director of Placemei 
Director of Admission 



Babcock Graduate School of Management 



Edward L. Felton Jr. 

B.A., Richmond; B.D., Southeastern Seminary; 
M.B.A, D.B.A., Harvard 

Bernard L. Beatty (1974, 1976) 

B.S., Ohio State; M.B.A., Ph.D., Harvard 



Dean of the Babcock Gradual 

School of Management am 

Professor of Managemen 

Associate Dem 



Jean B. Hopson (1970) Assistant Dear 

B.S. in Fd., Murray State; M.S. in F.S., George Peabody; M.B.A., Wake Forest 

William D. Shea (1978) Director of Placement and Admission 

B.A., Hunter; M.A., North Carolina (Chapel Hill); M.B.A., Harvard 



Richard Janeway (1966) 

B.A., Colgate; M.D., Pennsylvania 



Nat E. Smith (1976) 

B.A., Erskine; M.D., Georgia 

C. Nash Herndon (1942, 1966) 
B.A., Duke; M.D.. Jefferson 

J. Kiffin Penry (1979) 

B.S., M.D., Wake Forest 

Clyde T. Hardy Jr. (1941) 
B.A., Richmond 

Warren H. Kennedy (1971) 
B.B.A., Houston 

John D. Tolmie (1970) 

B.A., Hobart; M.D., McGill 



Bowman Gray School of Medicine 

Dean of the Bowman Gra\ 
School of Medici nt 

Associate Dean I 



Senior Associate Dean for Research Developmenl 

Associate Dean for Research Development 
(Neurosaences) 

Associate Dean for Patient Services 
Associate Dean for Administration 
Associate Dean for Student Affairs 



171 

E ery C. Miller, Jr. (1955) Associate Dean for Continuing Education 

I B.A., North Carolina (Chapel Hill); M.D., Johns Hopkins 

J. n H. Felts (1978) Associate Dean for Admissions 

i B.S., Wofford; M.D., South Carolina 

J ies C. Leist (1974) Assistant Dean for Continuing Education 

B.S., Southeastern Missouri State; M.S., Ed.D., Indiana 

J tennis Hoban (1978) Director of the Office of 

B.A., Villanova; M.S., Ed.D., Indiana Educational Research and Services 

Summer Session 

P rival Perry (1939, 1947) Dean of the Summer Session 

B.A., Wake Forest; M.A., Rutgers; Ph.D., Duke 

Student Services 

I /id Allen Hills (1960) Coordinator of Student Sendees 

B.A., Kansas; M.A., Ph.D., Iowa 

b rk H. Reece (1956) Dean of Men 

B.S., Wake Forest 

! 

La M. Leake (1964) Dean of Women 

B.A., Louisiana State; M.R.E., Southern Baptist Seminary 

I ward R. Cunnings (1974) Director of Housing and 

B.S.M., M.Ed., St. Lawrence Assistant to the Dean of Men 

", nothy L. Reese (1978) Director of the College Union 

B.A., Lebanon Valley; M.Ed., Pennsylvania State 

Pan M. Austin (1975) Director of the Center for 

B.A., Monmouth; M.S.Ed., Ph.D., Southern Illinois Psychological Seivices 

f rianne Schubert (1977) Assistant Director of the Center for 

B.A., Dayton; M.A., Ph.D., Southern Illinois Psychological Services 

Rry Ann H. Taylor (1961, 1978) Director of the Health Service 

B.S., M.D., Wake Forest 

Campus Ministry 

I* gar D. Christman ( 1 956, 1 96 1 ) Chaplain 

B.A., J.D., Wake Forest; B.D., Southeastern Baptist Seminary; S.T.M., Union Seminary 

B ristal M. Williams (1980) Assistant Chaplain and 

B.A., California Baptist Baptist Campus Minister 



Records and Institutional Research 

n M. Seelbinder (1959) Director of Records and Institutional Research 

B.A., Mississippi Delta State; M.A., Ph.D., North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

irgaret R. Perry (1947) Registrar 

B.S., South Carolina 



172 



Personnel 



James L. Ferrell (1975) Director of Person 

B.A., North Carolina (Chapel Hill); M.S., Virginia Commonwealth 

Admissions and Financial Aid 

William G. Starling (1958) Director of Admissions and Financial A 

B.B.A., Wake Forest 









Shirley P. Hamrick (1957) Associate Director of Admissio 

B.A.. North Carolina (Chapel Hill); MA. in Ed., Wake Forest 

Charles M. Carter (1972) Assistant Director of Admissio 

B.S., Winston-Salem State; M.S., Indiana and Financial A 

W. Douglas Bland (1975) Assistant Director of Admissio 

B.A., MA. in Ed., Wake Forest 

Lyne S. Gamble (1978) Assistant Director of Admissio 

B.A., Millsaps 

Ellen C. Lipscomb (197(3) Admissions and Financi 

B.A., Wake Forest Aid Counseli 

Communications and Publications 

Russell H. Brantley Jr. (1953) Assistant to the President an 

B.A., Wake Forest Director of Communication 

Martha W. Lentz (1973) University Publications Edito 

B.A., North Carolina (Chapel Hill); M.B.A., Wake Forest 

William E. Ray (1975) Associate in Communication 

B.A., Wake Forest; M.A., Ph.D., North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

Development and Alumni Activities 

G. William Joyner Jr. ( 1 969) Vice President for Developmen 

B.A., Wake Forest 

Julius H. Corpening (1969) Director of Developmen 

B.A., Wake Forest; B.D., Southern Baptist Seminary 

Robert D. Mills ( 1 972) Director of Alumni Activity 

B.A., Wake Forest 

Robert T. Baker (1978) University Development Offici 

B.A., M.S., Ceorge Peabody 

Minta Aycock McNally ( 1 978) Director of the College Fund 

B.A., Wake Forest 

W. Craig Jackson (1978) Assistant Director of Alumni Activities 

B.A., Wake Forest 

James Reid Morgan (1980) Foundations Office) 

B.A., J. D. Wake Forest 

Financial Affairs 

John G. Williard (1958) Vice President and Treasurer 

B.S., North Carolina (Chapel Hill); C.P.A., North Carolina 



173 



C los O. Holder (1969) Controller and Assistant Treasurer 

B.B.A., Wake Forest 

Derald Hagen (1978) Assistant Controller 

B.S., Virginia Polytechnic 



lv 



Libraries 



M rill G. Berthrong (1964) Director of Libraries 
B.A., Tufts; M.A., Fletcher; Ph.D., Pennsylvania 

tard J. Murdoch (1966) Assistant to the Director and 

B.A., Pennsylvania Military; M.S. in L.S. ? Villanova Curator of Rare Books 



J< 



meth A. Zick II (1975) Director of Law Library Services 

B.A., Albion; J. D., Wayne State; M.L.S., Michigan 

an L. Wilson (1960) Librarian of the School of Law 

B.A., Coker; B.S. in L.S., George Peabody 

h B. Hopson (1970) Librarian of the Babcock Graduate 

B.S. in Ed., Murray State; M.S. in L.S., School of Management 

George Peabody; M.B.A., Wake Forest 

fy hael D. Sprinkle (1972) Librarian of the Bowman Gray 

B.A., M.S. in L.S., North Carolina (Chapel Hill) School of Medicine 

* Athletics 

G-iugene Hooks (1956) Director of Athletics 

B.S., Wake Forest; M.Ed., North Carolina (Chapel Hill); Ed.D., George Peabody 

E^othy Casey (1949) Director of Women s Athletics 

B.S., North Carolina (Greensboro); M.A., North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

Other Administrative Offices 

I holas B. Bragg (1970) Executive Director of Reynolda House 

B.A., Wake Forest 
S 1 , 
F Davidson Burgess Jr. (1974) Director oj Bands 

B.S., Concord; M.A., Marshall 

In 

J an C. Burroughs Jr. (1958) Director of Radio 

B.A., Wake Forest; M.A., Ph.D., Michigan 

E hard T. Clay (1956) Director of University Stores 

B.B.A., Wake Forest 

1 3mas M. Elmore (1962) Director of Counselor Education 

B.A., Wake Forest; M.A., George Peabody; Ph.D., Ohio State 

j 

\ tor Faccinto (1978) Director of the Art Gallery 

B.A., M.A., California 

F il M. Gross Jr. (1959) Coordinator of the Hoyiors Program 

B.S., Duke; Ph.D., Brown 

I /id W. Hadley (1966) Coordinator of London Programs 

B.A., Wake Forest; A.M., Ph.D., Harvard 



174 



John H. Litcher (1973) 

B.S., Winona State; M.A., Ph.D., Minnesota 

John V. Mochnick (1976) 

B.M., Heidelberg; M.M., Indiana; D.M.A., Cincinnati 

Harold S. Moore (1953) 
B.M.E., Virginia 

Herman }. Preseren (1953) Director of the Educational Media Cci 

B.S., California State (Pennsylvania); M.A., Columbia; 
Ph.D., North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

William E. Ray (1975) Director of Concerts and Carillonm 

B.A., Wake Forest; M.A., Ph.D., North Carolina (Chapel Hi 



Director of Teacher EducaA 

Director of Ch 

Director of the Physical Pt 



Harold C. Tedford (1965) 

B.A., Ouachita; M.A., Arkansas; Ph.D., Louisiana State 

Donald H. Wolfe (1968) 

B.S., M.S., Southern Illinois; Ph.D., Cornell 



Director of Thea 

I 

Associate Director of Thea 



& 




Provost and Professor of English Edwin G. Wilson talks with students 



175 



The College Faculty 



Date following name indicates year of appointment. 



rles M. Allen (1941) 
B.S., M.S., Wake Forest; Ph.D., Duke 

R,)h D. Amen (1962) 



Professor of Biology 

Associate Professor of Biology 
B.A., M.A., Northern Colorado; M.B.S., Ph.D., Colorado 

jc i L. Andronica (1969) Associate Professor of Classical Languages 

B.A., Holy Cross; M.A., Boston College; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins 

Jc 1 1 William Angell (1955) Professor of Religion 

B.A., Wake Forest; S.T.M., Andover Newton; Th.M., Ph.D., Southern Baptist Seminary 



Bjica Artom (1975) 

BfinM. Austin (1975) 

B.A., Monmouth; Ph.D., Southern Illinois 

H Wallace Baird (1963) 

B.A., Berea; Ph.D., Wisconsin 

E 'endleton Banks (1954) 

B.A., Furman; A.M., Ph.D., Harvard 

JilesP. Barefield (1963) 

B.A., M.A., Rice; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins 

RJiardC. Barnett (1961) 

B.A., Wake Forest; M.Ed., Ph.D., North Carolina (Chapel Hi 

«JJjn V. Baxley (1968) 

B.S., M.S., Georgia Tech; Ph.D., Wisconsin 

RkrtC. Beck (1959) 
B.A., Ph.D., Illinois 

Diald B. Bergey (1978) 
% B.S., M.A., Wake Forest 

V&TillG. Berthrong(1964) 

B.A., Tufts; M.A., Fletcher; Ph.D., Pennsylvania 

Dwrah L. Best (1972, 1978) 
& B.A., M.A., Wake Forest 

Riunas Bigelis (1979) 

B.S., Illinois (Chicago); Ph.D., Purdue 

E /id Bindman (1977) 

B.A., M.A., Oxford; Ph.D., Courtauld 



Lecturer in Romance Languages 
Lecturer in Psychology 

Professor of Chemistry 

P rofesso r of A nth ropology 

Associate Professor of History 

Professor of History 

Professor of Mathematics 

Professor of Psychology 

Instructor in Physical Education 

Associate Professor of History 

Instructor in Psychology 

Assistant Professor of Biology 

Lecturer in Art History 
(London) 



H leave, spring 1 980 
If t-time 



176 

*Carol Lynn Blount (1979) Instructor in Physical Educan ! 

B.S., M.A., Wake Forest 

W. Thomas Boone (1973) Assistant Professor of Physical Educat 

B.S., M.Ed., Northwestern State; Ph.D., Florida State 

David G. Brailow (1979) Visiting Assistant Professor of Eim 

B.A., Amherst; M.A., Ph.D., Oregon 

Germaine Bree (1973) Kenan Professor of Humanii 

Licence, E.E.S., Agregation, Paris; Litt.D., Smith, Mount Holyoke, Alleghai 

Duke, Oberlin, Dickinson, Rutgers, Wake Forest, Brown, Wisconsin, New Yo 

Massachusetts, Kalamazoo; L.H.D., Wilson, Colby, Michigan, Davis and Elldl 

LL.D., Middlebury 

Robert W. Brehme (1959) Professor of Phys 

B.S., Roanoke; M.S., Ph.D., North Carolina 

David B. Broyles (1966) Associate Professor of Polit 

B.A., Chicago; B.A., Florida; M.A., Ph.D., California (Los Angeles) 

Hetty Jo Brumbach (1979) Visiting Assistant Professor of Anthropvlo 

B.A., Hunter (C.U.N. Y.); M.A., Ph.D., S.U.N. Y. (Albany) 

George McLeod Bryan (1956) Professor of Relun, 

B.A., M.A., Wake Forest; B.D., Ph.D., Yale 

Shasta M. Bryant (1966) Professor of Romance Languat 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

Julian Bueno ( 1 978) Visiting Assistant Profess?; 

B.A., Pan-American; M.A.. Ph.D., Texas Tech of Romance Languag 

Julian C. Burroughs Jr. (1958) Professor of Speech Communicatk 

B.A., Wake Forest; M.A., Ph.D., Michigan 

Richard D. Carmichael (1971) Associate Professor of Mathematu 

B.S., Wake Forest; M.A., Ph.D., Duke 

** Wallace Carroll (1974) Sam J. Ervinjr. University Lectin* 

B. Litt., Marquette; LL.D., Duke; Litt.D., Wake Forest, Marquette 

John A. Carter Jr. ( 1 96 1 ) Professor of Englis 

B.A., Virginia; M.A., Ph.D., Princeton 

Dorothy Casey ( 1 949) Assistant Professor of Physical Educatw, 

B.S., North Carolina (Greensboro); M.A., North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

David W. Catron (1963) Associate Professor of Psycholog 

B.A., Furman; Ph.D., George Peabody 

; *Gale M. Chamblee (1978) Instructor in Physical Educatim] 

B.A., East Carolina; M.A.T., North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

Glenn L. Clark Jr. (1976) Lecturer in BusinM 

B.S., Ohio State; M.B.A., Kentucky 



*P 'art-time, fall 1979 
**Part-time 



177 

ft.rvin S. Coats (1976) Lecturer in Art 

B.S.A., East Texas State; M.F.A., Oklahoma 

Ji<n E. Collins (1970) Associate Professor of Religion 

B.S., M.S,. Tennessee; B.D., Southeastern Baptist Seminary; Ph.D., Princeton 

P'rick W. Conover (1979) Visiting Assistant Professor of Sociology 

B.S., Ph.D., Florida State; M. Div., Chicago Theological Seminary 

Qsry A. Cook (1975) Instructor in Art 

; B.F.A., Michigan State; M.F.A., Northern Illinois 

L >n P. Cook Jr. (1957) Associate Professor of Accountancy 

B.S., Virginia Polytechnic; M.S., Tennessee; C.P.A., Arkansas 

lijticy J. Cotton (1977) Associate Professor of English 

B.A., Texas; M.A., Wisconsin; Ph.D., Columbia 

> n B. Coullard (1977) Instructor in Accountancy 

B.S.E.E., Louisiana State; M.B.A., Syracuse; Ed.D., North Carolina (Greensboro) 

C:lone Covey (1968) Professor of History 

B.A., Ph.D., Stanford 

^Frnces Creighton (1976) Instructor in Romance Languages 

B.A., Marshall; M.A., Tennessee 

(ristopher D. Cribaro (1978) Instructor in Histoiy 

B.S., Loyola; M.A., DePaul 

Iiricia M. Cunningham (1978) Assistant Professor of Education 

B.A., Rhode Island; M.S., Florida State; Ed.S. Indiana State; Ph.D., Georgia 

este A. Daser (1978) Assistant Professor of Business 

B.A., Middle East Tech (Ankara); M.S., Ege (Izmir); Ph.D., North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

IjDorah S. David (1975) Instructor in Physical Education 

B.S., M.A., Florida 

*£ ;an House David (1979) Instructor in German 

B.A., Wake Forest; M.A., North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

J, Villiam Dellastatious (1975) Lecturer in Physical Education 

B.S., M.S., Missouri 

IL mal Devi (1979) Instructor in Mathematics 

B.S., Panjab; M.S., Ohio; M.S., North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

/„in P. Dewasthali (1975) Associate Professor of Business 

B.S., Bombay; M.S., Ph.D., Delaware 

J, in F. Dimmick (1961) Associate Professor of Biology 

B.S., M.S., Western Illinois; Ph.D., Illinois 

I^nald V. Dimockjr. (1970) Associate Professor of Biology 

B.A., New Hampshire; M.S., Florida State; Ph.D., California (Santa Barbara) 



■t-time 



178 

*James H. Dodding (1979) Visiting Lecturer in Theal 

**Joseph Dodson (1977) Visiting Lecturer in Educatu 

B.A., Western Carolina; M.Ed., Ed.D., Georgia 

tThomas E. Dougherty Jr. (1977) Visiting Lecturer in Religii 

B.A., Wake Forest; M.Div., Ph.D., Southern Baptist Seminary 

| 
Robert H . Dufort ( 1 96 1 ) Professor of Psychoh 

B.A., Ph.D., Duke 



i 



Robert Allen Dyer (1956) Professor of Religio 

B.A., Louisiana State; Th.M., Ph.D., Southern Baptist Seminary 

ttjohn R. Earle (1963) Professor of Socioloi 

B.A., Wake Forest; M.A., Ph.D., North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

**C. Drew Edwards (1980) Visiting Assistant Professor of Psychoid? 

B.A., Furman; M.A., Wake Forest; Ph.D., Florida State 

Leo Ellison Jr. ( 1 957) Assistant Professor of Physical Educatw 

B.S., M.S., Northwestern State 

Thomas M. Elmore ( 1 962) Professor of Counseling Psycholog 

B.A., Wake Forest; M.A., George Peabody; Ph.D., Ohio State 

Gerald W. Esch (1965) Professor ofBiolos 

B.S., Colorado College; M.S., Ph.D., Oklahoma 

Andrew V. Ettin (1977) Associate Professor of Englisl 

B.A., Rutgers; M.A., Ph.D., Washington 

Herman E. Eure (1974) Assistant Professor of Biolog 

B.S., Maryland State; Ph.D., Wake Forest 

David K. Evans (1966) Associate Professor of Anthropolosn 

B.S., Tulane; Ph.D., California (Berkeley) 

Stephen Ewing (1971) Associate Professor of Business 

B.S., Howard Payne; M.B.A., Baylor; D.B.A., Texas Tech 

Philippe R. Falkenberg (1969) Associate Professor of Psycholog 

B.A., Queen's (Ontario); Ph.D., Duke 

Doranne Fenoaltea (1977) Associate Professor of Romance Languages 

B.A., Mount Holyoke; A.M., Ph.D., Harvard 

Jack D. Fleer (1964) Professor of Politics 

B.A., Oklahoma Baptist; M.S., Florida State; Ph.D., North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

Walter S. Flory (1963) Babcock Professor of Botan) 

B.A., Bridgewater; M.A., Ph.D., Virginia; Sc.D., Bridgewater 



*Spnng 1980 
** Part-time, spring 1980 

t Part-time 
ttOn leave, fall 1979 



t 






179 

j 
D le R. Fosso (1964) Professor of English 

A.B., Harvard; M.A., Michigan; Ph.D., Harvard 

R )h S. Fraser (1962) Professor of German 

i'l B.A., Boston; M.A., Syracuse; Ph.D., Illinois 

D iald E. Frey (1972) Associate Professor of Economics 

B.A., Wesleyan; M.Div., Yale; Ph.D., Princeton 

m oline S. Fullerton (1969) Instructor in Theatre Arts 

I B.A., Rollins; M.A., Texas Christian 

J; hes A. Gallatin (1979) Instructor in Music 

B.S., Old Dominion; M.M., Western Michigan 

C. Gentry (1949) Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., Wake Forest; B.S., New York; M.A., Ph.D., Duke 



/hitfield Gibbons (1971) Adjunct Associate Professor of Biology 

B.S., M.A., Alabama; Ph.D., Michigan State 

Ctistopher Giles (1951) Assistant Professor of Music 

□ B.S., Florida Southern; M.A., George Peabody 

K hleen Glenn (1974) Associate Professor of Romance Languages 

>» B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Stanford 
j . 
B krishna Govind Gokhale (1960) Professor of History and Asian Studies 

< B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Bombay 

L lis R. Goldstein (1979) Instructor in Music 

i B.M., Oberlin; M.F.A., California Institute of the Arts; D.M.A., Eastman 

r rold O. Goodman (1958) Adjunct Professor of Biology 

1 B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Minnesota 

1 :>mas F. Gossett (1967) Professor of English 

f B.A., M.A., Southern Methodist; Ph.D., Minnesota 

t vard L. Grant (1977) Assistant Professor of Military Science 

} B.B.A., Texas A & M 

C jrge J. Griffin (1948) Professor of Religion 

B.A., Wake Forest; Th.B., Southern Baptist Seminary; B.D., Yale; Ph.D., Edinburgh 

I il M. Gross Jr. (1959) Associate Professor of Chemistry 

i B.S., Duke; Ph.D.. Brown 

I Ham H. Gulley (1966) Associate Professor of Sociology 

I B.A., M.A., Ph.D., North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

I v'id W. Hadley (1966) Associate Professor of Histoiy 

B.A., Wake Forest; A.M., Ph.D., Harvard 

*( lire H. Hammond (1978) Instructor in Economics 

B.A., Mary Washington 



■ <i-Ume 
I 7 1979 



180 

J. Daniel Hammond (1978) Assistant Professor of Econamu 

B.A., Wake Forest; Ph.D., Virginia 

*Emmett Willard Hamrick (1952) Professor of Religun 

B.A., North Carolina (Chapel Hill); Ph.D., Duke 

Phillip J. Hamrick Jr. (1956) Professor of Chemistr 

B.S., Morris Harvey; Ph.D., Duke- 
Carl V. Harris (1956) Professor of Classical Languagt 

B.A., Wake Forest; B.D., S.T.M., Yale; Ph.D., Duke 

**Lucille S. Harris (1957) Instructor in Musi 

B.A., B.M., Meredith 

**Negley Boyd Harte (1978) Lecturer in Hislm 

B.S., London School of Economics (London 

Ysbrand Haven (1965) Professor of Physia 

Candidate, Doctorandus, Doctor, Rijks (Netherlands) 

Elmer K. Hayashi (1973) Associate Professor of Mathematic. 

B.A., California (Davis); M.S., San Diego State; Ph.D., Illinois 

Michael D. Hazen (1974) Assistant Professor of Speech Communication 

B.A., Seattle Pacific; M.A., Wake Forest; Ph.D., Kansas 

Roger A. Hegstrom (1969) Associate Professor of Chemistr 

B.A., St. Olaf; A.M., Ph.D., Harvard 

Robert M. Helm (1940) Professor of Philosoplv 

B.A., Wake Forest; M.A., Ph.D., Duke 

J. Edwin Hendricks (1961) Professor of Histoid 

B.A., Furman; M.A., Ph.D., Virginia 

Marcus B. Hester (1963) Professor of Philosophy 

B.A., Wake Forest; Ph.D., Vanderbilt 

**S. Hugh High (1978) Visiting Assistant Professor of Economit 

A.B., Texas Christian; Ph.D., Duke 

David Allen Hills (I960) Associate Professor of Psychology 

B.A., Kansas; M.A., Ph.D., Iowa 

Willie L. Hinze (1975) Assistant Professor of Chemistr) 

B.S., M.A., Sam Houston State; Ph.D., Texas A & M 

Fred L. Horton Jr. (1970) Associate Professor of Religion 

B.A., North Carolina (Chapel Hill); B.D., Union Seminary; Ph.D., Duke 

William L. Hottinger (1970) Associate Professor of Physical Education 

B.S., Slippery Rock; M.S., Ph.D., Illinois 

William D. Hounshell (1978) Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., California Institute; M.A., Ph.D., Princeton 



*On leave, spring 1980 
**Part-time 



181 

edric T. Howard (1966) Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., M.A., Vanderbilt; Ph.D., Duke 

rah Hutslar (1977) Visiting Assistant Professor of Physical Education 

B.S., Ohio State; M.Ed., Miami; Ph.D., Ohio State 

:lmer P. Hylton (1949) Professor of Accountancy 

B.S., M.B.A., Indiana; C.P.A., Indiana 

I larles F. Jackels (1977) Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

B. Chem., Minnesota; Ph.D., Washington 

^isan C. Jackels (1977) Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

B.A., Carleton; Ph.D., Washington 

tricia Adams Johnson (1969) Instructor in English 

B.A., Winston-Salem State; M.A., Wake Forest 

'. Dillon Johnston (1973) Associate Professor of English 

B.A., Vanderbilt; M.A., Columbia; Ph.D., Virginia 

onzo W. Kenion (1956) Professor of English 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Duke 

'tlph C. Kennedy III (1976) Assistant Professor of Philosophy 

B.A., Ph.D., California (Berkeley) 

illiam C. Kerr (1970) Associate Professor of Physics 

B.S., Wooster; Ph.D., Cornell 

'arry L. King Jr. (1960) Professor of Romance Languages 

B.A., Richmond; M.A., Ph.D., North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

len E. Kirkman (1975) Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., Wooster; M.A., M.S., Ph.D., Michigan State 

e G. Knight (1979) Instructor in Accountancy 

B.S., Western Kentucky; M.A., Alabama 

iJ 

Sbert Knott (1975) Associate Professor of Art 

B.A., Stanford; M.A., Illinois; Ph.D., Pennsylvania 

'.ymond E. Kuhn (1968) Professor of Biology 

B.S., Carson-Newman; Ph.D., Tennessee 

mes Kuzmanovich (1972) Associate Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., Rose Polytechnic; Ph.D., Wisconsin 

>ugo C. Lane (1973) Assistant Professor of Biology 

Licenciate of the Biological Sciences, Doctorate of the Biological Sciences, Geneva 

■ ian Legakis (1974) Assistant Professor of Art 

B.A., California (Davis); M.A., Ph.D., Chicago 

1 nnette LeSiege (1975) Assistant Professor of Music 

B.A., M.A., San Jose State; Ph.D., Eastman 



irt-time 

i leave, fall 1979 



182 

David B. Levy (1976) Assistant Professor of Must, 

B.M., M.A., Ph.D., Eastman 

Charles M. Lewis (1968) Associate Professor of Philosojm 

B.A., Wake Forest; Ph.D., Vanderbilt; Th.M., Harvard 

Robert H. Lewis (1979) Assistant Professor of Military Scienal 

B.S., North Carolina A 8c T 

John H. Litcher (1973) Associate Professor of 'Education 

B.S., Winona State; M.A., Ph.D., Minnesota 

R. Edward Lobb (1973) Assistant Professor of EngM 

B.A., Toronto; M.A., Virginia; M.A., Ph.D., Princeton 

Allan D. Louden (1977) Instructor in Speech Communicatwi 

B.A., Montana State; M.A., Montana 

Robert W. Lovett (1962, 1968) Associate Professor of Englisl 

B.A., Oglethorpe; M.A.T., Ph.D., Emory 

Sam T. Manoogian (1977) Adjunct Instructor in Psychcim 

B.A., Duke; M.A., Wake Forest; Ph.D., St. Louis 

Milorad R. Margitic (1978) Assistant Professor of Romance Language 

M.A., Leiden (Netherlands); Ph.D., Wayne State 

/ i 

Gregorio C. Martin (1976) Associate Professor of Romance Language 

Diplome, Salamanca (Spain); M.A., Ph.D., Pittsburgh 

George Eric Matthews Jr. (1979) Assistant Professor of Englisl 

B.S., Ph.D., North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

J. Gaylord May (1961) Associate Professor of Mat hematic 

B.S., Wofford; M.A., Ph.D., Virginia 

*Jo Whitten May (1972) Visiting Assistant Professor o 

B.S., Virginia; M.A., Ph.D., North Carolina (Creensboro) Speech Communicatio) 

W. Graham May (1961) Associate Professor of Mathematic 

B.S., Wofford; M.A., Ph.D., Virginia 

Donna Mayer-Martin (1976) Instructor in Musi 

B.M., St. Mary (Kansas); M.M., Cincinnati 

James C. McDonald (1960) Professor of Bioloi 

B.A., Washington (St. Louis); M.A., Ph.D., Missouri 

James G. McDowell (1965) Associate Professor of Histor 

B.A., Colgate; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins 

**Dolly A. McPherson (1974) Lecturer in Englis 

B.A., Southern; M.A., Boston 

tjay Meek (1977) Visiting Lecturer in Englis 

B.A., Michigan; M.A., Syracuse 



*Part-time 

**On leave, 1979-80 
tFall 1979 



183 



ie B. Meinrath (1979) 
B.A., M.A., Wake Forest 

ik H. Meinrath (1979) 
B.A., Eckerd; M.A., Wake Forest 

tin L. Melville (1979) 

B.A., North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

|h M. Mesavage (1979) 
1 B.S., Julliard; M. A., Hunter 

I ry B. Miller (1947) 

B.S., Ph.D., North Carolina (Chapel Hil 

c ph O. Milner (1969) 



Instructor in Psychology 

Instructor in Psychology 

Visiting Instructor in Education 

Instructor in Romance Languages 

Professor of Chemistry 

Associate Professor of Education 



B.A., Davidson; M.A., Ph.D., North Carolina (Chapel Hil 

I Iton T. Mitchell (1961) Professor of Religion 

B.A., Wake Forest; B.D., Yale; S.T.M., Union Seminary, Ph.D., New York 



[i V. Mochnick (1976) 

B.M., Heidelberg; M.M., Indiana; D.M.A., Cincinnati 



Assistant Professor of Music 



Associate Professor of Economics 



I n C. Moorhouse (1969) 

B.A., Wabash; Ph.D., Northwestern 

', I C. Moses (1964) Associate Professor of Politics 

A.B., William and Mary; M.A., Ph.D., North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

\ iam M. Moss (1971) Associate Professor of English 

■ B.A., Davidson; Ph.D., North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 



>mas E. Mullen (1957) 
5 B.A., Rollins; M.A., Ph.D., Emory 

; draj. Newell (1978) 

; B.S., Ph.D., Toledo 

111 

: delas M. Newton (1978) 

B.A , Salamanca (Spain); M.A., Pittsburgh 

,4a N. Nielsen (1974) 

B.A., Stetson; M.S., Ed.D., Tennessee 

aid E. Noftle (1967) 
B.S., New Hampshire; Ph.D., Washington 

: a W. Nowell (1945) 

B.S., Wake Forest; Ph.D., North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

IksC. O'Flaherty (1947) 

B.A., Georgetown College; M.A., Kentucky; Ph.D., Chicago 

lirhomas Olive (1961) 

B.S., Wake Forest; M.A., Ph.D., North Carolina State 



Professor of History 

Visiting Assistant Professor of Biology 

Instructor in Romance Languages 

Assistant Professor of Education 

Professor of Chemistry 

Professor of Chemistry 

Professor of German 

Associate Professor of Biology 



■time 
"ave.fall 1979 



184 

Gillian Rose Overing (1979) Visiting Assistant Professor of Engi 

B.A., Lancaster (England); M.A., Ph.D., S.U.N.Y. (Buffalo) 

*Susan A. Ostrander (1978) Assistant Professor of Sociala* 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Case Western Reserve 

Jeanne Owen (1956) Professor of Business L 

B.S., North Carolina (Greensboro); M.C.S., Indiana; J. D., North Carolina (Chapel II 

John E. Parker Jr. (1950) Professor of Education and Romance Langua. 

B.A., Wake Forest; M.A., Ph.D., Syracuse 

Philip J. Perricone (1967) Associate Professor of Socioh 

B.S., M.A., Florida; Ph.D., Kentucky 

Percival Perry (1939, 1947) Professor of Hist 

B.A., Wake Forest; M.A., Rutgers; Ph.D., Duke 

**Elizabeth Phillips ( 1 957) Professor of Engl 

B.A., North Carolina (Greensboro); M.A., Iowa; Ph.D., Pennsylvania 

tTerisio Pignatti (1971) Visiting Professor of Art Hist 

Ph.D., Padua (Veni 

Andrew W. Polk III (1977) Instructor in / 

B.F.A., Memphis State; M.F.A., Indiana 

Lee Harris Potter (1965) Professor of Engl i 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

ttHermanJ. Preseren (1953) Professor of Educatit 

B.S., California State (Pennsylvania); M.A., Columbia; 
Ph.D., North Carolina (Chanel Hill) 

Gregory D. Pritchard (1968) Professor of Philosopi 

B.A., Oklahoma Baptist; B.D., Southern Baptist Seminary; Ph.D., Columbia 

Teresa Radomski (1977) Instructor in Mus 

B.M., Eastman; M.M., Colorado 

J. Don Reeves (1967) Professor of Educatit 

B.A., Mercer; B.D., Th.M., Southern Baptist Seminary; Ed.D., Columbia 

Jon M. Reinhardt (1964) Associate Professor of Politi 

B.A., Birmingham-Southern; M.A., Ph.D., Tulane 

Walter J. Rejeski Jr. (1978) Assistant Professor of Physical Educatio 

B.S., Norwich; M.A., Ph.D., Connecticut 

Mark Rigney Reynolds (1979) Instructor in Englis 

B.A., William and Mary; M.A., Exeter (England) 

Paul M. Ribisl (1973) Associate Professor of Physical Educatio 

B.S., Pittsburgh; M.A., Kent State; Ph.D., Illinois 



*Fall 1979 
**On leave, spring 1980 

fPart-time 
ttOn leave, fall 1979 



185 



CsH. Richards Jr. (1952) 

B.A., Texas Christian; M.A., Ph.D., Duke 

Sphen H. Richardson (1963) 

B.A., California; M.S., Ph.D., Southern California 

Carles L. Richman (1968) 

B.A., Virginia; M.A., Yeshiva; Ph.D., Cincinnati 

Siphen P. Richters (1979) 
B.S., Vassar; M.S., Brown 

Ljmard P. Roberge (1974) 

B.A., New Hampshire; M.A., Atlanta; Ed.D., Maine 

Bry Frances Robinson (1952) 

B.A., Wilson; M.A., Ph.D., Syracuse 

jL. Marie Rodtwitt (1966) 

Can. Philol., Oslo (Norway) 

: f:hael Roman (1973) 
\ A.B., Harvard; M.A., Ph.D., Pennsylvania 



I ira V. Rouzan (1975) 

B.A., Xavier; M.A., Georgia 

GIL. Sailer (1977) 



Professor of Politics 
Adjunct Professor of Biology 
Associate Professor of Psychology 
Instructor in Mathematics 
Assistant Professor of Education 
Professor of Romance Languages 
Lecturer in Romance Languages 
Assistant Professor of English 
Instructor in Speech Communication 
Instructor in Physical Education 



B.S., Bowling Green State; M.A., North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

Assistant Professor of Art 



■sin Russell Sale (1979) 

B.A., Yale; Ph.D., Pennsylvania 

^ Imer D. Sanders (1954, 1964) 
( B.A., Muhlenberg; M.A., Ph.D., Indiana 

J in W. Sawyer (1956) 

B.A., M.A., Wake Forest; M.A., Ph.D., Missouri 

I nald O. Schoonmaker (1965) 
B B.A., Wake Forest; M.A., Ph.D., Princeton 

I rianne A. Schubert (1979) 
i B.A., Dayton; M.A., Ph.D., Southern Illinois 

Fihard D. Sears (1964) 
> B.A., Clark; M.A., Ph.D., Indiana 



Associate Professor of German 

Professor of Mathematics 

Associate Professor of Politics 

Lecturer i)i Education 

Associate Professor of Politics 

Professor of Mathematics 



IiM. Seelbinder (1959) 

B.A., Mississippi Delta State; M.A., Ph.D., North Carolina (Chapel Hi 

i rgaret B. Seelbinder (1961, 1977) Instructor in Mathematics 

H B.A., Randolph-Macon Woman's College; M.A., North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

I rothy Jean Carter Seeman (1976) Visiting Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.A., Wake Forest; B.S., Ph.D., Georgia 



( leave 1979-80 
1 t-time 



186 

Timothy F. Sellner (1970) Associate Professor of Genua 

B.A., Michigan; M.A., Wayne State; Ph.D., Michigan 

Bynum G. Shaw (1965) Lecturer in Journalist 

B.A., Wake Forest 

Judith Johnson Sherwin (1980) Visiting Lecturer in Englis 

B.A., Barnard 

Howard W. Shields (1958) Professor of Physu 

B.S., North Carolina (Chapel Hill); M.S., Pennsylvania State; Ph.D., Duke 

Susan Grace Shillinglaw (1977) Instructor in Englis 

B.A., Cornell (Iowa); M.A., North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

*Franklin R. Shirley (1948) Professor of Speech Communicatio, 

B.A., Ceorgetown; M.A., Columbia; Ph.D., Florida 

Richard L. Shoemaker (1950) Professor of Romance Language 

B.A., Colgate; M.A., Syracuse; Ph.D., Virginia 

Robert N. Shorter (1958) Professor of EnglM 

B.A., Union College; M.A., Ph.D., Duke 

Michael L. Sinclair (1968) Associate Professor of Hist or 

B.A., Wake Forest; A.M., Ph.D., Stanford 

David L. Smilev (1950) Professor of Hist or 

B.A., M.A., Baylor; Ph.D., Wisconsin 

J. Howell Smith (1965) Associate Professor of Histor 

B.A., Baylor; M.A., Tulane; Ph.D., Wisconsin 

Margaret Supplee Smith (1979) Associate Professor of At 

B.S., Missouri; M.A., Case Western Reserve; Ph.D., Brown 

Cecelia H. Solano (1977) Assistant Professor of Psychoht 

B.A., Radcliffe; M.A., Ph.D., Johns Hopkins 

** Wayne M. Sotile (1979) Visiting Assistant Professor of Psycholoi 

B.S., Louisiana State; Ph.D., South Carolina 

Blanche C. Speer (1972) Assistant Professor of Linguistic 

B.A. Howard Payne; M.A., Ph.D., Colorado 

James A. Steintrager (1969) Professor of Politic 

B.A., Notre Dame; M.A., Ph.D., Chicago 

Laura M. Stone (1977) Visiting Assistant Professor of Classical Language 

B.A., Smith; M.A„ Ph.D., North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

*Henry Smith Stroupe (1937) Professor of Histor 

B.S, M.A. Wake Forest; Ph.D., Duke 

David A. Stump (1977) Adjunct Instructor in Psychohm 

B.A.. Trinitv (Texas); M.A., Ph.D., Houston 



*On leave, fall 1979 
**Part-time 



187 

^ la-Vera Sullam (1972) Instructor in Romance Languages 

B.A., Padua (Venice) 

I ert L. Sullivan (1962) Professor of Biology 

1 B.A., Delaware; M.S., Ph.D., North Carolina State 

] rles H. Talbert (1963) Professor of Religion 

B.A., Howard; B.D., Southern Baptist Seminary; Ph.D., Vanderbilt 

r >mas C. Taylor (1971) Associate Professor of Accountancy 

\ B.S., M.A., North Carolina (Chapel Hill); Ph.D., Louisiana State; C.P.A., North Carolina 

(old C. Tedford (1965) Associate Professor of Theatre Arts 

t B.A., Ouachita; M.A., Arkansas; Ph.D., Louisiana State 
>l lton K. Tefft (1964) Professor of Anthropology 

B.A., Michigan State; M.S., Wisconsin; Ph.D., Minnesota 

li y Beth Thomas (1971) Associate Professor of Biology 

;■' B.A., Agnes Scott; M.A., Ph.D., North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

d hael J. Thomas (1978) Assistant Professor of Chemistiy 

'• B.S., Indiana; Ph.D., California (Los Angeles) 

) 'e S. Thomas (1978) Instructor in Business 

■ B.S., Wake Forest; M.B.A., North Carolina (Greensboro); C.P.A., North Carolina 

^ ie S. Tillett (1956, 1960) Professor of Romance Languages 

' B.A., Carson-Newman; M.A., Vanderbilt; Ph.D., Northwestern 

. yell R. Tillett (1956) Professor of Histoiy 

B.A., Carson-Newman; M.A., Columbia; Ph.D.. North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

I iard I. Tirrell (1977) Visiting Lecturer in Education 

B.S., Purdue; M.S., Kansas State 

I ia Trelles (1977) Instructor in Romance Languages 

B.A., Ripon; M.A., Michigan 

l iert W. Ulery Jr. (1971) Associate Professor of Classical Languages 

1 B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Yale 

' tert L. Utley Jr. (1978) Instructor in Politics 

B.A., Wake Forest; M.A., Duke 

i xellus E. Waddill (1962) Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., Hampden-Sydney; M.A., Ph.D., Pittsburgh 

. 'an Wagstaff (1964) Professor of Economics 

B.A., Randolph-Macon; M.B.A., Rutgers; Ph.D., Virginia 

I liam D. Waller (1978) Assistant Professor of Military Science 

B.B.A., Campbell; M.S., Troy State 

pes D. Walter (1978) Visiting Assistant Professor of Sociology 

PI B.A., Kent State; M.A., Indiana; Ph.D., Ohio State 



'-time 
1979 
'-time, foil 1979 



- 



Anderson H. Walters (1975) Professor of Military Science' 

B.S., United States Military Academy; M.S., Ohio State 

David E. Walters (1978) Assistant Professor of Military Science 

B.S., Florida State 

David S. Weaver (1977) Assistant Professor of Anthropoids 

B.A., M.A., Arizona; Ph.D., New Mexico 



Peter D. Weigl (1968) Associate Professor of Biol m 

B.A., Williams; Ph.D., Duke 

David Welker (1969) Professor of Theatre Arts 

B.A., M.A., Illinois; Ph.D., Minnesota 

*Larry E. West (1969) Associate Professor of German* 

B.A., Berea; Ph.D., Vanderbilt 

**Frank H. Whitchurch (1971) Instructor in Romance LangiMM 

B.S., M.A., Minnesota; M.A., Ohio State 

Alan J. Williams (1974) Assistant Professor of Historj 

B.A., Stanford; Ph.D., Vale 

George P. Williams (1958) Professor of Physics] I 

B.S., Richmond; M.S., Ph.D., North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

tjohn E. Williams (1959) Professor of Psychology 

B.A., Richmond; M.A., Ph.D., Iowa 



Edwin Graves Wilson (1946, 1951) Professor of Englii 

B.A., Wake Forest; A.M., Ph.D., Harvard 

William A. Wilson (1977) Visiting Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Virginia 

Donald H. Wolfe (1968) Associate Professor of Theatre Arts 

B.S., M.S., Southern Illinois; Ph.D., Cornell 

Frank B. Wood (1971) Adjunct Assistant Professor of PsychoM 

B.A., M.A., Wake Forest; M.Div., Southeastern Baptist Seminary; Ph.D., Duke 

Ralph C. Wood Jr. (1971) Associate Professor of Relignm 

B.A., M.A., East Texas State; M.A., Ph.D., Chicago 

ttj. Ned Woodall (1969) Associate Professor of Anthropology 

B.A., M.A., Texas; Ph.D., Southern Methodist 

ttjohn J. Woodmansee (1965) Associate Professor of Psychology 

B.A., Westminster; M.A., Denver; Ph.D., Colorado 

John D. Wray (1978) Assistant Professor of Military Scienct 

B.S., Marian 

Raymond L. Wyatt (1956) Professor of Biolog) 

B.S., Wake Forest; M.A., Ph.D., North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 



*On leave, spring 1980 
**Part-time 

tOn leave, fall 1979 
ffOn leave, 1979-80 



189 



y^tiael L. Wyzan (1979) Assistant Professor of Economics 

A.B., Miami (Ohio); Ph.D., North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

ft Buck Yearns Jr. (1945) Professor of History 

B.A., Duke; M.A., Georgia; Ph.D., North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 



t,eH. Zigelis (1977) 
B.A., Smith 

i^ard L. Zuber (1962) 

B.S., Appalachian; M.A., Emory; Ph.D., Duke 



Instructor in Classical Languages 
Professor of History 




Thomas E. Mullen, Dean of the College 



190 

Emeriti 

Dates following names indicate period of service. 

Harold M. Barrow (1948—1977) Professor Emeritus of Physical Education 

B.A., Westminster: M.A., Missouri; P.E.D., Indiana 

Dalma Adolph Brown (1941 — 1973) Professor Emeritus of Englii 

B.A., M.A., North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

Ruth F. Campbell (1962-1974) Professor Emerita of Spanish] 

B.A., North Carolina (Greensboro); M.A., North Carolina (Chapel Hill); Ph.D., Duke 

Marjorie Crisp (1947—1977) Associate Professor Ementol 

B.S., Appalachian; M.A., George Peabody of Physical Education 

Ethel T. Crittenden (1915-1946) Librarian Emenk 

Hugh William Divine (1954—1979) Professor Emeritus of Low 

B.S., Georgia; M.A., Louisiana State; J. D., Emory; LL.M., S.J.D., Michigan 

Cronje B. Earp (1940—1971) Professor Emeritus of Classical Languages 

B.A., Wake Forest; M.A., Ph.D., Columbia 

J. Allen Easley (1928—1963) Professor Emeritus of Religion 

B.A., Furman; Th.M., Southern Baptist Seminary; D.D., Furman 

Edgar Estes Folk (1936—1967) Professor Emeritus of English 

B.A., Wake Forest; M.S., Columbia; Ph.D., George Peabody 

Ralph Cyrus Heath (1954—1969) Professor Emeritus of Marketing 

B.A., Princeton; M.B.A., D.B.A., Indiana 

Owen F. Herring (1946—1963) Professor Emeritus of Religion 

B.A., M.A., Wake Forest; Th.M., Th.D., Southern Baptist Seminary; D.D., Georgetown 

Lois Johnson (1942—1962) Dean of Women Emerim 

B.A., Meredith; M.A., North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

Robert E. Lee (1946—1977) Professor Emeritus of Law and 

B.S., LL.B., Wake Forest; M.A., Columbia; Dean Emeritus of the School of Law 

LL.M., S.J.D., Duke 

Jasper L. Memory Jr. (1929-1971) Professor Emeritus of Education 

B.A., Wake Forest; M.A., Columbia 

Harold Dawes Parcell (1935—1970) Professor Emeritus of Romance Languages 

B.A., North Carolina (Chapel Hill); A.M., Ph.D., Harvard 

Clarence H. Patrick (1946—1978) Professor Emeritus of Sociology 

B.A., Wake Forest; B.D., Andover Newton; Ph.D., Duke 

Grady S. Patterson (1924-1972) Registrar Emeritus 

B.A., Wake Forest 

Beulah L. Raynor (1946—1979) Associate Professor Emerita of English 

B.A., East Carolina; M.A., Wake Forest 

Albert C. Reid (1917-18; 1 920- 1 965) Professor Emeritus of Philosophy 

B.A., M.A., Wake Forest; Ph.D., Cornell 



1 S. Robinson (1952—1977) Professor Emeritus of Music 

B.A., Westminster; B.M., Curtis; M.S.M., D.S.M., Union Seminary 

old Wayland Tribble (1950-1967) President Emeritus 

B. A., Richmond; Th.M., Th.D.. Southern Baptist Seminary; M.A., Louisville; Ph.D., 
Edinburgh; D.D., Stetson; LL.D.. Union, Wake Forest, Richmond, Duke, 
North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 

roll W. Weathers (1950-1972) 
B.A., LL.B., Wake Forest 



C Iton P. West (1928-1975) 



Professor Emeritus of Law and 
Dean Emeritus of the School of Law 

Libra ria n E merit us 



B.A., Boston; M.A., Yale; B.A. in L.S., North Carolina (Chapel Hill) 




192 



The Committees of the Faculty 



September 1, 1980 

The terms of members, except where otherwise shown, expire on August 31 of ti 
year indicated. Each committee selects its own chairman except where the chairman 
designated. All members of a committee vote except as otherwise indicated. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEES 

The Committee on Academic Affairs 

Non-voting. Dean of Men, Dean of Women, Associate Dean, Assistant Dean, and oi 
student in the College. Voting. Dean of the College; 1983 Shasta M. Bryant, John 1 
Litcher; 1982 John William Angell, Kathleen Glenn; 1981 Jack D. Fleer, Timothy 
Sellner; and one student in the College. 

The Committee on Admissions 

Non-voting. Director of Admissions and Financial Aid, Associate Dean of the Colleg 
Dean of Women, and one student in the College. Voting. Dean of the College; 199 
NancyJ. Cotton, Charles L. Richman; 1982 James Kuzmanovich, Ralph C. Wood Ji 
1981 John W. Nowell, Charles H. Talbert, and one student in the College. 

The Committee on Scholarships and Student Aid 

Non-voting. One student in the College. Voting. Dean of the College, Director ( 
Admissions and Financial Aid, Dean of Women, Associate Dean; 1983 Deborah I 
Best, Jon M. Reinhardt; 1982 Ronald V. Dimock Jr., Carl C. Moses; 1981 Peter 1 
Weigl, Alan J. Williams, and one student in the College. 

The Committee on Curriculum 

Voting. Provost, Dean of the College, Registrar, and the chairman of each departmei 
of the College as follows: Division I. Art, Classical Languages, English, Cermai 
Music, Romance Languages, Speech Communication and Theatre Arts. Division I 
Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics, Physical Education, Physics. Division III. Educ; 
tion. History, Military Science, Philosophy, Religion; Division IV. Anthropology 
Business and Accountancy, Economics, Politics, Psychology, Sociology. 

ADVISORY COMMITTEES 

The Committee on Academic Planning 

Non-voting. Provost; and one student in the College. Voting. Dean of the Collegt 
Director of Libraries; 1984 Ellen E. Kirkman, David B. Levy; 1983 James P. Ban 
field, John C. Moorhouse; 1982 Elizabeth Phillips, H. Wallace Baird; 1981 Richard ( 
Barnett, James A. Steintrager, and one student in the College. 



193 



The Committee on Athletics 



^on-voting. Director of Athletics. Voti?ig. Vice President and Treasurer, Dean of the 
College, faculty representative to the Atlantic Coast Conference; 1985 Donald E. 
Frey, Donald O. Schoonmaker; 1984 Marcus B. Hester, J. Don Reeves; 1983 Ivey C. 
Gentry, Jeanne Owen; 1982 John William Angell, David K. Evans, 1981 Philippe R. 
(Falkenberg, Michael L. Sinclair. 

The Committee on Institutional Planning 

', Non-voting. Vice President and Treasurer, and one student in the College. Voting. 
Dean of the College; 1984 James C. McDonald, William M. Moss; 1983 James G. 
McDowell, J. Van Wagstaff; 1982 Charles M. Allen, Lee Harris Potter; 1981 J. Edwin 
Hendricks, John E. Williams, and one student in the College. 

if 

■ I The Committee on Nominations 

Voting. 1983 John L. Andronica, Ronald E. Noftle; 1982 David W. Catron, Gregory 
D. Pritchard; 1981 John A. Carter Jr., C. H. Richards Jr. 

The Committee on Library Planning 

6 Non-voting. Provost, Dean of the Graduate School, one faculty representative from 
| the Committee on Academic Planning, and one student in the College. Voting. One 

faculty member from each department in the College, Dean of the College, Director 

of Libraries, and one student in the College. 

SPECIAL COMMITTEES 

The Committee on Publications 

Dean of the College, Vice President and Treasurer, Director of Communications, the 
three faculty advisers oi Old Gold and Black, The Student, and The Howler; 1983 W. Buck 
Yearns Jr.; 1982 Charles M. Lewis; 1981 David L. Smiley. 

i 

The Committee for Teacher Education 

1 Dean of the College, Dean of the Graduate School, Chairman of the Department of 
Education; 1983 John V. Baxley, Richard D. Sears; 1982 Carl V. Harris, Charles L. 
Richman; 1981 Stephen Ewing, Marcus B. Hester. 

The Committee for the ROTC 

Dean of the College; the ROTC Coordinator, the Professor of Military Science; 1983 
Thomas C. Taylor; 1982 Leon P. Cook Jr.; 1981 James G. McDowell. 

The Committee on Honors 

Non-voting. One student in the College. Voting, Dean of the College, the Coordinator 
of the Honors Program; 1984 J. Howell Smith; 1983 James Kuzmanovich; 1982 
J. Ned Woodall; 1981 Robert W. Ulery Jr., and one student in the College. 



I 'I 



I I! 



194 

The Committee of Lower Division Advisers 

Dean of the College; Chairman of the Lower Division Advisers (Robert W. Breh. 
Brian M. Austin, James P. Barefield, David B. Brovles, John E. Collins, Nan< J 
Cotton, Cyclone Covey, Deborah S. David, John F. Dimmick, Leo Ellison Jr., HerJ 
E. Eure, Philippe R. Falkenberg, Jack D. Fleer, Donald E. Frey, Kathleen Glen 
Thomas F. Gossett, Carl V. Harris, Elmer K. Hayashi, N. Rick Heatley, Marcui 
Hester, David A. Hills, Willie Lee Hinze, Fred L. Horton Jr., William D. Hounsl I 
Patricia A.Johnson, Ralph C. Kennedy III, Ellen E. Kirkman, James Kuzmanovl 
Lula M. Leake, W. Graham May, James G. McDowell, Carlton T. Mitchell, Car;:' 
Moses, Linda N. Nielsen, A. Thomas Olive, Gregory D. Pritchard, Jon M. Reinhal 
Paul M. Ribisl, Eva Marie Rodtwitt, Marianne A. Schubert, Ben M. Seelbindl 
Timothy F. Sellner, Michael L. Sinclair, J. Howell Smith, Cecelia H. Solano, Laural 
Stone, Robert L. Sullivan, Mary Beth Thomas, Anne S. Tillett, Robert W.'uiery I 
Marcellus E. Waddill, James D. Walter, David S. Weaver, Peter D. Weigl, Larry! 
West, Frank H. Whitchurch, Alan J. Williams, Ralph C. Wood Jr., Raymond T. Wy! 
Open Curriculum: Roger A. Hegstrom, William C. Kerr. 

The Committee on Orientation 

Dean of the College, Chairman of the Lower Division Advisers, Dean of Men, Deanf 
Women, President of the Student Government or his or her representative, al 
other persons from the administration and student body invited by the chairma. 

The Committee on Records and Information 

Non-voting. The Registrar. Voting. Dean of the College, Archivist, Vice President f 
the Faculty, Secretary of the Faculty, 1983 Raymond L. Wvatt, 1982 Cyclone Govt 
1981 Charles M. Allen. 

The Committee on Open Curriculum 

Dean of the College; 1984 Fred L. Horton Jr., Fredric T. Howard; 1983 John 
Andronica, J. Ned Woodall; 1982 David W. Hadley, William C. Kerr; 1981 John 
Carter Jr., Donald O. Schoonmaker. 

JOINT FACULTY/ADMINISTRATION COMMITTEES 

The Joint Admissions Committee 

Dean of the College, Director of Admissions and Financial Aid, Provost, Herman 1 
Eure, James Kuzmanovich, Robert N. Shorter 

The Judicial Council 

Administration. Toby A. Hale, Patricia A. Johnson. Faculty. Fred L. Horton Jr Jeann 
Owen, Blanche C. Speer, Marcellus E. Waddill, George P. Williams; two students it 
the College. Faculty Alternates. Richard C. Barnett, Carlton T. Mitchell. Administrativ 
Alternate. Ben M. Seelbinder; and one student alternate. 



195 

The Committee on Student Life 

>ean of the College or his designate, Dean of Women, Dean of Men; 1983 Brian M. 
ustin; 1982 William H. Gulley; 1981 Ralph C. Wood Jr., and three students in the 
ollege. 

OTHER FACULTY ASSIGNMENTS 

Faculty Advisers to the Honor Council 

1982 Gregory D. Pritchard, 1981 Robert N. Shorter, 1980 A. Thomas Olive 

Faculty Advisers to Student Judicial Board 

1982 Ralph C. Kennedy III, 1981 Stephen Ewing, 1980 Ellen E. Kirkman 

Faculty Marshals 

Carlton T. Mitchell, John E. Parker Jr., Mary Frances Robinson 

OTHER COMMITTEES 

Fqual Opportunity Advisory Committee 

Lori E. Bailey, Frances G. Baird, Bernard E. Beatty, Charles Blackwell, Ronald M. 
Boston, Dorothy Casey, Edgar D. Christman, Herman E. Eure, Harriett Faulkner, 
'James L. Ferrell, Mildred K. Garris, Joseph G. Gordon, Ross A. Griffith, Thomas E. 
Mullen, Larry L. Palmer, Curtis L. Parker, Charles P. Rose Jr., Laura V. Rouzan, 
Meyressa H. Schoonmaker, Nat E. Smith, Nina Stokes, Henry Smith Stroupe. 

University Grievance Committee 

i College. Jeanne Owen, Harry B. Miller (alternate); Graduate School. Richard W. 
St. Clair, David W. Catron (alternate); School of Law. Donald R. Castleman, Joel S. 
Newman (alternate); Bahcock School of Management. William J. Heisler, Robert N. 
White (alternate); Bowman Gray School of Medicine. Timothy C. Pennell, Walter J. Bo 
(alternate). 

UNIVERSITY SENATE 

President, Provost, Vice-President for Health Affairs, Vice President and Treasurer, 
Dean of the College, Dean of the Graduate School, Dean of the School of Law, Dean 
of the Babcock Graduate School of Management, Dean of the Bowman Gray School 
of Medicine, Director of Libraries, and the following: 

Representatives of the College: 1984 Ralph S. Fraser, Robert M. Helm; 1983 Bynum G. 
Shaw, Charles H. Talbert; 1982 Alonzo W. Kemon, James C. OTlaherty; 1981 E. 
Pendleton Banks, C. H. Richards Jr. 



196 



Representatives of the Graduate School: 1984 Percival Perry, 1983 Howard W Shies 
1982 Carol C. Cunningham, 1981 H. Wallace Baird. 

Representatives of the School of Law: 1983 Joel S. Newman; 1981 Rhoda B. Billinl 

Representatives of the Babcock Graduate School of Management: 1983 Thomas A Gol 
1981 William J. Heisler. 

Representatives of the Bowman Gray School of Medicine: 1984 Timothy C Pennell PS 
C. Douglas Maynard, 1982 Eben Alexander, 1981 Robert W. Prichard. 




PH. ll.A 




J.J> 

feiiii" 




197 



Index 



Jilir I Academic Awards, 22 
P ji Academic Calendar, 31 
i Accountancy, 73 
! Accreditation, 10 
"H Administration, 18, 169 
Admission Deposit, 29 
Admission Requirements, 26 
Advance Placement, 27 
Advising, 31 

; Anthropology, 58 
Application for Admission, 26 
II Applied Music, 1 10 

I 1 1 Applied Music Fees, 29 

I I Art, 62 






Art History, 62 

Artists Series, 24 

Asian Studies, 65 

Athletic Awards, 23 

Athletic Scholarships, 23 

Athletics, 23 

Attendance Requirements, 32 

Auditing, 33 

Babcock Graduate School of 

Management, 8 
Basic Course Requirements, 51 
Basic Education Opportunity 

Grants, 39 
Biology, 67 

Board of Trustees, 166 
Board of Visitors, 167 
Bowman Gray School of Medicine, 8 
Buildings and Grounds, 18 
Business, 71 

Business and Accountancy, 71 
Calendar, 2 
Campus Ministry, 24 
Career Development Service, 25 
Carswell Scholarships, 38 
Case Referral Board, 21 
Charges, 28, 29 
Chemistry, 74 
Chinese, 140 
Class Attendance, 32 
Classical Languages, 76 



Classics, 78 

Classification, 32 

CLEP, 27 

College History and Development, 12 

College Union, 21 

College Work/Study Program, 45 

Combined Degrees, 54 

Committees of the Faculty, 192 

Concessions, 44 

Course Numbers, 58 

Course Repetition, 35 

Courses of Instruction, 58 

Cultural Activities, 24 

Dance, 1 14 

Dean's List, 35 

Debate, 145 

Degree Requirements, 50 

Degrees, 50 

Degrees Conferred, 150 

Dentistry Degree, 57 

Dijon Semester, 48, 136 

Distinctions Conferred, 150 

Divisional Course Requirements, 51 

Double Majors, 54 

Dropping a Course, 33 

Early Decision, 27 

Economics, 79 

Education, 82 

Educational Planning, 25 

Emeriti, 90 

Engineering Degree, 57 

English, 87 

Enrollment Summary, 163 

Examination, 34 

Exchange Scholarships, 42 

Expenses, 28 

Faculty, 175 

Fees, 29 

Fields of Study, 50, 53 

Financial Aid, 38 

Food Services, 29 

Forestry and Environmental 

Studies Degree, 57 
Four-Week Courses, 48 



198 



Fraternities, 21 

French, 134 

French Semester, 48, 136 

Geographical Distribution, 164 

German, 92 

Grade Reports, 35 

Grading System, 34 

Graduate School, 8 

Graduation Distinctions, 35, 150 

Graduation Fee, 29 

Graduation Requirements, 50 

Greek, 77 

Handicapped Students, Admission, 

Hankins Scholarships, 38 

Health Service, 25, 29 

Hebrew, 132 

Hindi, 141 

History, 94 

Honor Council, 20 

Honor Societies, 22 

Honor Code, 20 

Honors Study, 47, 100 

Housing, 30 

Humanities, 98 

Incomplete Grades, 34 

Independent Study, 49 

Indian Semester, 49 

Intercollegiate Athletics, 23 

Interdisciplinary Honors, 100 

Interfraternity Council, 22 

Intersociety Council, 22 

Intramural Athletics, 23 

Italian, 141 

January Study, 48 

Joint Majors, 54 

Journalism, 89 

Judicial Board, 21 

Latin, 77 

Law Degree, 54 

Law School, 8 

Libraries, 9 

Loans, 43 

London Semester, 48 

Lower Division Requirements, 50 

Majors, 50 

Management School, 8 



Mathematical Economics, 80, 102 
Mathematics, 102 
Mathematics-Biology, 102 
Mathematics-Business, 71, 103 
Maximum Number of Courses, 54 
Medical School, 8 
Medical Sciences Degree, 55 
Medical Technology Degree, 55 
Men's Residence Council, 21 
Microbiology Degree, 56 
Military Science, 105 
Ministerial Concessions, 45 
27 Mortar Board, 22, 161 
Music, 106 

Music Education, 84, 109 
Music Ensemble, 110 
Music History, 108 
Music Theory, 107 
North Carolina Student Incentive 

Grants, 41 
Norwegian, 141 
Omicron Delta Kappa, 22, 161 
Open Curriculum, 47 
Orientation, 31 
Palmer Award, 23 
Pass/Fail Grades, 34 
Phi Beta Kappa, 22, 161 
Philosophy, 1 1 1 
Physical Education, 114 
Physical Education Requirement, 52, 
Physician Assistant Program 

Degree, 56 
Physics, 1 17 
Piccolo Award, 23 
Placement Service, 25 
Politics, 119 
Probation, 35 
Procedures, 26 
Professional Fraternities, 22 
Professional Schools, 8 
Proficiency in the English 

Language, 52 
Psychological Service, 25 
Psychology, 124 
Publications, 24 
Purpose, 1 1 



11 



199 



Radio Station, 24 
Radio/Television/Film, 147 
Readmission Requirements, 37 
Recognition, 10 
Refunds, 30 
Registration, 31 
Religion, 128 
Religious Activities, 24 
Repetition of Courses, 35 
Requirements for Continuation, 36 
Requirements for Degrees, 50 
Residence Councils, 21 
Residence Hall Charges, 29, 30 
Residential Language Centers, 47 
Romance Languages, 133 
' Room Charges, 29, 30 
ROTC, 105 
Russian, 141 

Salamanca Semester, 49, 140 
Salem College Study, 47 
Scholarships, 38 
Senior Conditions, 37 
Senior Testing, 54 
Societies, Social, 21 
Sociology, 142 
Spanish, 137 

Spanish Semester, 49, 140 
Special Programs, 47 
Speech Communication, 144 



Student/Student Spouse 

Employment, 45 
Student Government, 20 
Student Legislature, 20 
Student Life, 20 
Student Publications, 24 
Studio Art, 65 
Studv Abroad, 48 
Summer Session, 48 
Summer Study Elsewhere, 48 
Teaching Area Requirements. S3 
Theatre Arts, 144 
Transcripts, 30 
Transfer Credit, 28 
Trustees, 166 
Tuition, 28 
University, 8 

Upper Division Study, 53 
Vehicle Registration, 30 
Venice Semester, 48, 141 
Veteran Benefits, 46 
Visitors, 167 
WFDD-FM, 25 
Withdrawal from the 

College, 33 
Women's Residence Council, 21 
Work/Study Program, 45 
Worsham Scholarship, 23 




200 



Bulletins of Wake Forest University 



The College 

Director of Admissions and Financial Aid 

7305 Reynolda Station 

Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27109 

919-701-5201 

The Graduate School 

Dean of the Graduate School 

7487 Reynolda Station 

Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27109 

919-761-5301 

The School of Law 

Director of Admissions 

7206 Reynolda Station 

Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27109 

919-761-5437 

The Babcock Graduate School of Management 

Director of Admissions 

7659 Reynolda Station 

Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27109 

919-761-5422 

The Bowman Gray School of Medicine 

Associate Dean for Admissions 

300 Hawthorne Road 

Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27103 

919-727-4265 

The Summer Session 

Dean of the Summer Session 

7293 Reynolda Station 

Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27109 

919-761-5227 

Marty Lentz, Editor 



Wake Forest University administers all educational and employment activities withou 
discrimination because of race, color, religion, nation origin, age, handicap, or sex 
except where exempt. 




Director of Admissions 
Wake Forest University 
Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27109 



Second Class Post 

Winston-Salem, North 

UPS